pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Success stories on Alamy - the $100,000+ club  (Read 17701 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2018, 11:41 »
+2
If you upload the same images to Alamy and to cheap sites, people buy them on the cheap sites. Alamy can work for you if you upload your premium stuff there and only there.


« Reply #26 on: January 29, 2018, 06:07 »
+5
If you upload the same images to Alamy and to cheap sites, people buy them on the cheap sites. Alamy can work for you if you upload your premium stuff there and only there.

You should not be so sure about this. For every image you can find a microstock version even if they are not completely similar. Also for a buyer there is no guarantee that a Alamy image will be not added later to microstock. I made some high value sales on Alamy of images being in microstock. I think if someone needs a cheap image they go directly to microstock. Why search in Alamy and buy on micros instead of searching directly on micros. All those point let me think that Alamy buyers buy on Alamy for the largest part.

Mirco

« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2018, 12:08 »
+2
If you upload the same images to Alamy and to cheap sites, people buy them on the cheap sites. Alamy can work for you if you upload your premium stuff there and only there.

I disagree with this in general. I have quite an overlap of images that are both on macrostock and microstock and they sell in both worlds.

This way the customer gets all his files from one source with the exact same license and especially buyers with bigger budgets are not going to hunt it all down with the various exclusive licenses to make sure all files have the same rights.

Plus the macros offer editor services, so you dont even have to spend so much time looking  for files, they do it for you.

I wish Alamy all the best, if they give me a sensible and simple upload system I will upload directly again.

But between low sales and the complicated uploads I very discouraged. But some of my images go there via partner portals, that is a lot easier for me.

« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2018, 13:04 »
0
If you upload the same images to Alamy and to cheap sites, people buy them on the cheap sites. Alamy can work for you if you upload your premium stuff there and only there.

I disagree with this in general. I have quite an overlap of images that are both on macrostock and microstock and they sell in both worlds.

This way the customer gets all his files from one source with the exact same license and especially buyers with bigger budgets are not going to hunt it all down with the various exclusive licenses to make sure all files have the same rights.

Plus the macros offer editor services, so you dont even have to spend so much time looking  for files, they do it for you.

I wish Alamy all the best, if they give me a sensible and simple upload system I will upload directly again.

But between low sales and the complicated uploads I very discouraged. But some of my images go there via partner portals, that is a lot easier for me.

But they have the most easiest system. Images only needs keywords and title. Upload them and they are directly on sale.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2018, 13:30 »
0
But they have the most easiest system. Images only needs keywords and title. Upload them and they are directly on sale.
If you have releases, you have to go through their system after upload, otherwise they will show as not having releases.
Granted, they will be on sale as unreleased if you don't.

« Reply #30 on: January 29, 2018, 13:32 »
0

But they have the most easiest system. Images only needs keywords and title. Upload them and they are directly on sale.

True. But how much exposure do they get if the keywords aren't prioritised and if you don't fill in the optional details? If failing to prioritise your top 10 keywords pushes your image behind all the prioritised ones, then your chances of getting a sale will be greatly diminished.

If a file doesn't make the first five or six pages for a given search it is pretty much dead.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #31 on: January 29, 2018, 13:39 »
0

But they have the most easiest system. Images only needs keywords and title. Upload them and they are directly on sale.

True. But how much exposure do they get if the keywords aren't prioritised and if you don't fill in the optional details? If failing to prioritise your top 10 keywords pushes your image behind all the prioritised ones, then your chances of getting a sale will be greatly diminished.

If a file doesn't make the first five or six pages for a given search it is pretty much dead.

At the moment, I'm not sure that doing that makes all that much difference.
I'm going through my back catalogue (am at Aug 2011 now), I guess I should test to see if their system is working yet.

The most obvious thing I can see in their search right now, and for the past month at least is that they are alternating contributors, so for one search (an event) where I and one other person submitted images, they are A, B, A, B all the way down, and I just found one search term where there are only two people have submitted files, I have one, they have about 20, and it's A, B, A, A A etc. So it seems like that is a policy, in some cases at least trumping Rank.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 14:58 by ShadySue »

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2018, 14:11 »
0
Alamy is a fantastic agency, especially if you submit UK & European editorial images. Generic microstock images on white background won't do well there, unfortunately.

As stated above, their keywording system is complicated and I wish they would do a better job at explaining how it works. I've come to the conclusion that Alamy may not even know how Alamy works.

The contributors that do understand the system are doing very well (they state this publicy) and getting good keyword rankings. Alamy provide a lot of analytics so if you know how to use it and have the patience, there's huge opportunities to increase CTRs.

