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Author Topic: Getty Images  (Read 8894 times)

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« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2009, 14:54 »
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Just an update for those of you who have considered posting your work on Flickr to have it "found" by Getty......the current Getty Flickr collection photographers have been invited to submit an unlimited number of their hand picked photos for review by their editors for inclusion in the collection.  I almost fell out of my chair when I read the note.....

I know that Flickr gets hammered here a lot, but for me posting on Flickr led me directly to Getty and quite a few nice sales at price points considerably higher than microstock.



lisafx

« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2009, 15:27 »
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Congrats Jeff.  Nothing wrong with that.  :)




Sergey

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« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2009, 08:49 »
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Congrats Jeff.  Nothing wrong with that.  :)






it's a trap.

they're scouting Flickr to steal the few good apples and reselling them at premium price
without the hassle of accepting amateurs as full associates.

if you're really worth Getty then just apply for Getty Images from their site
and see what they tell you  (usually to *) but never say never ....


« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2009, 13:33 »
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here is one piece of getty anecdotal experience...

i've been doing micro for a couple years now and made the getty application, along with an edited selection of unlicensed 'non-micro' stuff on a web album.  they replied to me a month later with 'no-thanks' and further that applicants can never re-apply.  such is life.  on the other hand, a friend who is on getty for a few years, has reported that business is really slumped in the macro world and that they are taking very few new contributors.  :(

Sergey

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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2009, 13:43 »
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here is one piece of getty anecdotal experience...

i've been doing micro for a couple years now and made the getty application, along with an edited selection of unlicensed 'non-micro' stuff on a web album.  they replied to me a month later with 'no-thanks' and further that applicants can never re-apply.  such is life.  on the other hand, a friend who is on getty for a few years, has reported that business is really slumped in the macro world and that they are taking very few new contributors.  :(

it's not a mistery that Getty is no more paying 1000s of $ for a single image as years ago,
but that's not because of Getty is because buyers are cutting costs and/or going bankrupt.

Getty is therefore more and more picky about new  applicants, not a mistery either,
but once again if you're really good you should try your luck with Getty before or later.

they're more catered towards news and sports anyway, not my field actually,
for travel stuff i feel good with the other RMs.

i guess your friend sent some pics looking too much "microstock" that means
too sharp and too glossy, the typical stuff that sells fine on micros but bad on macros.




« Reply #30 on: August 16, 2009, 15:27 »
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Congrats Jeff.  Nothing wrong with that.  :)





if you're really worth Getty then just apply for Getty Images from their site
and see what they tell you  (usually to *) but never say never ....


and you wonder why people sell micro???

Sergey

    This user is banned.
« Reply #31 on: August 16, 2009, 16:43 »
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Congrats Jeff.  Nothing wrong with that.  :)





if you're really worth Getty then just apply for Getty Images from their site
and see what they tell you  (usually to *) but never say never ....


and you wonder why people sell micro???

if Getty booted him out he can still apply for Alamy, Age, Masterfile, Corbis, etc

and anyway, being with Getty is not a gold medal on your chest, if you really
want to show off then only your portfolio is what really matters, nobody cares
if you're with Getty or Corbis or micros.

people joined Getty because of the old legend that Getty has the highest payout
in the industry but is not true anymore, not at all.

« Reply #32 on: August 16, 2009, 19:02 »
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Hi Sergey,

 I would love it if the playing field was more balanced but I can tell you from my experience that Getty are still the largest return per image in the stock industry. I agree you should spread your work to many of these different agencies so you are diversified and Getty is not your only option but they do make by far the largest RPI in the business at this point RM, RF or Micro. I can't say what tomorrow will bring.

Best,
Jonathan

Sergey

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« Reply #33 on: August 17, 2009, 04:39 »
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Hi Sergey,

 I would love it if the playing field was more balanced but I can tell you from my experience that Getty are still the largest return per image in the stock industry. I agree you should spread your work to many of these different agencies so you are diversified and Getty is not your only option but they do make by far the largest RPI in the business at this point RM, RF or Micro. I can't say what tomorrow will bring.

Best,
Jonathan

maybe because they strictly edit their collection and only accept the very best,
you could do the same deleting your lowest sellers and see an increase in RPI i guess.

grp_photo

« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2009, 11:06 »
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From my little experience Corbis does edit harder (at least through their Zefa-Collection where I'm a member about 6 years). Getty did accept some pictures from sessions which were completely rejected by Corbis. I only become recently a contributor to Getty through their creative channel (pictures are accepted in the Taxi- and Riser- Collection so far). So far it looks to me that Getty does actually sell better than Corbis.

