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Author Topic: Adobe change account to EUROS  (Read 3230 times)

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« on: May 04, 2018, 07:12 »
0
I don't suppose anyone knows how to change my portfolio earnings from GBP to EUROS?

I think my Fotolia page is in Euros already.

TIA
Suz :)


« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2018, 13:36 »
0
Send a message to Matt he works for Adobe/Fotolia and he's always on the Adobe forum here

http://www.microstockgroup.com/profile/?u=1879

« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2018, 21:28 »
+1
In the past they wouldn't change you to a currency that was more profitable for you. In other words they were paying some people less.

« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2018, 03:27 »
+1
Thanks all! :) Will message them

AnS

« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2018, 03:36 »
0
Wow, please, let us know if it turns out to be possible!

I am in the same situation, it would be so great to change GBP to EUR! In the past it was automatic (it all depended on the domain you registered - uk. or eu.) and you just found out when it came to payment, without a way to change it.  :-\

« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2018, 17:20 »
0
I am in the same situation but I want to change it from GBP to dollars.  As far as I know it is not possible, even though that should be an easy change for a programmer to make.  If you find a way please let us know.

« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2018, 03:54 »
0
Hi, got a reply. Apparently I set my account from Fotolia uk (I must have just picked the English version) even though I live in Spain.

"Sadly, once the account is created on a Fotolia zone and assigned to a currency, it is not possible to change it. This affects also your Adobe Stock account, since it was migrated from Fotolia."

Suz

« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2018, 04:15 »
+1
As far as I know it is not possible, even though that should be an easy change for a programmer to make.

It may be an easy change for a programmer, but it's a difficult one for an accounter, since they are shortchanging us by a considerable amount this way: €1 = £0.88 at the moment (a long one) but they are only paying £0.75
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 04:20 by klheyeyere »

« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2018, 04:36 »
0
As far as I know it is not possible, even though that should be an easy change for a programmer to make.

It may be an easy change for a programmer, but it's a difficult one for an accounter, since they are shortchanging us by a considerable amount this way: €1 = £0.88 at the moment (a long one) but they are only paying £0.75

You seem to be confusing Euros with Pounds sterling in your comment.

However for the previous months the exchange was £1/$1.46 or 0.68

At the moment it's £1/1.36 or 0.735

So a contributor in the UK is actually doing well out of this
« Last Edit: May 07, 2018, 04:39 by Sammy the Cat »

« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2018, 15:57 »
+1
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2018, 03:09 »
0
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

Funny the last I heard was the exchange rate movement was caused by the strengthening dollar and so far the UK economy is doing well despite the doom and gloom forecast by the anti brexiteers.

The current rate of £/$ also makes exports more competitive for the British in the world market.

As to xenophobes well that just a big old tar brush isn't it and you wield it with gusto

« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2018, 04:01 »
0
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

Unfortunately Fotolia has a fixed exchange rate based on credits: 1 credit = €1 = $1 = £0.75; so we are still being paid in pounds with pre-brexit poll rates.

Regarding Brexit, my feelings are exactly as yours, and I am still hoping that it won't happen or will happen but in name only: all we need is a government crisis... then Libdem + Labour (despite Corbyn) + Ken Clarke and a few reasonable tories voting explicitly to retreat from article 50. Results of local elections are (mildly) promising.
An ill-advised advisory poll with a 52% majority was never the "will of the people", most other countries require a much larger majority for such important changes. And it's even less now that the will of the people has changed.



« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2018, 08:19 »
0
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

Unfortunately Fotolia has a fixed exchange rate based on credits: 1 credit = €1 = $1 = £0.75; so we are still being paid in pounds with pre-brexit poll rates.

Regarding Brexit, my feelings are exactly as yours, and I am still hoping that it won't happen or will happen but in name only: all we need is a government crisis... then Libdem + Labour (despite Corbyn) + Ken Clarke and a few reasonable tories voting explicitly to retreat from article 50. Results of local elections are (mildly) promising.
An ill-advised advisory poll with a 52% majority was never the "will of the people", most other countries require a much larger majority for such important changes. And it's even less now that the will of the people has changed.

So a democratic vote is only valid if it gives you the result you want?

Sounds just peachy in your world

And all the latest polls show that the British still want Brexit
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 08:51 by Sammy the Cat »

« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2018, 09:01 »
0
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

Unfortunately Fotolia has a fixed exchange rate based on credits: 1 credit = €1 = $1 = £0.75; so we are still being paid in pounds with pre-brexit poll rates.