As for our mere mortals, coming from a MS background, it's tough going to understand it all. Their latest "upgrade" with the traffic light system was a disaster.

I feel they have a bright future ahead, although contributors are certainly feeling the pressure of lowered incomes due to over-saturation, not too different to what's going on at MS. They're probably feeling some pressure from the success of some MS agencies as well as some editorial clients are shopping around. With those threats in mind, I wouldn't be surprised if Alamy introduce some sort of subs model soon, much to the fury of veterans on there (some are already upset that Royalty-Free is available on there!).

I have a lot more to say but I'll stop here. Go Alamy go!
« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 14:18 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2018, 14:11 »
0

But they have the most easiest system. Images only needs keywords and title. Upload them and they are directly on sale.

True. But how much exposure do they get if the keywords aren't prioritised and if you don't fill in the optional details? If failing to prioritise your top 10 keywords pushes your image behind all the prioritised ones, then your chances of getting a sale will be greatly diminished.

If a file doesn't make the first five or six pages for a given search it is pretty much dead.

At the moment, I'm not sure that doing that makes all that much difference.
I'm going through my back catalogue (am at Aug 2011 now), I guess I should test to see if their system is working yet.

Yes, but uploading is not much extra effort. It is just uploading. So still worth it.

« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2018, 14:34 »
0
Alamy is a fantastic agency, especially if you submit UK & European editorial images. Generic microstock images on white background won't do well there, unfortunately.

As stated above, their keywording system is complicated and I wish they would do a better job at explaining how it works. I've come to the conclusion that Alamy may not even know how Alamy works.

The contributors that do understand the system are doing very well (they state this publicy) and getting good keyword rankings. Alamy provide a lot of analytics so if you know how to use it and have the patience, there's huge opportunities to increase CTRs.

As for our mere mortals, coming from a MS background, it's tough going to understand it all. Their latest "upgrade" with the traffic light system was a disaster.

I feel they have a bright future ahead, although contributors are certainly feeling the pressure of lowered incomes due to over-saturation, not too different to what's going on at MS. They're probably feeling some pressure from the success of some MS agencies as well. With those threats in mind, I wouldn't be surprised if Alamy introduce some sort of subs model soon, much to the fury of veterans on there (some are already upset that Royalty-Free is available on there!).

I have a lot more to say but I'll stop here. Go Alamy go!

The mind boggles at how you could come to this conclusion, which micros are making a success of subs recently.  The pressure would be the micros move to premium images and doing deals with and buying up editorial companies.

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #35 on: January 29, 2018, 14:45 »
0
Quote
The mind boggles at how you could come to this conclusion, which micros are making a success of subs recently.  The pressure would be the micros move to premium images and doing deals with and buying up editorial companies.


They cleverly called it "Download Packs". Here's a thread discussing it:

http://discussion.alamy.com/topic/7987-download-packs/

It appears to be only for personal usage at the moment.


ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2018, 14:48 »
+1
Quote
The mind boggles at how you could come to this conclusion, which micros are making a success of subs recently.  The pressure would be the micros move to premium images and doing deals with and buying up editorial companies.


They cleverly called it "Download Packs". Here's a thread discussing it:

http://discussion.alamy.com/topic/7987-download-packs/

It appears to be only for personal usage at the moment.

It's not just for personal use, all the columns are selectable.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2018, 15:00 »
+1
Alamy is a fantastic agency, especially if you submit UK & European editorial images. Generic microstock images on white background won't do well there, unfortunately.
From the sales thread, it seems that submitters of North American content seem to do better, in general (in particular, they seem to get a higher rpd).
Also one of the $100k submitters from all of the blogs has, to my great surprise, a LOT of microstock-style isolations on white.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 15:25 by ShadySue »

« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2018, 15:06 »
0
Quote
The mind boggles at how you could come to this conclusion, which micros are making a success of subs recently.  The pressure would be the micros move to premium images and doing deals with and buying up editorial companies.


They cleverly called it "Download Packs". Here's a thread discussing it:

http://discussion.alamy.com/topic/7987-download-packs/

It appears to be only for personal usage at the moment.


They have just got rid of the middleman, the negotiator who did the deals, and made them available to everyone.  This is nowhere near subs, and since istock put in a floor of 0.2C commission no one can compete in that market anymore.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2018, 15:53 »
0
They have just got rid of the middleman, the negotiator who did the deals, and made them available to everyone. 

?????

« Reply #40 on: January 29, 2018, 16:27 »
0
They have just got rid of the middleman, the negotiator who did the deals, and made them available to everyone. 

