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Author Topic: advice wanted on studio lighting  (Read 3972 times)

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« on: January 31, 2007, 18:59 »
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I have decided it might be worthwhile buying a cheap flash set with umbrellas etc.

what wattage does a flash have to be for it to be worthwhile?


Greg Boiarsky

« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2007, 21:22 »
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There isn't any magic number.  But, the more light you can produce, the better.  I just purchased some Alien Bees.  They're a good value and very durable.

www.alienbees.com

If you can afford it (I couldn't), get a softbox and other light modifies and diffusers.

I have decided it might be worthwhile buying a cheap flash set with umbrellas etc.

what wattage does a flash have to be for it to be worthwhile?

« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2007, 01:37 »
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thanks they look good but ... we are 240v. Dont trust them upformers

« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2007, 01:38 »
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if you go with alien bees, the 400w/s units should supply enough power for most things including portraits and the like.  Especially if you have 2 or three flash units.

I can also second the vote that a lot of people seem to really like the alien bees and they are a very reasonable price.

« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2007, 02:50 »
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FYI, Alien Bees no longer ship to anywhere outside the US, and don't do a 240V version at all.

BTW, I use Multiblitz Profilux 600's which are great, although possibly a bit pricy for a first set of lights...  (We're 240V here in NZ as well)

« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2007, 03:13 »
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FYI, Alien Bees no longer ship to anywhere outside the US, and don't do a 240V version at all.


oh! :(


« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2007, 03:15 »
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I have decided it might be worthwhile buying a cheap flash set with umbrellas etc.

what wattage does a flash have to be for it to be worthwhile?

Back to your question in that case.  If you find lamps that are 250w/s they will be fine for product photography or 1 person portraits and the like in a small studio.  They might be a little weak for bigger things and you might end up, upgrading but it could be an alright purchase to see how you like it, and to tie you over until you can afford / want anything larger.

« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2007, 03:47 »
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FYI, Alien Bees no longer ship to anywhere outside the US, and don't do a 240V version at all.

...

Dang!

Greg Boiarsky

« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2007, 12:17 »
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Oops, you got this one wrong.  They do ship overseas (but don't offer online ordering) and they offer advice on transformers for converting 120 to 240.

http://www.alienbees.com/intsales.html
http://www.alienbees.com/nonus.html

FYI, Alien Bees no longer ship to anywhere outside the US, and don't do a 240V version at all.

BTW, I use Multiblitz Profilux 600's which are great, although possibly a bit pricy for a first set of lights...  (We're 240V here in NZ as well)

« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2007, 14:08 »
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I use Elinchrom Style Fx-400 series light (220v). They cost around 1000 with stands, umbrellas, softbox and a hard case. There is also a cheaper light units made by Elinchroms (d-lite2 and d-lite-4) and the price is for these items are starting from ~600euros....

I'm happy with style-fx series light. Nothing more is needed at my skill level :)

br, Mikko P.

Photoguy

« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2007, 16:33 »
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FYI, Alien Bees no longer ship to anywhere outside the US, and don't do a 240V version at all.

BTW, I use Multiblitz Profilux 600's which are great, although possibly a bit pricy for a first set of lights...  (We're 240V here in NZ as well)

They still send to Canada..............I have the B800 & B1600.......I think the B400 is a little weak, good for table top, blowing out white backgrounds and hair light. With the B1600 & a large softbox I'm getting f16 on half power.

w7lwi

  • Those that don't stand up to evil enable evil.
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2007, 17:29 »
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What I was taught for studio portrait lighting was, at a minimum, to have one 650W main light and two 350W, fill and back lights.  In some cases you'll need more, primarily for lighting whatever backdrop you have, but these, along with various reflectors, should get you by for most circumstances.  These would be for a single person portrait.  For full body or group shots, you'll probably need either more lights or higher wattage fixtures.  Like professorgb says, the more light, the better.  At least until your model begins to develop burns or cancer from exposure. :D

Also, these are photography lights, not cheap tungsten or halogen lights that use up their wattage in heat, rather than lumens.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2007, 17:32 by w7lwi »

« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2007, 00:23 »
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Be sure to check out the performance on the cheaper lights, too. The output of Alien Bees, for example, can vary as much as 1/3 stop from flash to flash (which is why the same manufacturer makes a professional line called "White Lightning").

You get what you pay for ...

Greg Boiarsky

« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2007, 01:14 »
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This variance is true of most lighting, although maybe not as much as 1/3 stop.  I think that the 1/3-stop variance you're referring to occurs when the output power is cut significantly.  At those low outputs, all lights vary a lot more, both in power output and color temperature.

The output of Alien Bees, for example, can vary as much as 1/3 stop from flash to flash (which is why the same manufacturer makes a professional line called "White Lightning").

You get what you pay for ...

Microstock InsiderPhotoDune

 

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