« Reply #35 on: August 17, 2009, 11:20 »
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 Hi Sergey,

 Thanks for the feedback. I feel Getty's ruling power has a great deal to do with how they built out their business from the start not necessarily that they have better images but a stronger following based on their efforts over years of creating strong relationships with their buyers. Many buyers go there because that is where they like to shop from years of shopping and strong direct relations. That can always change over the years but it takes someone as big and smart to do so. We have seen a drop in their control of the market over the past 10 years but it has been a slow process and due to many factors.
 On a personal contributor level I think it is better to have strong images rather than a lot of them so editing is a very good idea. Over time these companies watch to see who is making them money and who is costing them money. Keeping your RPI and "sell through rate" up by keeping your edits tight is one way to accomplish this. Quality does make a big difference in sales in all the stock business models for the most part.

Best,
Jonathan

Best,
Jonathan

Sergey

    This user is banned.
« Reply #36 on: August 17, 2009, 11:54 »
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well in some fields there's not much you can do :

some topics sell 10 times more than others, it's not your or their fault, it's just the way the market is.

i'll never become rich shooting social documentaries or slums in Mumbai ... even the most famous photographers working for Magnum or VII are starving to death compared to years ago, two famous ones for instance had to beg Getty for a grant of 50K$ in order to go back to war zones and shoot new projects as magazines are in such big crisis that they're paying next to zero to war photographers and go figure what they offer for social stories of poorness and disgrace.

on the other side, the last idiot with a Canon Rebel bought 6 months ago can shoot Paris Hilton drunk on a party and sell the picture for TENS of 1000 $$$.

see what's the future of news ... sad world...

« Reply #37 on: August 17, 2009, 12:52 »
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They are not begging, it is a normal way to get money for a project. And these grants are very good and these photographers are making good money. You are just not informed.

Sergey

    This user is banned.
« Reply #38 on: August 17, 2009, 17:00 »
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They are not begging, it is a normal way to get money for a project. And these grants are very good and these photographers are making good money. You are just not informed.

maybe you're right, but...

Anthony Suau who won the last World Press Award said he had no jobs for 3 straight months
and he's no idea how to pay the bills and his mortgage.

if he's in deep sh-it, what about the least famous photojournalists ?

« Reply #39 on: August 18, 2009, 00:54 »
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Hi GC,

 I can help a bit on the Getty Corbis questions. I would only show the very best of your work. These days Macro is about stelar imagery not numbers. Keep it to 10-20 images. Take a few dollars to build a web site there are cheap templates these days. The trick is to get through the first door as there will be a few to pass through to getting accepted. You might find it is the best thing in the world on the other hand you may feel that Micro is a good fit. Either way you will not know without trying. If rejected do not go away discouraged learn from the first try and then rework your material and try again. The large agencies have always gone through shifts in when they are accepting photographers and what their collections are in need of. Timing is a good part of it.
 The other option is to do some research on the two big sites and see some of their third party collections they represent. If you go to the partners section at Getty and Corbis it will link you to a list of all the separate agencies you can contact to shoot for and work your way up to getting recognition in the Macro business helping to make the transition to a direct contract down the road. This doesn't happen over night and will take a great deal of dedication. The more diversification through out the industry the stronger your business model will be in the long haul.

Good Luck,
Jonathan

this sounds like excellent advice!

« Reply #40 on: August 18, 2009, 10:51 »
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Hi Leaf,

 Thanks for the props. The speed that info travels these days something I wrote from 2 months ago seems like a blast from the past ;D Hold on to your hats everyone this roller coaster hasn't hit the loop de loops yet :)

Best,
Jonathan

« Reply #41 on: August 18, 2009, 15:42 »
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They are not begging, it is a normal way to get money for a project. And these grants are very good and these photographers are making good money. You are just not informed.

maybe you're right, but...

Anthony Suau who won the last World Press Award said he had no jobs for 3 straight months
and he's no idea how to pay the bills and his mortgage.

if he's in deep sh-it, what about the least famous photojournalists ?

Yes, that is too bad. But it depends on many things. You must have a good rep if you are good photographer and not a a good businessman. Winning World Press Award will not get you new jobs just like that. I know Reuters stuff photographer with great salary. And this salary is the same like five years ago. His agency is taking care of the business side.


 

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