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Author Topic: Artist asking for the location of my work  (Read 1712 times)

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« on: June 02, 2018, 11:24 »
0
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« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 14:04 by Orchidpoet »


ShadySue

« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2018, 13:37 »
+1
I got a call from a local painter who asked me where I took some of my images. He got my contact info from a store where my works are sold.

I looked at his portfolio and found he had some paintings, with compositions very similar to my photos.

These locations have very unique features and are not accessible by car. I was there because I had local guides.

He insisted on asking the approximate location. I told him, but feel uncomfortable. If he painted his works, he would know where they were.

In the past, other painters also wanted to paint my photos, I said no.

Is this guy painting on the basis of my photos? How do you feel about that?

Sounds like he wanted to know where they were so he could fend off enquirers.
Next time, hang up just like any other unwanted caller. (Easy to say in retrospect  :'()

« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2018, 13:53 »
0
If you feel uncomfortable, just say it's a trade secret, and that's it.

« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2018, 13:59 »
0
I really don't know how to deal with this, honestly. He is actually an established artist associated with big-name art organizations.

I was polite. He said I could phone him if I have any art questions or he would call me in the future....

« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2018, 14:01 »
+1

Well, I tried to be diplomatic, I guess. ;)
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 14:04 by Orchidpoet »

ShadySue

« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2018, 14:49 »
0
I really don't know how to deal with this, honestly. He is actually an established artist associated with big-name art organizations.

I was polite. He said I could phone him if I have any art questions or he would call me in the future....
That could be seriously creepy, but maybe he's genuinely shy and fancies you. Who knows which, though?

« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2018, 18:03 »
0
That could be seriously creepy, but maybe he's genuinely shy and fancies you. Who knows which, though?

I think people are reading WAY TOO MUCH into this.

I expect he is a painter that wants to paint that scene.  He might prefer to do while at the site himself, in which case he wants to know where to go.  Or, he might just paint it from your photos, but wants to be able write a description stating where the image is from.

I see nothing creepy, or shy, and "fancies you" in a call like that.

Personally, it would probably depend on the day that he called me.  If I am in a generous mood, I would tell him, and likely follow on to an interest conversation of where we have both traveled. I would in turn ask him for some highly photogenic spots that he might know about, and that I could go to myself in the future.

If I were in a less generous mood, I would simply demure, and state that I do not feel comfortable sharing my "favorite photographic locations," knowing that would end the conversation, and that I would not get any reciprocal information either.

ShadySue

« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2018, 18:18 »
+2
I got a call from a local painter who asked me where I took some of my images. He got my contact info from a store where my works are sold.
Is there no data protection law where you are? Or have you given them permission to give out your personal info?
« Last Edit: June 02, 2018, 23:47 by ShadySue »

ShadySue

« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2018, 18:20 »
+4
That could be seriously creepy, but maybe he's genuinely shy and fancies you. Who knows which, though?
I expect he is a painter that wants to paint that scene.  He might prefer to do while at the site himself, in which case he wants to know where to go.  Or, he might just paint it from your photos, but wants to be able write a description stating where the image is from.
He has already painted the scene, whether from OP's images or not we can't be sure, but he didn't know where it was. Hmmm.

« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2018, 19:50 »
+2
That could be seriously creepy, but maybe he's genuinely shy and fancies you. Who knows which, though?
I expect he is a painter that wants to paint that scene.  He might prefer to do while at the site himself, in which case he wants to know where to go.  Or, he might just paint it from your photos, but wants to be able write a description stating where the image is from.
He has already painted the scene, whether from OP's images or not we can't be sure, but he didn't know where it was. Hmmm.

^^ This was exactly what I was thinking
Maybe he copied your ( or perhaps someones elses work, with a local guide to the spot)
And he wants to Cover his ass just on case

« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2018, 20:39 »
+8
LOL, had he fancied me, he should have phoned to buy my work.  ;D

I talked with a gallery owner about this, he also suggested it was likely that the painter copied or wants to copy my work, he would need the location to tell his gallery or buyer. During the conversation, I mentioned that he had already painted similar scenes. He replied, oh, a lot of places would look like this. If that was the case, why would he phone to find out where I photographed?