?????

At most stock sites enterprise customers get deals for bulk, these packs just democratise the practice, the prices are not new just formalised.  Lots of people complained about Alamy prices getting lower over the years and not understanding why, just discounting and now it's there for all to see.  A win win for everyone, more transparency for contributors, a one stop shop for customers and customer service can sort more important things. One thing its not is the direction of travel to competing with the micros for subs, which is what my mind was boggling at.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #41 on: January 29, 2018, 17:22 »
0
They have just got rid of the middleman, the negotiator who did the deals, and made them available to everyone. 


?????


At most stock sites enterprise customers get deals for bulk, these packs just democratise the practice, the prices are not new just formalised.  Lots of people complained about Alamy prices getting lower over the years and not understanding why, just discounting and now it's there for all to see.  A win win for everyone, more transparency for contributors, a one stop shop for customers and customer service can sort more important things. One thing its not is the direction of travel to competing with the micros for subs, which is what my mind was boggling at.


A sub could be any price.
But even (apparently) non-sub sales can be pretty low:
http://discussion.alamy.com/topic/8964-slow-month-2018/?do=findComment&comment=160105
« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 19:02 by ShadySue »

« Reply #42 on: January 30, 2018, 01:23 »
+4

The contributors that do understand the system are doing very well (they state this publicy) and getting good keyword rankings. Alamy provide a lot of analytics so if you know how to use it and have the patience, there's huge opportunities to increase CTRs.

It's all comparative but the first few posts in this thread indicate that even the most successful and professional of their contributors are lucky to be making $2,000 a month. That's nice money, of course, but it's not really a living wage in the West. People self-reporting "doing very well" can mean a lot of different things - the newbie picking up a $5 first sale tends to view him or her self as having a great achievement to report. Others like to exaggerate their success with vaguely-worded "woo-yay" type comments that paint them as stock-photo heroes.

« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2018, 01:55 »
+4
if you know how to use it and have the patience, there's huge opportunities to increase CTRs.

But if everybody does it, everybody ends up back where they started (and that's assuming it works). Which means making a huge effort to achieve nothing. There can't be 1,000 people getting their picture onto the first page of a search.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #44 on: January 30, 2018, 04:50 »
+1
Test result #1 is in:

I had a pic from 2011 featuring a particular boat. I had its name in the caption, but NOT in the keywords.
As the caption is searchable, my file was findable, at #12 of 504 on the ship's name. Not bad at all!
(NB: other photos I had of the same ship, with the name already in the keywords, but not yet as supertags, were dotted evenly throughout the search, as I've been noticing happens recently. Note that these files were below the file which didn't have the word in the keywords.)
(Creative and Relevant, which seem to be more or less the same, at least at the very top of a search)

Put the keyword as a supertag in last night. Since then the database has updated, the ship's name is now showing in the list of keywords and my pic is  ... #12 of 504!

Still, it might be of benefit in a future search shake-up.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 05:18 by ShadySue »

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2018, 05:11 »
0
Quote
There can't be 1,000 people getting their picture onto the first page of a search.


What I've discovered is that Alamy is an encyclopedic database with buyers that are searching for exactly what they want (and our job to rank highly for those). Some of the search results I see in my analytics can be quite specific. Past few days I've had the following specific search results where my images came up:

- "ear human NOT animal NOT device"
- "BMW R75 ww2"
- "1960s cafe motorcycle"
- "theresa may florence speech"
- "london bridge terror attack 2017"

Dare I say this...since Alamy buyers tend, in general, be more "sophisticated" than at Microstock, some contributors can rank highly for niche subjects by anticipating those technical keywords and similars. I'm useless at botanic stuff but some contributors on there do quite well with exotic plants and know exactly how to keyword for those niche buyers.

I picked out the following exotic flower randomly from theflowerexpert.com and cross-checked on Alamy how many results there were searching for the scientific name (Cautleya Lutea)...and only 4!

http://www.alamy.com/search.html?CreativeOn=1&adv=1&ag=0&all=1&creative=&et=0x000000000000000000000&vp=0&loc=0&qt=Cautleya%20Lutea&qn=&lic=6&lic=1&imgt=0&archive=1&dtfr=&dtto=&hc=&selectdate=&size=0xFF&aqt=&epqt=&oqt=&nqt=&gtype=0

Obviously not going to be a huge demand for this but competition is non-existent. Now, thinking more broadly about other specialist subjects...there's opportunities.

