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Author Topic: How to improve pictures to make them acceptable?  (Read 726 times)

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« on: November 07, 2018, 14:12 »
0
When I started getting interested in photography 20 years ago I was doing a lot of foreign travel for my job, which took me to some awesome places where I could capture images of unusual things.   The problem was, back then digital camera technology was still in it's infancy and I was not rich enough to buy the best stuff on the market. I bought what was considered great equipment in it's day and it cost a pretty penny, but by today's standards, it is would severely lacking.  But it was what I had, and I was able to take a lot of nice pictures with it.  Many of these images are so rare, nobody in micro stock or macro stock has them for sale.  My problem is, due to technical issues, most of them cannot get approved for sale. 

What I am looking for is creative ways to get them to pass.  Let me give you an example.   Here is a picture I would very much get approved of a Rooster-tail Cicada (fulgorid planthopper).  There are not pictures of a real fulgorid planthopper on the micro stock websites I have checked.  That search brings of a Pyrops candelaria, which is a completely different class of insect.

These shots have been rejected by every micro stock site I have tried, except for Deamstime, which I think, just accepts everything.  They have been rejected by shutterstock, 123RF, and adobe stock.  These are truly unique and I think it is worth trying to improve it them I can find a way to do it.  I am just not that good at advanced photos editing tricks.







cascoly

  • Photography, travel & online games at cascoly.com

« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2018, 14:24 »
+1
nice pix of a weird beastie

what's the resolution off the actual pix?  I had an early digital camera that produced excellent results, but wrote to floppy disks @ 640 x 480, so I have several years worth of images I cant sell thru agencies

if the images are of low resolution you might combine 4 or 6 images into one array, but otherwise there's not much you can do

« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2018, 01:45 »
+2
If you have small but decent (sharp, well lit, little noise) images, making a collage/array/group is a reasonable option (I've done that with a number of things and they can sell).

Dreamstime is largely useless as it sells so little these days that it would help you to have the images there.

However, I do think you should give some consideration to the marketability of your images before investing time in processing them for upload anywhere. Having a rare image is only important if anyone wants to buy the image.

Stock images have to be useful to designers and sometimes things are rare in an agency collection because no one buys that sort of thing. There might be a few biology text books that would purchase a few insect images, but what else could you use it for?

Often, with stock images, it's the usual image, not the unusual one that will become a big seller.

« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2018, 08:24 »
0
Interesting pictures! Aside biology books they could sell for newspapers and magazines, just think of climate change, more and more of species becoming endangered...

Whatever you do, keep the colors as natural as possible. These insects are rare so I would treat these images like editorial in post production. Resize them, if there are problems with sharpness. Meticulous keywording and writing a killer caption would probably be your best weapon. If you have many shots don't crop all as close ups, it would be good to see the environment these bugs live in.

Have you tried Bigstock? They accept smaller images and sell pretty nicely.








« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2018, 08:36 »
0
I think what you are saying is correct Jo Ann.  I had though about those points. A niche market is great, as long as there is a market.

You are also correct about the usual things being good sellers.  Some of my most popular sellers are if prickly pear cactus and yucca plants.  For the life of me, I don't know who would buy them and for what.  And I guess that is kind of my hope with these exclusive insect pictures I have.  Maybe there is a market out there I don't know about.


Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2018, 09:17 »
0
Unless these insects have blue/green tints on parts, I'd say white balance correction would be useful. Maybe something as easy as a LED ring "flash" (they have continuous also) for fill. They aren't expensive. Example:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/48pcs-LED-Ring-Flash-Light-RF550D-8-Adapter-Rings-for-Nikon-Canon-DSLR-Camera/283120035805?hash=item41eb44e7dd:g:d88AAOSwYFtbfsz4:rk:13:pf:0

Under $30 delivered. They actually work.


« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2018, 18:09 »
0
If you have small but decent (sharp, well lit, little noise) images, making a collage/array/group is a reasonable option (I've done that with a number of things and they can sell).

Dreamstime is largely useless as it sells so little these days that it would help you to have the images there.

However, I do think you should give some consideration to the marketability of your images before investing time in processing them for upload anywhere. Having a rare image is only important if anyone wants to buy the image.