He phoned again. I did not answer this time.

« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2018, 07:37 »
0
On the subject of painting from people's photos I wouldn't like it much but I'm not really sure if you could easily prove a landscape was copied from your work unless your photo was something really famous or the painting was a close copy. I suspect he simply wants to know where it is as a buyer wants to know. Or maybe he was so impressed he wants to visit. Did you actually ask him why?

ShadySue

« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2018, 07:50 »
+5
He phoned again. I did not answer this time.
That's really creepy.

I would certainly have taken it up with the gallery that they passed on your info, unless you have given them permission to do that.
Normally here, someone can leave a query and/or contact details with a gallery, the gallery pass the info to you and it's up to you whether to respond or not.

« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2018, 13:04 »
0
On the subject of painting from people's photos I wouldn't like it much but I'm not really sure if you could easily prove a landscape was copied from your work unless your photo was something really famous or the painting was a close copy. I suspect he simply wants to know where it is as a buyer wants to know. Or maybe he was so impressed he wants to visit. Did you actually ask him why?

I agree. Painters can change the elements and compositions even if they use our photos as reference.

« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2018, 17:57 »
0
my advice is dont answer the phone again next time he calls and dont do nothing .He took one of your pics and he wants to paint it.what about credit?absolutely none.he will get all the credit fame and money well i doupt that he will be famous for one of your works or others and as for money how much he will make is questionable.
if he tracks you down or you answer the phone by accident.tell him sorry i am not interested to help you couse i dont think that its right there is a copyright issue after all.and walk away from this convo
painters are not the only people who spends hours the day to  finish their job.same applies for photographers and other people who are doin other jobs.if he wants to get ideas then he should try to get them in other ways.and if he wants to paint a landscape? then Drive your car and go to a landscape take a pic of it and draw it
Also just becouse he is a well known artist as you mentioned  doesnt mean he has any right to steal other peoples ideas or photos.

« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2018, 21:10 »
+2
He phoned again. I did not answer this time.

My gosh, he's persistent, I'll give him that! Hope he doesn't turn into a stalker.

« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2018, 01:33 »
+2
My gosh, he's persistent, I'll give him that! Hope he doesn't turn into a stalker.

This seems to be wildly paranoid group!?  Every small factoid is blown into a conspiracy of global proportions.  Sales go up? Must be a conspiracy!  Sales go down?  Same analysis.

If YOU call someone once to get information, and they do not give it to you -- do you just give up and never call again?  If so, you never took Salesman 101 class, and will never succeed in any business requiring contact with customers.

Yeah, the guy called again.  He is not necessarily a stalker!!  You refused to answer, so what do you expect next?  He doesn't know you are standing by the phone and refusing to answer. For all he knows you are not home, or maybe not even in country (personally I travel out of the country 4 to 5 months per year).

If you want to "get rid of him" then ANSWER THE D*** PHONE and tell him directly that you are not comfortable with giving that information, and would prefer he not call again.

Until you say that directly, he has zero idea what you are thinking, and -- if he is a decent businessman -- will keep calling.  That does not make him a stalker. It makes him a business person who has a chance to actually succeed in the world.  (Apparently a trait not shared by the OP...)


ShadySue

« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2018, 04:09 »
+2
Mindstorm, again you have not read the OP.
He got the information he wanted.
What possible 'good business' reason does he have for phoning back?