Being a specialist in one area is helpful...as well as anticipating what those buyers search for terminology. My port on there is too generalist at the moment, unfortunately, hence few downloads.

« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2018, 06:08 »
+3

Obviously not going to be a huge demand for this but competition is non-existent. Now, thinking more broadly about other specialist subjects...there's opportunities.

This is why I've never been bothered about the lack of "high commercial value" images in my portfolio. A search on "beautiful woman" produces 3.7 million results, a search on Rana cretensis produces 3 results. Now, I could photograph beautiful women till the cows come home and not have much chance of getting a sale, whereas if I go and find a Cretan frog I'll get on the first page of results and if only one-in-a-million as many buyers search for the frog as for a beautiful woman my chances of a sale will almost certainly be better for the frog than for the woman.

I've applied this theory to microstock but it probably works even better for Alamy, where the sale value if I do eventually get a hit would probably be much higher than on the micros, so a single hit could justify all the work.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2018, 07:34 »
0
In the old days, I felt that was working well for me on iS, expecially as I could plus rare-supply species, which raised the price (but made me feel guilty if they were being bought by conservation organisations). With the rapidly dropping prices, and plussing almost uniquely being for expensive multi-model shoots, it's not so good now.

I'm having to do some rethinking, though. I looked up some species for AoA, and the number of searches recorded there in the past year*, and for two specific - not unusual - species, that number is fewer than the number of sales I had of that species on iS in the same time. Plus, a unique photo on Alamy can still go for under $5 if the buyer has a good discount (I've actually had that happen).

*I understand that these searches are not 'all searches', but searches from a selection of buyers. Peers used to say on the forums (take with a pinch of salt) that AoA was 'Alamy's top buyers', but support told me it was not only the 'top' buyers, but a cross-section.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 07:52 by ShadySue »

Brasilnut

  • Author Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock & Blog

« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2018, 12:11 »
0
Quote
I've applied this theory to microstock but it probably works even better for Alamy, where the sale value if I do eventually get a hit would probably be much higher than on the micros, so a single hit could justify all the work.

Absolutely and I would add that their Alamy Live News can be highly profitable - why would anybody send live news via microstock and wait hours/days until approval is beyond me. Now, i'm starting to sound like a poster-boy for Alamy haha

$500+ licenses do occur at Alamy, although the average tends to be about gross $50-75. This is compared with the 75cents or so for Microstock (my own data).

Quote
Plus, a unique photo on Alamy can still go for under $5 if the buyer has a good discount (I've actually had that happen).

I know what you mean. I had a gross $2.20 license of a Rights-Managed last week. That's just a slap in a face.

I assume you're not duplicating and licensing those unique images RM and exclusively? I'm not so sure anymore whether being exclusive and RM on Alamy is the best strategy.

Quote
*I understand that these searches are not 'all searches', but searches from a selection of buyers. Peers used to say on the forums (take with a pinch of salt) that AoA was 'Alamy's top buyers', but support told me it was not only the 'top' buyers, but a cross-section.

Even if they're not all searches, I find the daily analytics the best part of contributing to Alamy since they're screaming at us what clients are searching for. Makes it easier to work around those keywords to earn. Last 7 days there's been 6 sales for the keyword/phrase "Masseur Doing Massage On Man Body In The Spa Salon". *, I don't have any of those images  ;D

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2018, 12:54 »
0
I assume you're not duplicating and licensing those unique images RM and exclusively? I'm not so sure anymore whether being exclusive and RM on Alamy is the best strategy.
No, exclusive RF at iStock; I haven't uploaded there for over 18 months, but because of what I wrote above, I'm reconsidering, though at an average of c$2 (in the GODs, it was more like $7), it's hardly worth the effort of learning the new uploading system.

I upload RM at Alamy, and don't upload anywhere else. My life is 'irregular': I can't make advance decisions on where to go and shoot (not that the weather here was ever conducive to that), so no chance of building up and maintaining the large numbers necessary to supply the pukka wildlife libraries, but I'm lucky in that no-one depends on me financially, only for time.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
14 Replies
4876 Views
Last post December 14, 2007, 08:06
by a.k.a.-tom
3 Replies
2748 Views
Last post July 13, 2013, 00:41
by michaeldb
0 Replies
1729 Views
Last post June 28, 2014, 12:41
by photographyplus
2 Replies
2912 Views
Last post July 11, 2014, 14:18
by Tror
Alamy- Any success??

Started by Artist « 1 2 ... 5 6 » Alamy.com

147 Replies
46833 Views
Last post October 13, 2017, 09:11
by namussi

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results