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Author Topic: pricing question  (Read 1459 times)

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eyeCatchLight

  • Imagination is more important than knowledge.
« on: August 10, 2010, 07:00 »
0
I was asked to photograph metal furniture for a company. I'll meet them later this week to see how much that is.

My question is, how do you photographers price such jobs? By the hour? Maybe it wouldn't be fair because I'd need a little more time, I have never been lighting reflective surfaces like this. What is it that I can ask for, and in which way do you usually charge?

Concerning the lighting I thought of isolating those metal furniture pieces (it's for a catalogue) with white backdrop blown out. The reflection may be handled with large softbox and white cardboard left and right to get some white into the metal maybe. What do you think?

Thanks,
Simone


« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2010, 07:50 »
0
Sounds like there are a lot of fires to be put out.  :-\

Pro photographers have spread sheets of of monthly costs, expenses, number of jobs and how much those pay in order to keep track of what their work is worth. If you don't know what your work is worth, it's getting complicated.

Such a job would hardly be handled on an hourly basis. More of a day rate or even (if you have experience in this) a flat fee for the whole project.

Next thing is the lighting/reflections. It will help you to actually have a look at the pieces you are supposed to photograph. It could be brushed metal which would be a little easier to handle than polished chrome surfaces.

In any case, the internet is loaded with tons of tutorials, youtube videos and other tips how to take picture of highly reflective objects. It can get quite complicated with those things.

This would also be something to consider when calculating your day rate (or final cost). Shoots of this caliber require proper preparation. Lots of exchange with the client to achieve their vision and knowing what your part will be to get there.

It's nearly impossible to throw a number at you what you should be charging. Some photographers are happy with $200 in their pocket at the end of the day, others won't even pack their camera bag for the job if they don't get at least $6000 a day (plus equipment rentals, props, MUAs, models etc.).

Looks like a god opportunity to jump into the water with this one and see how it pans out. Good luck!

eyeCatchLight

  • Imagination is more important than knowledge.
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2010, 08:42 »
0
Sounds like there are a lot of fires to be put out.  :-\

Pro photographers have spread sheets of of monthly costs, expenses, number of jobs and how much those pay in order to keep track of what their work is worth. If you don't know what your work is worth, it's getting complicated.


Guess what, I am at the beginning with commercial photography.... I have a set of rates for other situations - portraits, events, weddings. But this is the first shoot of such a type, and of course it is hard to find a rate.


Such a job would hardly be handled on an hourly basis. More of a day rate or even (if you have experience in this) a flat fee for the whole project.


ok...no hourly basis then....


Next thing is the lighting/reflections. It will help you to actually have a look at the pieces you are supposed to photograph. It could be brushed metal which would be a little easier to handle than polished chrome surfaces.

In any case, the internet is loaded with tons of tutorials, youtube videos and other tips how to take picture of highly reflective objects. It can get quite complicated with those things.


I guess I am more comfortable for the technical aspect. I am confident to handle it, but I'll read up a lot I guess. It is brushed I think, luckily I think not polished metal.


This would also be something to consider when calculating your day rate (or final cost). Shoots of this caliber require proper preparation. Lots of exchange with the client to achieve their vision and knowing what your part will be to get there.

It's nearly impossible to throw a number at you what you should be charging. Some photographers are happy with $200 in their pocket at the end of the day, others won't even pack their camera bag for the job if they don't get at least $6000 a day (plus equipment rentals, props, MUAs, models etc.).


I am meeting the client later this week and I will get a better idea. However, I think at that meeting they expect at least an estimate of a number I can throw at them, and I am just lost.
I will not do this job for 200$. Not for 6000$ either of course. But I am wondering what would be a reasonable amount for a day or half-day rate (depending on how much I will have to shoot)?
Sorry, I am just kinda new to commercial product photogaphy.

Thanks,
Simone


Looks like a god opportunity to jump into the water with this one and see how it pans out. Good luck!

yes indeed. i will not turn it down.
last time they called me to photograph at the Black Eyed Peas concert in our big concert hall, huge event, I was hired by Blackberry. wouhou. You just need to go and do it.

« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2010, 08:58 »
0
last time they called me to photograph at the Black Eyed Peas concert in our big concert hall, huge event, I was hired by Blackberry. wouhou. You just need to go and do it.

Good for you! Way to go.

OM

« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2010, 18:58 »
0
I was asked to photograph metal furniture for a company. I'll meet them later this week to see how much that is.

My question is, how do you photographers price such jobs? By the hour? Maybe it wouldn't be fair because I'd need a little more time, I have never been lighting reflective surfaces like this. What is it that I can ask for, and in which way do you usually charge?

Concerning the lighting I thought of isolating those metal furniture pieces (it's for a catalogue) with white backdrop blown out. The reflection may be handled with large softbox and white cardboard left and right to get some white into the metal maybe. What do you think?

Thanks,
Simone

Depending on many factors, I would investigate the possibility of renting a (local) studio with an egg-shaped cove; the type used for car shots. With spotlights directed at the walls ceiling and floor, reflections/highlights can be controlled perfectly. Not a cheap option though.

eyeCatchLight

  • Imagination is more important than knowledge.
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2010, 07:41 »
0


Depending on many factors, I would investigate the possibility of renting a (local) studio with an egg-shaped cove; the type used for car shots. With spotlights directed at the walls ceiling and floor, reflections/highlights can be controlled perfectly. Not a cheap option though.

no...i can't, they have all their stuff there. i will just do a standard white backdrop thing i guess.
but that egg-shaped idea is really good for other things. product shoots in small format also i guess.

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