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Author Topic: Some questions regarding Alamy  (Read 10269 times)

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« on: February 14, 2018, 13:35 »
+1
Recently joined Alamy and got accepted at first try. I am a hobbyist but have been into microstock for some years now. I have checked the Forum but still have some questions:

Microstock pictures that are not editorial, do they really sell as RF on Alamy if also available at other sites? Is it worth the effort to upload?
Editorials that are not news but rather pictures from big cities etc, is it better to sell them exclusively as RM on Alamy or RF at Alamy and SS/DT etc?

Alamy is quite high in the poll. You who sell well there, is it from RM?

Thanks.


ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2018, 13:51 »
+2
Recently joined Alamy and got accepted at first try. I am a hobbyist but have been into microstock for some years now. I have checked the Forum but still have some questions:

Microstock pictures that are not editorial, do they really sell as RF on Alamy if also available at other sites? Is it worth the effort to upload?
Jury's out. Some people have reported that they've had files searched on Alamy then selling on micros, at least one person has reported they have not seen that. Might be a case of suck it and see.

Quote
Editorials that are not news but rather pictures from big cities etc, is it better to sell them exclusively as RM on Alamy or RF at Alamy and SS/DT etc?
Again, reports are varied, suck it and see, or make a personal choice.

Quote
Alamy is quite high in the poll. You who sell well there, is it from RM?
I sell only RM there, but I'm probably more like 'average' there.
I have a higher rpi/total but much lower rpd on iS.
Everyone will have a different experience, depending on their content and other decisions. I really don't think you can second guess it. And once you've decided, you can't possibly know if the other choice would have been better.

Not very helpful, sorry; but this has been chewed over endlessly and the results are totally inconclusive.
As are reports there about RF sales. Rather suprisingly, the RF sales $$ which have been reported are not much higher (if at all) than RM sales, which is contrary to expectation. Sadly, that's probably the way things are going.

« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2018, 13:55 »
+1
Congrats on your acceptance!

I sell both RM and RF on Alamy and don't really see much difference in price between the two, however, while I have a few similar images on both the micros and Alamy, most of my portfolio there is different than what I have on the micros.

I just wrote a series of articles that were published over the past few weeks specifically directed at people like you who are new to Alamy but who have been on the micros, and it includes examples of some of my moderate-sellers on there as well. You can find the articles here:

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-1/

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-2/

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-3/

I hope you find them helpful. Your question was perfectly timed!  8)

EDIT:
As Shady Sue said, typing at the same time as I was, the jury's out on whether or not you should upload all your micro images to Alamy. I've lost sales because the images were on the micros and Alamy, and I've sweated it out worried about a refund when one of my photos that was on both the micros and Alamy went for $200 or above, so I keep my portfolios separate. But others swear it makes no difference. Ultimately you have to make a choice and not second-guess yourself. I wasted a lot of time trying to decide where to upload certain images and worrying I'd made the wrong choice, until I decided that I'd stop second-guessing myself.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 14:02 by wordplanet »

« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2018, 14:14 »
+1
You might lose some sales from images that are on Alamy and the micros - that is they might sell for cents instead of $$. Of course if you just leave them on only the micros, they will never sell on Alamy instead of maybe sell a little less than if they were only on Alamy. Is it worth the trouble to upload your micro images there - I don't know, that is something you must decide based on how well you think your images might do and how long it might take to upload them there. Sales on Alamy for me seem to be a pretty random event and I have no ability to predict what might or might not sell - so I would have no way to decide which images should go to Alamy instead of the micros if I thought that having them in the micros would sabotage sales at Alamy.

Also the Alamy license might be closer to an EL at some places, so take that into consideration when comparing sales.

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2018, 14:18 »
+1
Congrats! I don't do editorial but I hear they are good for that.

Alamy is my lowest earner ...

« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2018, 14:59 »
0
Recently joined Alamy and got accepted at first try. I am a hobbyist but have been into microstock for some years now. I have checked the Forum but still have some questions:

Microstock pictures that are not editorial, do they really sell as RF on Alamy if also available at other sites? Is it worth the effort to upload?
Jury's out. Some people have reported that they've had files searched on Alamy then selling on micros, at least one person has reported they have not seen that. Might be a case of suck it and see.

Quote
Editorials that are not news but rather pictures from big cities etc, is it better to sell them exclusively as RM on Alamy or RF at Alamy and SS/DT etc?
Again, reports are varied, suck it and see, or make a personal choice.