Stock images have to be useful to designers and sometimes things are rare in an agency collection because no one buys that sort of thing. There might be a few biology text books that would purchase a few insect images, but what else could you use it for?


Often, with stock images, it's the usual image, not the unusual one that will become a big seller.


Could you give me a sample of what you are talking when it comes to a collage.  Are you talking about something like this example?


ShadySue

« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2018, 18:42 »
+1
The thing is that someone wanting a rare image probably won't look at micro first (partly because of so many poor identification and too much spamming), but the agencies which specialise in e.g. rare wildlife usually have requirements including a large initial submission and the promise of 'so many' images to be submitted per month or per quarter; they don't usually (none that I know of, but there must be many I haven't even heard of, I mean the ones who are named in nature publications I read) take one 'odd' photo, even of a very rare creature.

« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2018, 19:49 »
0
Unless these insects have blue/green tints on parts, I'd say white balance correction would be useful. Maybe something as easy as a LED ring "flash" (they have continuous also) for fill. They aren't expensive. Example:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/48pcs-LED-Ring-Flash-Light-RF550D-8-Adapter-Rings-for-Nikon-Canon-DSLR-Camera/283120035805?hash=item41eb44e7dd:g:d88AAOSwYFtbfsz4:rk:13:pf:0

Under $30 delivered. They actually work.

Hummm...?  Not sure if you read my original post.  How is a flash going to help pictures that were taken 15 years ago?

cascoly

  • Photography, travel & online games at cascoly.com

« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2018, 23:14 »
0

Could you give me a sample of what you are talking when it comes to a collage.  Are you talking about something like this example?

yes

Shadow Creation

  • Photo Editing Expert
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2018, 04:57 »
0
Really very much interesting for me. Because I am a photo editor but love to capture for create my archive.
Thanks Again :) :) :) 

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2018, 10:00 »
0
Unless these insects have blue/green tints on parts, I'd say white balance correction would be useful. Maybe something as easy as a LED ring "flash" (they have continuous also) for fill. They aren't expensive. Example:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/48pcs-LED-Ring-Flash-Light-RF550D-8-Adapter-Rings-for-Nikon-Canon-DSLR-Camera/283120035805?hash=item41eb44e7dd:g:d88AAOSwYFtbfsz4:rk:13:pf:0

Under $30 delivered. They actually work.

Hummm...?  Not sure if you read my original post.  How is a flash going to help pictures that were taken 15 years ago?

Not going to help, sorry, but you asked how to get photos accepted, I slipped past the, old pre-digital. You do need to adjust the color balance so white parts aren't blue. You can do that in the editor. If you were to shoot more, get the fill flash.

Also I don't know how big the chickens Etc. originals are, but they are cropped way to close, even for a collage, there needs to be some space around images. Not saying everything should be far and loose and leave room for copy, but too close means it's an object stuck in tight, not usually a good way to get sales.

Nice photos! Making old photos into digital is terribly difficult. I have thousands, I just don't bother.


« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2018, 10:11 »
0
...If you have small but decent (sharp, well lit, little noise) images, making a collage/array/group is a reasonable option (I've done that with a number of things and they can sell)...

Could you give me a sample of what you are talking when it comes to a collage.  Are you talking about something like this example?

Sort of. If you make an interesting looking collection with a clear theme it works best (these examples aren't my work, just stuff I found on SS)




« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2018, 15:46 »
0
Jo Ann if your files are to small from the old technology , Topaz AI Gigapixel is magic pixey dust that really works great to upsize. I know you are not suppose to upsize but this software is really special. I think the cost is 60-70 bucks and worth ever penny. It is worth trying as I have found all the Topaz plugins are very special pixey dust which have made a lot of money for me. Good luck, your examples look very cool.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #14 on: Yesterday at 08:52 »
+1
Just a personal comment. If someone makes collages, they might get a sub download, so we can sell 9-12 or more images for one crummy sub? Kind of inspires me to dream of the race to the bottom, and how to make less by giving away groups of images, instead of selling singles?



Yes if all one has is a bunch of under sized shots, why not, but I'm not ready to work editing, sell out with a collage, just to get a crappy sub.

The image is just to say, even the sliced tomato crowd is grasping for downloads now. Collage of tomato slices? How low can someone go?  :)

Of course the buyers will love this, they can stock up cheap.


 

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