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Author Topic: Black and white Images  (Read 1604 times)

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FiledIMAGE

  • Freelance Photgrapher based in Melbourne Australia

« on: August 08, 2017, 13:13 »
0
Out of interest do people upload black and white images to stock sites? I presume its not done. I often do black and white for portarits as attached. I guess one could always upload two copies.


« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 13:32 »
+2
Personally, I upload only one image in color. The buyer can simply convert to black and white if they so desire.  Some companies might consider it spamming if you upload both images...

« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 03:27 »
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Out of interest do people upload black and white images to stock sites? I presume its not done. I often do black and white for portarits as attached. I guess one could always upload two copies.
I did upload both versions of one of my more popular images when I started, not really knowing if I should but the sepia version sells about a quarter as much as the colour. i think I read that I shouldn't and so have not done it again.

« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 03:55 »
+1
Personally, I upload only one image in color. The buyer can simply convert to black and white if they so desire.  Some companies might consider it spamming if you upload both images...

My personal point of view is that the conversion in black and white from a color image is an artistic process and should be the personal choice of the author.
It can also define your personal style.
So I will not let to the customer to do that.
I have portraits in double versions, color and black and white; generally the b/w version sells more.

« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2017, 09:02 »
+1
My personal point of view is that the conversion in black and white from a color image is an artistic process and should be the personal choice of the author.

This is very true. It's not as simple as clicking the B&W button. It can be done in so many ways, emphasizing different parts of the image and the results can be two completely different images.

That said, I guess microstock might not be best the place for it.

FiledIMAGE

  • Freelance Photgrapher based in Melbourne Australia

« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2017, 11:19 »
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Thanks. Interesting views and it is as I thought. Mainly colour. I feel that sometimes Ill do both and keyword appropriately but generally colour only


« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 13:03 »
+2
Most designers prefer to add their own post processing effects to match their project exactly. Not all black and white conversions are created equally. Doing it yourself limits the options available to the customer and ultimately limits your customer base. In my opinion you are better off uploading the clean, color version of the file and letting the buyer adjust how they want.

Adobe Stock will accept some black and white content but it must have a serious "WOW!" effect to be considered.

-Mat

Hi Mat
I'm sure you're right generally speaking  but I have to say  that many of my bestsellers  are in black and white,  one of them is top on adobe/fotolia, hundreds of sells. I think that vintage style black and white is specifically linked to the content. I'm reasonably sure that same image in clean color would not sell the same

« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 23:20 »
+2
Most designers prefer to add their own post processing effects to match their project exactly. Not all black and white conversions are created equally. Doing it yourself limits the options available to the customer and ultimately limits your customer base. In my opinion you are better off uploading the clean, color version of the file and letting the buyer adjust how they want.

Adobe Stock will accept some black and white content but it must have a serious "WOW!" effect to be considered.

-Mat

Hi Mat
I'm sure you're right generally speaking  but I have to say  that many of my bestsellers  are in black and white,  one of them is top on adobe/fotolia, hundreds of sells. I think that vintage style black and white is specifically linked to the content. I'm reasonably sure that same image in clean color would not sell the same

I confirm to have the same kind of experience. But not a lot on Fotolia (probably because they have the idea that red tomatoes isolated on white sell better, and they accept them easier than a good b/w image)
Btw there is a big difference between a photo converted in "gray scale" by a "designer" and a black and white elaboration made by the photographer himself.
And, according to my personal experience, I must say that if b/w portraits sell well (generally better than the color ones), it is not really the case for other type of images (landscapes, still-life, life style).

« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2017, 23:23 »
+1
Most designers prefer to add their own post processing effects to match their project exactly. Not all black and white conversions are created equally. Doing it yourself limits the options available to the customer and ultimately limits your customer base. In my opinion you are better off uploading the clean, color version of the file and letting the buyer adjust how they want.

Adobe Stock will accept some black and white content but it must have a serious "WOW!" effect to be considered.

-Mat

When I see that Fotolia rejects a vertical image of a subject already submitted in horizontal format, as "similar image already submitted" I have serious doubts that the Fotolia really understand the designers needs, and/or the process of projecting a layout for a catalog or a magazine
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 23:26 by Chichikov »

« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2017, 00:37 »
+1
I have to say too that my  best seller(several times a day on several agencies since several years) is a black and white image.I have similars in color but they do not sell as well.
It's all about the subject and the idea behind it. B&W can help to highlight what is essential in a composition and limit disturbing elements.


« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2017, 10:06 »
0
Most designers prefer to add their own post processing effects to match their project exactly. Not all black and white conversions are created equally. Doing it yourself limits the options available to the customer and ultimately limits your customer base. In my opinion you are better off uploading the clean, color version of the file and letting the buyer adjust how they want.

Adobe Stock will accept some black and white content but it must have a serious "WOW!" effect to be considered.

-Mat



When I see that Fotolia rejects a vertical image of a subject already submitted in horizontal format, as "similar image already submitted" I have serious doubts that the Fotolia really understand the designers needs, and/or the process of projecting a layout for a catalog or a magazine

+1 

« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2017, 11:29 »
+2



I confirm to have the same kind of experience. But not a lot on Fotolia (probably because they have the idea that red tomatoes isolated on white sell better, and they accept them easier than a good b/w image)


I would like to state for the record that we will also accept photos of tomatoes that are not isolated on white. ;)

I would also like to mention that my comments above were simply my opinion. We will accept some black and white content but as a contributor you should ensure that black and white provides the best value for customers. Many contributors confuse what works well as fine art with what works well as stock. I'm not saying you are personally, but a more general statement. Do what works best for you of course.

-Mat




« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2017, 12:57 »
0



I confirm to have the same kind of experience. But not a lot on Fotolia (probably because they have the idea that red tomatoes isolated on white sell better, and they accept them easier than a good b/w image)


I would like to state for the record that we will also accept photos of tomatoes that are not isolated on white. ;)

I would also like to mention that my comments above were simply my opinion. We will accept some black and white content but as a contributor you should ensure that black and white provides the best value for customers. Many contributors confuse what works well as fine art with what works well as stock. I'm not saying you are personally, but a more general statement. Do what works best for you of course.

-Mat

lol, excellent!
+1

« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2017, 00:26 »
+1



I confirm to have the same kind of experience. But not a lot on Fotolia (probably because they have the idea that red tomatoes isolated on white sell better, and they accept them easier than a good b/w image)


I would like to state for the record that we will also accept photos of tomatoes that are not isolated on white. ;)

I would also like to mention that my comments above were simply my opinion. We will accept some black and white content but as a contributor you should ensure that black and white provides the best value for customers. Many contributors confuse what works well as fine art with what works well as stock. I'm not saying you are personally, but a more general statement. Do what works best for you of course.

-Mat

Touch !
;)

« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2017, 21:06 »
+1
Out of interest do people upload black and white images to stock sites? I presume its not done. I often do black and white for portarits as attached. I guess one could always upload two copies.

Rinder does a lot. I think it's to sho the texture of the wrinkles and grunge them up.  But mostly I would keep them original and let the clients do whatever they want.  There is a place for it though.

« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2017, 21:09 »
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I have a number of photos of fruit bats hanging from trees which have severe chromatic aberration. It's so prominent that you don't even need to zoom in to see the colour fringing. They weren't shot with a cheapie lens (though it was a zoom and the subjects were against a bright background.) I couldn't get rid of the colour fringing in Lightroom, only reduce it a little. With the amount of CA that these images have, I doubt many stock agencies would accept them. Though I was thinking of converting them to B & W and trying my luck.


« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2017, 08:30 »
0
I have a number of photos of fruit bats hanging from trees which have severe chromatic aberration. It's so prominent that you don't even need to zoom in to see the colour fringing. They weren't shot with a cheapie lens (though it was a zoom and the subjects were against a bright background.) I couldn't get rid of the colour fringing in Lightroom, only reduce it a little. With the amount of CA that these images have, I doubt many stock agencies would accept them. Though I was thinking of converting them to B & W and trying my luck.

Good thought for shots or subjects that would lend themselves to this kind of grayscale version. I know the old line, rejected, now it's one of my best sellers, but I had one that was color and rejected. A year later I thought of converting and working with it, made into B&W and it is one of my top ten photos. I can see 99 other images of mine that as B&W would probably do nothing.

I think Mat's suggestion is a good one. Let the buyers decide. But I'd also say if a photo has CA or other color flaws, like you point out, but is sharp and good contrast, it can work as B&W. There's never one answer to any of this. In fact bright colorful images sell best! It's more about each image, instead of, make things B&W and more get sales. There's nothing more magic in Micro than thinking and giving each subject or photo the treatment that suits it best.


 

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