Quote
Alamy is quite high in the poll. You who sell well there, is it from RM?
I sell only RM there, but I'm probably more like 'average' there.
I have a higher rpi/total but much lower rpd on iS.
Everyone will have a different experience, depending on their content and other decisions. I really don't think you can second guess it. And once you've decided, you can't possibly know if the other choice would have been better.

Not very helpful, sorry; but this has been chewed over endlessly and the results are totally inconclusive.
As are reports there about RF sales. Rather suprisingly, the RF sales $$ which have been reported are not much higher (if at all) than RM sales, which is contrary to expectation. Sadly, that's probably the way things are going.
Thank you, I realize that I need to do some trial and error...

« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2018, 15:07 »
0
Congrats on your acceptance!

I sell both RM and RF on Alamy and don't really see much difference in price between the two, however, while I have a few similar images on both the micros and Alamy, most of my portfolio there is different than what I have on the micros.

I just wrote a series of articles that were published over the past few weeks specifically directed at people like you who are new to Alamy but who have been on the micros, and it includes examples of some of my moderate-sellers on there as well. You can find the articles here:

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-1/

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-2/

https://www.greatescapepublishing.com/articles/breakfast-stock-club/selling-stock-photos-alamy-part-3/

I hope you find them helpful. Your question was perfectly timed!  8)

EDIT:
As Shady Sue said, typing at the same time as I was, the jury's out on whether or not you should upload all your micro images to Alamy. I've lost sales because the images were on the micros and Alamy, and I've sweated it out worried about a refund when one of my photos that was on both the micros and Alamy went for $200 or above, so I keep my portfolios separate. But others swear it makes no difference. Ultimately you have to make a choice and not second-guess yourself. I wasted a lot of time trying to decide where to upload certain images and worrying I'd made the wrong choice, until I decided that I'd stop second-guessing myself.
Thank you, very interesting read, so perfectly timed! I have to think this over but I think I might upload my best editorials as RM to Alamy and see what happens. And maybe skip the backgrounds...Canva is my very best earner, and there I mostly sell backgrounds.

« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2018, 15:10 »
0
You might lose some sales from images that are on Alamy and the micros - that is they might sell for cents instead of $$. Of course if you just leave them on only the micros, they will never sell on Alamy instead of maybe sell a little less than if they were only on Alamy. Is it worth the trouble to upload your micro images there - I don't know, that is something you must decide based on how well you think your images might do and how long it might take to upload them there. Sales on Alamy for me seem to be a pretty random event and I have no ability to predict what might or might not sell - so I would have no way to decide which images should go to Alamy instead of the micros if I thought that having them in the micros would sabotage sales at Alamy.

Also the Alamy license might be closer to an EL at some places, so take that into consideration when comparing sales.
Thanks! In a way Alamy could be a way to get better sales elsewhere... I realize I need to check and see what happens, and to find out what is valid for my kind of portfolio.

« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2018, 15:11 »
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Congrats! I don't do editorial but I hear they are good for that.

Alamy is my lowest earner ...
Thanks!

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2018, 16:38 »
+2
I think I'm the one that reported that I couldn't find any evidence of an Alamy buyer searching elsewhere (which is not the same thing as proving it!). Here is my latest set of analysis on the topic:

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2018/01/selling-image-alamy-agencies/

Alex also did some analysis and had a discussion with Alamy's content manager here:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2018/02/06/do-alamy-buyers-search-elsewhere-answers-from-alamy/

The end result - I submit all my images to all sites now, but editorial and commercial and use RF on Alamy.

Steve

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2018, 16:42 »
0
Quote
I just wrote a series of articles that were published over the past few weeks specifically directed at people like you who are new to Alamy but who have been on the micros, and it includes examples of some of my moderate-sellers on there as well. You can find the articles here:

And thanks for the article links - I wasn't aware of Great Escape and will investigate further!

Thanks

steve

« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2018, 22:01 »
0
Has anyone had Alamy call them because there was something wrong with a photo they submitted (like in the article linked)?

« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2018, 02:06 »
+2
You might lose some sales from images that are on Alamy and the micros - that is they might sell for cents instead of $$. Of course if you just leave them on only the micros, they will never sell on Alamy


I think you can solve that conundrum mathematically: do 50%+ of buyers on Alamy go on to search the micros to see if they can find the same image cheaper? If not, then it's rational to assume that every Alamy sale lost by having your stuff on all sites will be offset by an Alamy sale gained. I think it's almost certain that a majority of Alamy buyers don't search all over the place to find a cheaper image - after all, we all agree that most people won't look beyond the first few pages of a search before deciding what image to buy, so the idea they will go trawling through the micros if they're prepared to use Alamy is pretty laughable.

Secondly, there seems to be some confusion. If you divide your images into micro and Alamy then you can only lose an Alamy sale if you put the Alamy collection into the micros, you cannot lose an Alamy sale by putting the micro collection on Alamy - because the sale you "lose" could not have happened if the micro image wasn't there.

Thirdly, if you keep your Alamy collection strictly on Alamy then you will lose the possibility of selling any of it on the micros. If the poll results on the right hand side mean anything, then the earnings potential of an image that is on Alamy must be much lower than the earnings potential of having an image on Shutterstock. If you select a particular picture then, of course, one brilliant sale on Alamy could dwarf any earnings it might get from the micros, but if you look at the overall earnings of 1,000 images then on the whole they will earn less on Alamy than they would on Shutterstock alone, let alone what that 1,000 would earn if spread across the top 6 micro sites. Trying to guess which image is going to be a shining star on Alamy is like trying to predict the winning number in a national lottery - it's just not going to happen - so you have to look at the broader averages to work out the best course.

Fourthly, is it worth uploading anywhere these days? If you take account of how much you're likely to earn, it would make more sense for most people to be flipping burgers at McD's. But this is much more fun than that.

Finally, you will get quite a lot of rejections from the micros - if you're doing well then different files will be rejected for various strange reasons   by the different agencies (if they all agree the lighting is rubbish or your horizon is tilted then I'm afraid the problem is you, not them) so the file inspections will cause you to have slightly different portfolios on different sites, but as long as you work doesn't have serious technical errors, like colour banding or sensor spots, Alamy will accept it all.

Anyway, I think I've demonstrated that the rational approach is to put everything everywhere - assuming you're happy to accept paltry returns for all your effort.

PS: if you want to minimise the possibility of Alamy buyers finding your work on the micros use a different alias for Alamy. That will stop them finding you by user name on the micros.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 02:21 by BaldricksTrousers »

« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2018, 02:41 »
+2
I never understood why somebody would search on alamy first to afterwards buy the license on microstock. I think they would search directly on microstock and skip the alamy part.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2018, 04:54 »
0
You might lose some sales from images that are on Alamy and the micros - that is they might sell for cents instead of $$. Of course if you just leave them on only the micros, they will never sell on Alamy
I think you can solve that conundrum mathematically: do 50%+ of buyers on Alamy go on to search the micros to see if they can find the same image cheaper? If not, then it's rational to assume that every Alamy sale lost by having your stuff on all sites will be offset by an Alamy sale gained. I think it's almost certain that a majority of Alamy buyers don't search all over the place to find a cheaper image - after all, we all agree that most people won't look beyond the first few pages of a search before deciding what image to buy, so the idea they will go trawling through the micros if they're prepared to use Alamy is pretty laughable.
Yet several magazines and websites use both Alamy and micros, and sometimes others too, as do many books.
So if someone only uses Alamy (I've never seen that, but they possibly exist), they won't go looking to see if a file they like is available on a micro (because buying one file at a Micro probably costs more than an Alamy bulk discount), they won't look at the micros.
However, if someone has an account at SS, Alamy and Getty (for example, which seems to be common), they will certainly check to see if a file is available on SS first.
But we can't know how often such a buyer satisfices with what they can get on SS, rather than pay (possibly) more on Alamy.

Years back, my biggest Alamy sale was of a subject which wasn't available elsewhere in its exact form; but 'similar enough for most purposes' was on iS (at least) at the time. Of course, I have no idea whether the buyer just needed that particular, exact image or whether they use Alamy only, for convenience. For example, Alamy has a file searching service, but presumably they don't repeatedly do it for search requesters who don't buy.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 05:10 by ShadySue »

« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2018, 05:40 »
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There might well be companies that instruct their staff to search microstock first and only go to Alamy if they can't find what they want. The trouble is, unless your file is different from anything on the micros then buyers are likely to find something good enough without having to resort to Alamy. So rather than protecting your Alamy sale by  not using the micros, you end up missing out entirely - and as the figures show, all those 30-40c micro sales do add up in the long run.
BTW - a couple of days back I got $13 total from three sales on Alamy - is it really worth trying to protect that sort of value per sale by not supplying micros? On the same day one SS sale was for $10.

