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Author Topic: Fotolia and Adobe unfair extended video license price  (Read 4288 times)

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SpaceStockFootage

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« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2017, 19:16 »
+1
Try importing images (16 bit tiff) for a 30 second 25fps hyperlapse clip --> 750 images. Now stabilize position, rotation, add warp stabilizer once, twice, deflicker footage, add pixel motion blur. If you can get it to render below 15 minutes, you're a magician. It's more like 1h15min. And that's just the render time. 1080p is more than 4x faster in these circumstances.

Oh yes. On some hyperlapses I can spend two full days. It's extremely time consuming (especially if you were a bit lazy when taking the pictures)...

But here's a tip: Skip the tiff images step and work with RAW in After Effects. Saves time and space.

All valid points!


« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2017, 05:56 »
+2
I export TIFF from Lightroom and batch rename in Bridge because I always thought That AE does not accept RAW or DNG, I even tried doing it at first and it did not work.
If I could read RAW as a sequence it would save me tons of time. Maybe the trick is to Save Metadata to File?

Yes, just choose Import > File and choose the first RAW image.

You don't need to edit in Lightroom first and save the XMP files, you can just edit the first image in AE and the rest will use the same settings.
Wow, it does work!!! It must be a new function in recent months.
Thanks a lot.
This will save me tons of time and also I will get better quality by avoiding going through the file conversion to TIFF

« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2017, 06:12 »
+1
I import raw files in ae for over year now, so it isn't new.
Same camera raw module as in Photoshop

« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2017, 09:54 »
+1
Wow, it does work!!! It must be a new function in recent months.
Thanks a lot.
This will save me tons of time and also I will get better quality by avoiding going through the file conversion to TIFF

Like GooDween said, it's not new. You probably just missed it that's all.  ;D

Anyway, I'm glad it works for you now so you can skip the tiff step altogether.

« Reply #29 on: February 16, 2017, 13:42 »
0
I've just tried that workflow, but noticed that scrubbing through the timeline and other adjustment take waaaay longer compared to a tiff or jpg export. So I'm not really sure if it's faster. Just previewing a 5 second clip takes more than 5 minutes* to render all the frames (at "quarter" quality).

*Edit: actually 17 minutes
« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 14:02 by spike »

« Reply #30 on: February 16, 2017, 14:01 »
0
I've just tried that workflow, but noticed that scrubbing through the timeline and other adjustment take waaaay longer compared to a tiff or jpg export. So I'm not really sure if it's faster. Just previewing a 5 second clip takes more than 5 minutes to render all the frames (at "quarter" quality).
Obviously rendering RAW files is much more demanding than TIFF, so it depends on your PC capabilities, especially the amount of RAM (and the amount dedicated to AE).
I have a powerful PC with 32 GB of RAM and previewing a timelapse of 15 seconds in RAW takes less than30 seconds.
I really would like to extend to 64 GB

« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2017, 14:05 »
0
Obviously rendering RAW files is much more demanding than TIFF, so it depends on your PC capabilities, especially the amount of RAM (and the amount dedicated to AE).
I have a powerful PC with 32 GB of RAM and previewing a timelapse of 15 seconds in RAW takes less than30 seconds.
I really would like to extend to 64 GB

i7 4970K, 16gb ram, gtx 760.

And it took me 17 minutes to preview a 5 second timelapse clip (with position and scale keyframed).

I don't know what config I should have to reduce that time from 17 minutes to less than 30 seconds. Especially since there isn't much of a difference between haswell and skylake/kaby lake regarding performance.

How many cores do you have on your processor? Which graphics card?

Also I'd like to add that each of the raw files has its own .xmp, because I processed the sequence in lrtimelapse first.

« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2017, 14:08 »
0
It takes around 20 minutes to export it as a 4k mov, so only 3 minutes longer than the preview  ???

Strange.

« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2017, 14:34 »
0
It takes around 20 minutes to export it as a 4k mov, so only 3 minutes longer than the preview  ???

Strange.
As far as I know the graphic card doesn't play a big role.
The main thing is how much RAM you have assigned to AE. I have 26GB just for AE and Media encoder

« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2017, 15:44 »
0
my workflow with timelapse looks like, import all in ae, render out in native resolution as lossless vide, and then reimport and work with it. So pretty much the same as tiff but without many pictures in sequence.
camera raw is very slow.
even on my 5960x with 64gb of ram.
davinci resolve is much faster in raw import, almost real time preview
« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 15:47 by GooDween »

« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2017, 15:50 »
0
Davinci resolve also reads associated xmp files?

« Reply #36 on: February 16, 2017, 16:15 »
0
I've just tried that workflow, but noticed that scrubbing through the timeline and other adjustment take waaaay longer compared to a tiff or jpg export. So I'm not really sure if it's faster. Just previewing a 5 second clip takes more than 5 minutes* to render all the frames (at "quarter" quality).

*Edit: actually 17 minutes

Yes, it takes about as long as it takes to export the tiffs, quite naturally.

Like I mentioned before, the point is to export directly to a .mov file (for example ProRes 422 (HQ), thereby skipping the image sequence export.

Then you work with the ProRes movie file. You will go crazy if you try stabilizing, grading, cutting etc. directly on the RAW images.

« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2017, 16:32 »
0
ae can crash especially if raw files are huge like from 7r mk2.

« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2017, 16:36 »
0

Yes, it takes about as long as it takes to export the tiffs, quite naturally.

Like I mentioned before, the point is to export directly to a .mov file (for example ProRes 422 (HQ), thereby skipping the image sequence export.

Then you work with the ProRes movie file. You will go crazy if you try stabilizing, grading, cutting etc. directly on the RAW images.

Can't export ProRes 422 HQ since I'm not on a mac.

I'll try with Davinci resolve.

« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2017, 16:54 »
0
Can't export ProRes 422 HQ since I'm not on a mac.

I'll try with Davinci resolve.

Doesn't HAVE to be ProRes of course, I'm sure other high-quality formats will work just fine.

« Reply #40 on: February 22, 2017, 04:41 »
0
Quicktime - Photo jpeg

Davinci resolve will not give you ProRes i think only the pro can on windows



Can't export ProRes 422 HQ since I'm not on a mac.

I'll try with Davinci resolve.

Doesn't HAVE to be ProRes of course, I'm sure other high-quality formats will work just fine.


 

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