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Author Topic: DPC and Adobe stock now.  (Read 3731 times)

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« on: July 04, 2016, 02:50 »
0
Hello! It feels that i lost somewhere and missed the change. DPC is history now, however does all my uploads on fotolia now goes to adobe stock ? Keeping loosing like 400$ every month since DPC close, so im not sure if my work goes into adobe stock now or not. Can i somewhere see what is selling there ?


« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2016, 02:57 »
0
Well, I guess you can go to Adobe stock site and search for your files there and compare your port there with port on Fotolia.

« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2016, 03:12 »
0
The same number here.

« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2016, 03:35 »
0
Same here.
Not $400, but around $200 less :(

« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2016, 07:23 »
+16
Dollar Photo Club was the worst thing that happened to all of us microstockers!
I am glad Adobe killed it!
« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 04:56 by Karen »

« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2016, 09:05 »
+3
I'm up since DPC closed it doors. Good riddance to bad rubbish.

« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2016, 09:10 »
+1
I have less downloads since DPC's gone but higher RPD.


« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2016, 09:55 »
+1
I have less DLs and $ but I don't know if this is due to DPC closure or not, because DPC closed in April and my May earnings were good. June was realy poor for me.

« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2016, 02:56 »
+3
Dollar Photo Club was the worst thing that happened to all of us microstockers.
I am glad Adobe killed it!

Im not sure how loss of 400$ every month can be good. But i guess its just you, who happy.

« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2016, 04:31 »
+4
Are you blind? how do you think "dpc was worst.." Probably you were opted out and don't know how it works. My downloads 2000+ per month  before the april  now 1300 DL  per month and my loss 300usd+ ,Yes adobe killed Dpc and Us

« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2016, 04:42 »
+5
Well obviously it didn't kill everyone as many people are reporting increased income since its closure. Of course the people who opted in to DPC are seeing less DLs. It was an ultra low priced site so had a big volume of DLs for low RPD. You also would have benefited from decreased competition as anyone with any sense opted out. Also its summer, so forget about comparing April to now.

« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2016, 04:53 »
0
I disagree with big volume of sales with low RPD. I had less sales at FT than at SS, but earned more...

« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2016, 04:57 »
0
I disagree with big volume of sales with low RPD. I had less sales at FT than at SS, but earned more...

I mean on DPC not FL in general. DPC = lower RPD and more sales than FL main site

« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2016, 05:37 »
+4
I disagree with big volume of sales with low RPD. I had less sales at FT than at SS, but earned more...

I mean on DPC not FL in general. DPC = lower RPD and more sales than FL main site

Sometimes i just dont understand, maybe i am just stupid, but whats the * difference between more sells for small price or less sells for big price, if in the end you freaking losing almost 500$ every month in general? Some people thinking abilities shock me.

« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2016, 05:43 »
+10
Are you blind? how do you think "dpc was worst.." Probably you were opted out and don't know how it works. My downloads 2000+ per month  before the april  now 1300 DL  per month and my loss 300usd+ ,Yes adobe killed Dpc and Us

Do you know how it worked?

DPC was selling at discount prices and paying subscription royalties.
The whole business idea was undercutting the on-demand sales of other sites to gain marketshare, mainly in the US market.
So the 300 USD you were making (you're saying 700 sales) were likely costing other photographers (and you) 1000 - 2000 USD revenue on other sites.

As usual in business, when someone starts a price war they will see increased turnover in the short term. But it's terrible for the whole business in the long term.

It's good that it's gone.

Shelma1

« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2016, 06:18 »
+9
Not to mention that you were getting more sales than you normally would have because so many people opted out, leaving you with less competition. So you made a bunch of extra money for a while during a time when many people sacrificed that income for a larger ideal.

Goodbye and good riddance, DPC.

« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2016, 07:05 »
+4
I disagree with big volume of sales with low RPD. I had less sales at FT than at SS, but earned more...

I mean on DPC not FL in general. DPC = lower RPD and more sales than FL main site

Sometimes i just dont understand, maybe i am just stupid, but whats the * difference between more sells for small price or less sells for big price, if in the end you freaking losing almost 500$ every month in general? Some people thinking abilities shock me.

Okay I'll bite.