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2018, 05:46 »
0
Interesting discussion.

As per my article (thanks Steve for adding the link), I've switched over to the RF and everywhere side for everything but the most 'premium' of images AND Live News.

Live News is something that nobody has mentioned on here and I think is important as an editorial photographer. Why would someone in their right mind submit a breaking news/time-sensitive image to micros is beyond me...by the time it goes through the approval process (many hours or days) and indexed it's old news.

I think Alamy Live News feed is brilliant and images are up for sale (RM) literally minutes after submitting. After a few days it goes into the normal stock archives. An argument can be made to duplicate such content everywhere after it is no longer live news and you've correctly changed it to RF on Alamy (and assuming there were no sales as RM).

I also submit Live News to Rex Features (RM) but they seem to be more picky about what they select than Alamy.

Quote
So rather than protecting your Alamy sale by  not using the micros, you end up missing out entirely - and as the figures show, all those 30-40c micro sales do add up in the long run.

Agreed. Not to mention the amount time spent sorting out images and second-guessing yourself which goes where and why.

Quote
BTW - a couple of days back I got $13 total from three sales on Alamy - is it really worth trying to protect that sort of value per sale by not supplying micros? On the same day one SS sale was for $10.

For Feb, my Dreamstime sales are beating Alamy, considering I have 5,500 images on Alamy and only 1,500 on DT :o I love Alamy but I'm finding sales on there so unreliable / sporadic
 
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 06:28 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2018, 06:32 »
+1
I love Alamy but I'm finding sales on there so unreliable / sporadic
That's it in a nutshell, really.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2018, 09:51 »
0
I love Alamy but I'm finding sales on there so unreliable / sporadic
That's it in a nutshell, really.
Sadly, I gave to agree, but when most  Micros are competing directly with them, it's hardly surprising.

« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2018, 12:45 »
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I think I'm the one that reported that I couldn't find any evidence of an Alamy buyer searching elsewhere (which is not the same thing as proving it!). Here is my latest set of analysis on the topic:

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2018/01/selling-image-alamy-agencies/

Alex also did some analysis and had a discussion with Alamy's content manager here:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2018/02/06/do-alamy-buyers-search-elsewhere-answers-from-alamy/

The end result - I submit all my images to all sites now, but editorial and commercial and use RF on Alamy.

Steve

Interesting article. His take is different than what we were told at the Alamy Brooklyn offices by a client some years ago - and I think that both points are valid. That client said the Alamy search experience was better and they searched there first and then checked to see if what they liked on Alamy was on fotolia, suggesting, against their own best interests, that if we wanted to protect our sales, the files should just be on Alamy.

His recommendation has been borne out by my experience. I started out with Alamy.

I then applied to shutterstock using my "less than best" images - it was easier to get in back then. I had lots of micro sales, no Alamy sales early on, so I experimented putting a handful of my better images on SS and sales improved dramatically.

I joined some of the other micros, uploading many of the same images. Some of those images I uploaded back in 2009 are still selling regularly on the micros.

These images sometimes get zoomed on Alamy and purchased on SS or fotolia (the site one Alamy client said they checked to see if there were duplicates they could license more cheaply). These images have also sold occasionally on Alamy, but my experience shows that I have lost more sales with those photos than I gained on Alamy. However, since they sell very frequently on the micros, some earning me hundreds to close to and over $1,000 on the micros, micro sales may have made up for the losses - hard to know since I don't know if I lost $30 sales, $50 sales, $250 sales, or $400 sales on Alamy.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 12:52 by wordplanet »

« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2018, 12:59 »
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I license images from my own website directly to magazines, including publishers such as Time, Inc. (Coastal Living magazine) and Smithsonian. I also regularly license stock for calendars. If those images were on the micros, I think I would have a tough time licensing them for those uses. Some of these places also use micros, and if they could get my work there, why bother elsewhere? Many magazines that use both will pay $200-300 for a quarter page and that image will be right next to one they got for a subscription or perhaps a $100 EL of which we'll get $36 or less, so why give them the chance to get your photo for less? Here, I'm talking about the kind of travel images they are willing to pay more for, not concepts and backgrounds that do best on the micros and where the kind of money you can make on the micros will always top what you'd get for that kind of image on Alamy. 