Regarding Brexit, my feelings are exactly as yours, and I am still hoping that it won't happen or will happen but in name only: all we need is a government crisis... then Libdem + Labour (despite Corbyn) + Ken Clarke and a few reasonable tories voting explicitly to retreat from article 50. Results of local elections are (mildly) promising.
An ill-advised advisory poll with a 52% majority was never the "will of the people", most other countries require a much larger majority for such important changes. And it's even less now that the will of the people has changed.

So a democratic vote is only valid if it gives you the result you want?

Sounds just peachy in your world

And all the latest polls show that the British still want Brexit

I will respect the final, free, meaningful vote of the Parliament.
That will be a democratic vote, whatever the outcome.

An advisory (i.e. non-legally binding) referendum, which MPs (=no imperative mandate) have no obligation to follow - regardless of the (very poor, in this case) majority - is not a democratic vote.

Wasn't Brexit about restoring the "sovereignty of Parliament"? Or it's just when the Parliament votes as you want?

Even Mr Farage Said "A 52-48 Win For Remain Would Be 'Unfinished Business'". A 52-48 for Leave is no different.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 09:22 by klheyeyere »

« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2018, 10:15 »
0
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.


Unfortunately Fotolia has a fixed exchange rate based on credits: 1 credit = €1 = $1 = £0.75; so we are still being paid in pounds with pre-brexit poll rates.

Regarding Brexit, my feelings are exactly as yours, and I am still hoping that it won't happen or will happen but in name only: all we need is a government crisis... then Libdem + Labour (despite Corbyn) + Ken Clarke and a few reasonable tories voting explicitly to retreat from article 50. Results of local elections are (mildly) promising.
An ill-advised advisory poll with a 52% majority was never the "will of the people", most other countries require a much larger majority for such important changes. And it's even less now that the will of the people has changed.


So a democratic vote is only valid if it gives you the result you want?

Sounds just peachy in your world

And all the latest polls show that the British still want Brexit


I will respect the final, free, meaningful vote of the Parliament.
That will be a democratic vote, whatever the outcome.

An advisory (i.e. non-legally binding) referendum, which MPs (=no imperative mandate) have no obligation to follow - regardless of the (very poor, in this case) majority - is not a democratic vote.

Wasn't Brexit about restoring the "sovereignty of Parliament"? Or it's just when the Parliament votes as you want?

Even Mr Farage Said "A 52-48 Win For Remain Would Be 'Unfinished Business'". A 52-48 for Leave is no different.


Hate to tell you this but the UK parliament already voted in favour of activating article 50 by an overwhelming majority

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-38833883

It's happening whether you want it or not.

"Wasn't Brexit about restoring the "sovereignty of Parliament"? Or it's just when the Parliament votes as you want?" what are you talking about?

« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2018, 12:06 »
+2
So 1 credit is 75 pence?

I just convert 150 credits thinking it would be 150 euros roughly. It was 112 GBP, which paypal transferred to 124 EUROS.

If only my account was in euros. I live in Spain so am really dipping out after the conversion, plus paypal transfer

 :(

« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2018, 14:22 »
0
what are you talking about?

I am talking about the many attempts by Theresa May to prevent a meaningful final vote, because she is too stubborn to admit that the referendum was a bad idea (remember, she campaigned to remain!).
Let's wait and see whether everybody really thinks that "no deal is better than a bad deal" or there's a third way. For one, the Lords think so.

Quote from: suz7
So 1 credit is 75 pence?

Indeed. That is the problem.

PS: Sorry for going OT with the Brexit debate, although not completely OT: part of the reason 1 credit = 75p is so bad is Brexit. The rest is Fotolia profiting on that.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 14:34 by klheyeyere »


« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2018, 21:12 »
+3
Things are becoming so mixed up here.

The whole thing has nothing to do with the Brexit nor Theresa May.

The whole thing is only about the scam ran by Fotolia, who arbitrarily set up a convenient exchange rate, instead of letting the currency market deciding it.

This is so much valid for the pound as it is valid for the dollar.

Just a shameful currency manipulation.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 21:17 by Zero Talent »

« Reply #18 on: May 09, 2018, 00:28 »
+2
The Brexit xenophobes are seemingly determined to crazily crash the UK economy into the dirt, so I'd stick with sterling if I was you (the lower the value of the £ against the $ and the €, the more £'s you get).

Can you tell where my feelings on the subject lie?

I get paid in $ so I'm up a lot over the last year. Even so, I'd happily forego the money for a return to sanity here in the UK.

Or as an alternative view, the insistence on a crazy monetary union made of of utterly incompatible financial systems, riddled with corruption with huge economic problems is due to crash through the floor in the next few years as it needs to prop up more and more failed countries (and loses a big chunk of its free british money) so GBP is a good idea.

UK economy is doing well.  Pound is relatively stable against most currencies.


 

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