Someone was complaining that their download numbers were lower, I was making the point that a large volume of downloads doesn't necessarily mean more income as it it a high volume low RPD site (DPC). If the downloads are taking sales away from higher RPD sites you may be losing more than you gain. Seems like many people were as many of us have seen an increase in income since DPC closed their doors.

If you can't compete on the open market and need the advantage of half the people refusing to join the sites you sell on for pennies on then maybe DPC was the right place for your portfolio.

 

« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2016, 07:28 »
0
After April, I see some increase of ODD in SS. This might be due to the closure of DPC. Those customers should go somewhere.

« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2016, 07:32 »
0
Not to mention that you were getting more sales than you normally would have because so many people opted out, leaving you with less competition. So you made a bunch of extra money for a while during a time when many people sacrificed that income for a larger ideal.

Goodbye and good riddance, DPC.

If my memory is correct, you had mentioned that SUBs created a previously nonexistent market. Imagine what will happen if every site stop SUBs or majority of the contributors avoid SUB sites...

Shelma1

« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2016, 07:48 »
+5
Not to mention that you were getting more sales than you normally would have because so many people opted out, leaving you with less competition. So you made a bunch of extra money for a while during a time when many people sacrificed that income for a larger ideal.

Goodbye and good riddance, DPC.

If my memory is correct, you had mentioned that SUBs created a previously nonexistent market. Imagine what will happen if every site stop SUBs or majority of the contributors avoid SUB sites...

Yes. I also mentioned that sub sites were for "amateurs," like me, and opened up a market of buyers who couldn't previously afford to license high-qualty stock images. Then "pros" flooded the sub sites with high-quality work to outcompete the amateurs, which brought down the prices for professional work.

There's no other market left, because anyone can afford subs. So making all images available for a dollar with no commitment just steals sales from sub sites...it does not open up any new markets.

« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2016, 08:45 »
0
"amateurs," like me

That must be a joke  ;D

« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2016, 10:27 »
+11
... Some people thinking abilities shock me.

I think you're missing a lot of context and history and looking solely at your drop in sales.

I'm not sure as I don't sell at Fotolia any more, but I thought that you could not separate DPC sales from sales through Adobe Stock or Fotolia's own site except for guesswork based on the amount of the sale. If that's the case, while the drop is not in dispute, the cause may be.

As far as the history part of it, the toxic part of DPC, which is wholly and completely different from the introduction of microstock back in 2000 (ish), is that DPC was designed to undercut other players by swiping customers and did not expand the pool of buyers in any way.

Microstock changed the sourcing of images (larger group of contributors from a much wider circle geographically), the platform for selling them (the internet with largely automated platforms open 24/7/365) and the prices - small businesses, non-profits and other groups who couldn't possibly afford the big-budget prices of Getty, Corbis, Jupiter Images et al. flocked to the micros and expanded the market for purchase of stock images and illustrations.

Subscription were not new with microstock sites, but the model that they offered was a commitment to a high volume of images on a regular basis - 750 a month, initially limited to 25 a day versus whenever you liked - $199 a month but only if you committed to that for a year.

DPC gave away the content for essentially no commitment at all - all that transparent rubbish about limit who could "join" was pathetic marketing sleight of hand. No new buyer pool, no innovation of any kind. Just a hope to draw away buyers from other sites.

Your DPC cash (if that's what it was) would have dried up anyway - if it hadn't been DPC being shut down it would have been when the next DPC-like scuzz buckets undercut DPC using similar tactics. Any boost in your income was inevitably going to be temporary as this thieving of other sites customers by cutting prices is truly not a sustainable business long term.

Fortunately, other people saw DPC for the cancer it was and tried (with some success) to cut off its blood supply - content for the collection. Millions of images left Fotolia when they foolishly said at first that was the only way to opt out of DPC.

So yes, some people's thinking does shock me too - just not the same thinking that shocks you.

« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2016, 12:41 »
+1
Are you blind? how do you think "dpc was worst.." Probably you were opted out and don't know how it works. My downloads 2000+ per month  before the april  now 1300 DL  per month and my loss 300usd+ ,Yes adobe killed Dpc and Us
Are you blind? DPC is closed for contributions and new customers for over a year!
Why do you count your overall income? DPC had very special prices, so you can easily count it's share. I bet, it's much lower than 30% you talking about.


 

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