I also sell fine art through galleries (and POD sites), to institutional buyers, and have been approached by a hotel, so keeping a large portion of my portfolio RM so I can control these sales is important - I'd be comfortable with high end RF since that doesn't impact my fine art sales.

If not for that, I might decide it was easier to just put everything everywhere, although I'm not sure the time and effort are worth it.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 13:03 by wordplanet »

« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2018, 14:11 »
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I license images from my own website

The trouble with that is the marketing. How do you get places like the Smithsonian to search for stuff on your website when the agencies have vastly larger collections at lower prices? OK, so you could negotiate to provide a feature on a topical subject - though the chances of them biting on that are poor. But for if they are looking for an illustration for a travel article, why would they go to you first instead of getting an image from an agency?

« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2018, 15:08 »
0
I think I'm the one that reported that I couldn't find any evidence of an Alamy buyer searching elsewhere (which is not the same thing as proving it!). Here is my latest set of analysis on the topic:

https://www.backyardsilver.com/2018/01/selling-image-alamy-agencies/

Alex also did some analysis and had a discussion with Alamy's content manager here:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2018/02/06/do-alamy-buyers-search-elsewhere-answers-from-alamy/

The end result - I submit all my images to all sites now, but editorial and commercial and use RF on Alamy.

Steve
Thank you! Now I have got a lot of information from this thread, thank you all...but I have two more questions:
If you decide to only upload to Alamy, is it better as RM or as RF?
What about illustrations on Alamy?

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2018, 18:52 »
0
Quote
If you decide to only upload to Alamy, is it better as RM or as RF?

This question is one I have pondered. From a buyers point of view, I would have thought RF was a preferable option as it is simpler to understand and buy. Logically, it should be more expensive than RM, but traditionally it was the other way and now my experience is that on Alamy at least, they are pretty much the same. If that is the case, then you have two sorts of buyers - one that doesn't care if it is RM or RF and just wants the right image. The second is one that would prefer the flexibility of RF and so would prefer an RF license if they had a choice of two images that more or less met the requirement. In my mind, therefore, an RF license lets you serve both people, an RM license is potentially a bit more restrictive in who it appeals to.

Although this has been a no-no for some time, I know don't really understand why the same image couldn't be RF on one site and RM on another these days. I can understand how exclusive RM has value in terms of control of usage etc. but non-exclusive RM doesn't really help much unless you carefully track every site you have uploaded it to. Anyway, that is probably off the point!

Steve

« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2018, 19:07 »
+2
Quote
I just wrote a series of articles that were published over the past few weeks specifically directed at people like you who are new to Alamy but who have been on the micros, and it includes examples of some of my moderate-sellers on there as well. You can find the articles here:

And thanks for the article links - I wasn't aware of Great Escape and will investigate further!

Thanks

steve

I clicked through Great Escape and you have to pay them to be a part of the operation. I stopped there. Sounds like another scam to send wannabes to micro while they make their profit off of the fee you pay them.  Really classic "anyone can do it and make good money."

« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2018, 21:39 »
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Sales on Alamy for me seem to be a pretty random event and I have no ability to predict what might or might not sell

Also the Alamy license might be closer to an EL at some places, so take that into consideration when comparing sales.

That is about my experience there as well.  For example, I had two RF sales there last week, both of which were images that were rejected by SS, although they are on some of the other micros.  I liked both of those images so I'm glad somebody bought them - they have probably been on there 4 or 5 years, maybe longer, with very little action.  Both were used for 1/4-page layouts in magazines, so like ELs on the micros.  The total sales price was around $51 and both were distributor sales so I ended up with 30% or around $15, $7.50 each.  This month I've had ELS on DT for a little over $5, at 123rf for $13 and at SS for less than $15, so all in a similar range.  RM sales at Alamy have been at similar prices except those for me have usually been straight through Alamy rather than a distributor so 50% commission.  If you're planning to limit your "best" images to Alamy keep in mind that sales there are sporadic and slow - nice when they come but it won't be often like the micros.  I don't do many backgrounds so have no idea how they will sell at Alamy, but my experience is that anything can sell there just like the micros.  Good luck!

« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2018, 01:00 »
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Quote
If you decide to only upload to Alamy, is it better as RM or as RF?

