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Author Topic: Color grading and basic video edits for stock  (Read 487 times)

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« on: November 28, 2017, 02:55 »
0
What edits do you make before you upload video for stock? I'm using after effects since that allows me to edit multiple videos on one go. What i currently do
1. Stabilizing
2. Contrast and saturation.
3. Curves editing

What I'd want to do and want advise on
1. Color grading
2. Something similar to the split toning of lightroom
3. Gradient filters similar to light room
4. Selective color saturation

What else should i be doing to get a good shot? Do i incorporate movement into shots? Do i keep locked on shots? How do i become a better videographer?


« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2017, 03:26 »
+1
What else should i be doing to get a good shot? Do i incorporate movement into shots? Do i keep locked on shots? How do i become a better videographer?

What should you do to create a good song? About a million things.

The short answer is: it depends.

Any movie you see uses a combination of shots, locked down, push, pull, aerial, handheld etc. for variation and expression of emotion.

How do you become a better videographer? By filming every day and studying people you look up to. Analyze films, commercials, good YouTube videos.

A slow-paced movie may use mostly tripod shots. A fast action movie may use a lot of handheld shots.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 05:14 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2017, 12:38 »
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I know its like an ocean. But what would you tell a beginner. Especially a long the points i mentioned

« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2017, 13:18 »
+1
2 and 3 of what you currently do are essentially the same thing. Curves can be used for contrast. It's a very versatile tool.

1, 2, 3, and 4 of what you want advice on are all color grading. The tools are all in After Effects. For example, use a solid with a feathered mask for a gradient. Or just use the gradient ramp.

Important to remember is that color grading is very subjective. It's done to taste. No one can tell you exactly what to do, but you can watch countless videos on YouTube with examples of color grading. You can color grade just using curves.

A general tip is that shadows are usually quite desaturated compared to the midtones. So are highlights. That can be something that makes it look more professional.

Color CORRECTION on the other hand is a bit more objective, getting the right exposure and white balance.

You have to make a decision on every shot. Is it a shot that shows natural, everyday life in the city? Then maybe a natural look is best. Just color correction, no or minimal color grading.

Is it a slow motion shot of a tiger jumping through fire, then maybe a cinematic look can look good.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2017, 13:22 by increasingdifficulty »


 

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