@OP, you need to shake off a lifetime of being 'nice' and 'polite', on the phone. Unsolicited phone calls were a huge issue here. Now they're illegal, thank goodness, which has reduced their incidence considerably; but dodgy businesses, like criminals, are always one step ahead. However, they're self-identifing  as being dodgy, so unless they're deliberately targeting the vulnerable, it's hard to see how it helps them. Definitely not 'good' business. I see that this case isn't quite the same as he was given the OP'S number by the gallery, we don't know whether that was legitimate.
Believe it or not, I used to reply to cold callers with a polite, "I'm sorry, I don't need X at the moment. Thank you." I soon got over that!
« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 17:16 by ShadySue »

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2018, 10:21 »
+2
I got a call from a local painter who asked me where I took some of my images. He got my contact info from a store where my works are sold.

I looked at his portfolio and found he had some paintings, with compositions very similar to my photos.

These locations have very unique features and are not accessible by car. I was there because I had local guides.

He insisted on asking the approximate location. I told him, but feel uncomfortable. If he painted his works, he would know where they were.

In the past, other painters also wanted to paint my photos, I said no.

Is this guy painting on the basis of my photos? How do you feel about that?

You should have insisted he not call you again and then hung up.

« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2018, 12:31 »
+2
You should have insisted he not call you again and then hung up.

If you are uncomfortable, that is the exact right response.

The "not answering the phone when he calls" is the exact WRONG response.  The caller does not know that you are there and refusing to answer, so he keeps calling. That just makes you more nervous and concerned.

Just communicate your desires and be done with it.  If he keeps calling after that, then just say "I DO NOT WANT TO TALK TO YOU ANY MORE. PLEASE STOP CALLING" and hang up.  Only an obtuse moron would continue after hearing that (OK,maybe after hearing it twice...)

« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2018, 13:07 »
+2
Hey, thanks all for the responses and suggestions.

All the points are well taken.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2018, 21:32 »
+2
You should have insisted he not call you again and then hung up.

If you are uncomfortable, that is the exact right response.

The "not answering the phone when he calls" is the exact WRONG response.  The caller does not know that you are there and refusing to answer, so he keeps calling. That just makes you more nervous and concerned.

Just communicate your desires and be done with it.  If he keeps calling after that, then just say "I DO NOT WANT TO TALK TO YOU ANY MORE. PLEASE STOP CALLING" and hang up.  Only an obtuse moron would continue after hearing that (OK,maybe after hearing it twice...)

My response was meant to be humorous but it depends on your stance. If youre one of the people who shares everything for the greater good of the community then youd happily give all of the detail. If youre more old school business then youd probably not share. Either way its personal choice. I selectively share based on the situation. For people who feel entitled and insist that I share I typically dont share. Artist painters seem to think its okay to take a photographers photo, paint an exact copy, and then sell it as art. I disagree. Go take your own amazing photos and then create a painting. Or spend hours researching your own locations like i do and then do your painting. Imagine contacting a painter and inisisting they tell you the location of their paintings so you can go take photos to sell.

« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2018, 15:47 »
+3
In the good old days (1990s) artists used to pay Art Rendering and Artists Reference fees.

Art Rendering was when the artists was essentially making a new version of the photograph in their own style. The fee should never have been less than $200 and was generally 75% to 100% of the amount that would be charged if the photograph had been used in media.

Art Reference was when one or a series of photos was used by the artist to develop a new work. The most common use of photos for this purpose was when the artist was creating a work of fine art. If the fine art work sold for several thousand dollars it was not uncommon for the photographer to get a fee equal to 50% of the value that the art would be sold for. The charge was usually a percentage based on the importance of your photo as a contribution to the overall work.

What I think you should have done is tell your caller that you normally charge an an "artist reference" fee. If he will explain exactly how he will use you photograph and if he plans to charge for the finished product you would be happy to quote him a price for using your image as reference. 

There is a chance that this artist was well known and that his finished paintings might sell for a lot of money.

P.S. It was great to live in a time when photographs were actually worth real money. For more information see "Negotiating Stock Photo Prices" Fifth Edition.

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2018, 21:35 »
0
There is still real money to be made from photos. You just need to know what buyers are willing to pay premium money for and not accept low amounts. I recently negotiated a print licensing deal for just under $10k for a large hotel chain. Its not as common as the good old days but the opportunity is still there.


 

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