This question is one I have pondered. From a buyers point of view, I would have thought RF was a preferable option as it is simpler to understand and buy. Logically, it should be more expensive than RM, but traditionally it was the other way and now my experience is that on Alamy at least, they are pretty much the same. If that is the case, then you have two sorts of buyers - one that doesn't care if it is RM or RF and just wants the right image. The second is one that would prefer the flexibility of RF and so would prefer an RF license if they had a choice of two images that more or less met the requirement. In my mind, therefore, an RF license lets you serve both people, an RM license is potentially a bit more restrictive in who it appeals to.

Although this has been a no-no for some time, I know don't really understand why the same image couldn't be RF on one site and RM on another these days. I can understand how exclusive RM has value in terms of control of usage etc. but non-exclusive RM doesn't really help much unless you carefully track every site you have uploaded it to. Anyway, that is probably off the point!

Steve

Added to which they seem happy to sell RF images on RM licenses these days, I'm not sure if they are also selling RM as RF.
Of course, the advantage with RM is that you might get a second sale to the same client a year or two later, though even that is undermined by the super-long usage periods that some clients get.
.....
Yes, they are selling RM images on RF terms, here's one:
Country: Worldwide
Usage: Single company - multiple use editorial only
Industry sector: Education
Start: 05 September 2017
Duration: Unlimited

Here's another one which has terms pretty much indistinguishable from a micro editorial license:

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Single company - multiple use editorial only Editorial print + digital use.
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 23 October 2017
Duration: Unlimited

Mostly the standard duration for RM is five years.

And here are the details from an RF image, where the terms it's been sold under are clearly "RM":

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Commercial electronic, Websites, apps, social media and blogs (excludes advertising). Worldwide for 5 years.
Media: Website, app and social media
57 MB
5471 x 3648 pixels
1 MB compressed
Image Size: Any size
Start: 04 October 2017
End: 04 October 2022

« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2018, 05:26 »
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« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2018, 12:29 »
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I license images from my own website

The trouble with that is the marketing. How do you get places like the Smithsonian to search for stuff on your website when the agencies have vastly larger collections at lower prices? OK, so you could negotiate to provide a feature on a topical subject - though the chances of them biting on that are poor. But for if they are looking for an illustration for a travel article, why would they go to you first instead of getting an image from an agency?

My website is hosted by Photoshelter. Even though they haven't been a stock agency since 2008, many magazines still search their entire database directly. Any photographer whose site is hosted by them can make batches of their images discoverable. Those images show up whenever someone searches the entire database. With over 80,000 mostly pro photographers on there, competition is stiff but that's how they attract top magazines as well as web designers and other buyers. A few licenses a year cover the cost of my Pro account there (over 1TB file backup, client lightboxes, site hosting, print sales, etc.) and the rest is profit.

I mostly license travel and editorial photos but I've also licensed backgrounds and other concept stuff I have on the micros to web designers and individuals. And sometimes people find my images there via google rather than by searching the database. When they dropped the agency in 2008, I was just starting out as a part-time editorial photographer, so I really intended it just to set up a web site. Being able to license stock and sell prints has been an added bonus.

You can try it for 14 days via this link: https://www.photoshelter.com/referral/MA2CA7TC7J though that's really not long enough to see if you'll be able to license images.

« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2018, 03:03 »
0
Got my first sale after three months at Alamy. $12 for an RF editorial that I also have got some sales from at other sites. But another picture taken at the same time and place, which is my very best seller among editorials, wasnt approved at Alamy due to chromatic aberration. I have uploaded some three hundred pics there and only two have failed the QC, unfortunately that one. Would it be worth it to try to fix the aberration, is that allowed for editorials?

I also wonder if you use their Stockimo-app and if you have any success selling phone-photos there?

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2018, 03:14 »
0
You can certainly fix the CROWN.
For many years you had to indicate whether an image had been digitally altered or not, but now that option doesn't exist, at least for 'normal' uploads (haven't uploaded Live News for years, that maybe different (?).
In any case, you could remove dust spots, so why not CR.

« Reply #31 on: April 09, 2018, 14:55 »
0
You can certainly fix the CROWN.
For many years you had to indicate whether an image had been digitally altered or not, but now that option doesn't exist, at least for 'normal' uploads (haven't uploaded Live News for years, that maybe different (?).
In any case, you could remove dust spots, so why not CR.
Thank you!



 

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