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Author Topic: Do i need permission to sell photos of national parks like Grand Canyon?  (Read 1279 times)

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« on: July 11, 2017, 03:58 »
0
Hello, i want to shoot some photos and videos in Grand Canyon and can't understand do i need permission to do this?
They not included in restriction lists of stock sites.
On official site tells if shoot is commercial i need permission, but also told 1-2 people 0$. I'am confused, does anybody shoot in Grand Canyon, did you apply for permission?
I have emailed them but no answer.


« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2017, 04:49 »
0
Selling photos is a commercial activity.

I believe it is common at this stage to say something like "you do the math"

 ::)

« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2017, 05:01 »
0
i know that but they say. if 1-2 people and camera 0$)
Mayube someone have such experience since there are many photos from Grand Canyon.
so i am confused, since they don't answer.
And since i can't give them info that they need to make official permin bacuse i am not from USA, don't have a crew and insurance for filming in USA company)
I will visit like tourist but, why not to sell photos if they will be good.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2017, 05:17 »
+4
I'm pretty sure what they mean is you need permission to hold big photo shoots with models, assistants and lots of equipment, where you would be in the way the public, preventing them from enjoying the scenery.

IANAL, but I've got pics of the Grand Canyon and other US parks on iS, and they're extremely paranoid about not accepting pics if there might be an issue. Still, their rules might change ...

« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2017, 05:31 »
0
I'm pretty sure what they mean is you need permission to hold big photo shoots with models, assistants and lots of equipment, where you would be in the way the public, preventing them from enjoying the scenery.

IANAL, but I've got pics of the Grand Canyon and other US parks on iS, and they're extremely paranoid about not accepting pics if there might be an issue. Still, their rules might change ...
Thanks for reply)
Your pics are old or new to understand if they still accepting these, but i don't upload to IS?
Does these pics sells?

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2017, 06:08 »
0
I'm pretty sure what they mean is you need permission to hold big photo shoots with models, assistants and lots of equipment, where you would be in the way the public, preventing them from enjoying the scenery.

IANAL, but I've got pics of the Grand Canyon and other US parks on iS, and they're extremely paranoid about not accepting pics if there might be an issue. Still, their rules might change ...
Thanks for reply)
Your pics are old or new to understand if they still accepting these, but i don't upload to IS?
Does these pics sells?

The pics (scanned slides!) were uploaded years ago, but that commerical use thing still applied to US parks then.
They sold back in the day, but there are loads better.
You need to look to see what your competition is, then decide whether yours can compete.

Added: I looked through iS's Intellectual Property wiki pages. I couldn't see anything about the Grand Canyon, but there is info about Canyonlands and Arches:
"The Canyonlands and Arches are two national parks located in the state of Utah, USA.

There are rules related to behavior and comportment within the parks (i.e. designated climbing areas, no climbing on natural bridges/arches), all of which can be reviewed online by visiting the official parks website.

The above rules should be considered in creating media both within and of the national park lands, e.g. no media containing capture of violation of stated rules within the park."


I know nothing about other agencies. SS is pretty lax, sometimes on the illegal side, so I wouldn't necessarily go by what's accepted there.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 06:27 by ShadySue »

« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2017, 06:30 »
0
Since i am not from US and never been before in national parks in US, it will be first experience. I saw many good photos from Grand Canyon, hope i can shoot something good too.
Basically i want with those pics to compensate cost of trip.

« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2017, 06:39 »
+4
Since i am not from US and never been before in national parks in US, it will be first experience. I saw many good photos from Grand Canyon, hope i can shoot something good too.
Basically i want with those pics to compensate cost of trip.
With the so many good images of Grand Canyon that you can find I seriously doubt that the photos you will shoot there will allow you to compensate the cost of the trip.
Maybe it will compensate to cost of a pair of drinks :)

I wish you are Ansel Adams 2.0

Happy trip and good luck!

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2017, 06:54 »
+1
Since i am not from US and never been before in national parks in US, it will be first experience. I saw many good photos from Grand Canyon, hope i can shoot something good too.
Basically i want with those pics to compensate cost of trip.
Well, I guess it depends whether you're just walking in from a nearby town or flying in from halfway across the world.
I'm afraid I'm with Chichikov on this; you're just too late to the party. In the past, I have made back the value of trips, even from Scotland to Newfoundland, but these photos were taken in 2010 and sold in the heyday and were absolute luck (I was on a whalewatching trip, but we happened to pass a very pretty iceberg, a week apart (so it looked very different as it had melted betweentimes), which clearly no-one else could ever take, and these, not the whales, paid for the trip. I've paid for a couple of shorter city breaks too, but again in 2012.
Things are so different now.
Just think of all the competition. The best you can hope for is to share some of their sales.
Good luck, anyway.

« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2017, 07:05 »
0
Shoot video / time-lapse if you expect to pay for the trip. With just images it will be challenging (not impossible of course). The world is not just Shutterstock...

I have paid for trips to some of the most visited locations in the world with millions and millions of pictures taken each year. But that's with footage.

The most visited locations are usually also the most requested locations from buyers.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 07:32 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2017, 09:20 »
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Thanks all for wishing good luck, yea i also will shoot footage, and hope not only Grand Canyon.

« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2017, 10:15 »
0
Thanks all for wishing good luck, yea i also will shoot footage, and hope not only Grand Canyon.

I shoot there all the time. Its no issue unless you are doing a commercial shoot, then its permit, insurance, and all the hassle of doing that kind of thing. Agree with increasing that shooting time lapse and video will get you a better return than stills. My stills do sell but not enough to pay for more than a micro fiber cloth.

« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2017, 12:36 »
+1

I shoot there all the time. Its no issue unless you are doing a commercial shoot, then its permit, insurance, and all the hassle of doing that kind of thing. Agree with increasing that shooting time lapse and video will get you a better return than stills. My stills do sell but not enough to pay for more than a micro fiber cloth.

If you are shooting for stock, then it is a commercial shoot. But I'm pretty sure the park rules are meant more for larger production shoots where there's going to be a crew or equipment that could inconvenience other park visitors.

If it's just one person shooting, I would not worry about it.

« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2017, 13:19 »
0
There are specific rules that outline when you have have a release available from the DOI.  Basic rule of thumb, shoot hand-held with no model and make no impact to park or grounds- & you should be ok. That said, you should review the rules for yourself and contact the park service if in doubt.

« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2017, 13:33 »
0
I tried 3 times, maybe they will respond in future.
All like said in rules 1-2 people with tripod. there will be more of us but like regular group of tourist.
And i really don't understand why no model, every people in photo model?

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2017, 13:55 »
0
I tried 3 times, maybe they will respond in future.
All like said in rules 1-2 people with tripod. there will be more of us but like regular group of tourist.
And i really don't understand why no model, every people in photo model?
If you're going with a group of models, you'd be better to get all the appropriate permissions. You didn't mention that in your OP.

cascoly

  • Photography, travel & online games at cascoly.com

« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2017, 14:40 »
0
we were in Utah when the govt shut down for a few days in Oct 2013 - when we drove along the major highway that runs thru Zion, there were signs that said since the govt was shut NO ONE was allowed to take pictures at any of the pullouts, etc!!


« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2017, 15:38 »
0
I will be in group, but not models.
like regular tourist trip with sight seeing, but want to make some photos and footage, and photos with people will be only for personal use, to show their family or so.
And I want to shoot some landscapes for stock.

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2017, 15:54 »
0
I will be in group, but not models.
like regular tourist trip with sight seeing, but want to make some photos and footage, and photos with people will be only for personal use, to show their family or so.
And I want to shoot some landscapes for stock.
That'll be OK, as presumably you won't be spending lots of time putting them into the perfect position, waiting for the perfect light, making sure their makeup and hair is perfect, assistants with reflectors etc.

« Reply #19 on: July 11, 2017, 16:04 »
0
No, just shot for home album or social medias.
I discover all parks have different policy about filming.
yellowstone ask for permit for stock footage.
And one funny moment i can't pay for permit if it needed because i am not in US, and the need money or check =\
Or even all card info, which banks prohibit to tell.
Checked golden gate policy O_O
10000$ for a day for all video shooting, even youtube, they are insane
« Last Edit: July 12, 2017, 03:57 by GooDween »

« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2017, 03:17 »
0
EDIT:

I don't think many of the 92,392 images or 13,604 video clips of the Golden Gate Bridge on Shutterstock were taken with a $10,000 permit...



I don't think many of the 38,633 images or 7,883 video clips from Yellowstone on Shutterstock were taken with a $10,000 permit...
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 03:44 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2017, 03:28 »
0
its for Golden Gate bridge. i think the same, this policy is so cumblesome,  its ok for large production but for stock and youtube its overkill.

« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2017, 03:41 »
0
its for Golden Gate bridge. i think the same, this policy is so cumblesome,  its ok for large production but for stock and youtube its overkill.

Oops, missed that.  :)

But you are thinking WAY too much about this. Will you go with a team of 10 people with actors, cranes, dolly tracks, parked vehicles? No. Didn't think so.

You take photos/film as a tourist. You don't have to worry about permits. It does not cost $10,000 to set up a single tripod and make a time-lapse of the Golden Gate Bridge.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 03:44 by increasingdifficulty »


 

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