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Author Topic: Great names of the past!  (Read 7341 times)

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lagereek

« on: November 16, 2010, 10:18 »
0
Some guys whos talent will forever remain ( and copied) for sure, Ernst Haas, Pete-Turner, Jay-Maisel. Mitchell Funk, Bill Rivelli, John Claridge, these guys were all my raw-models, and inspired me.
Ofcourse then you got the untouchables like: Avedon, Penn, Newton, Bailey and Webber.

how is that?


« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2010, 11:01 »
0
Thanks. I hope this thread evolves !

I always very much liked the work of Ernst Haas. I was interested to see that his archive is now posthumously represented by Getty Images rather than by Magnum Photos.

lagereek

« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2010, 12:51 »
0
Thanks. I hope this thread evolves !

I always very much liked the work of Ernst Haas. I was interested to see that his archive is now posthumously represented by Getty Images rather than by Magnum Photos.


Yes, Haas is pretty much the grandfather of color photography and the man who set Kodachrome-25  on the map.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2010, 13:01 »
0
The Muench brothers are still active ... even adding family members ... and were instrumental (imo) in making Arizona Highways such a popular magazine.  I've always loved that magazine and others that copied it ... and still find Joseph and David Muench photography a great inspiration.

And, who could leave out Ansel Adams.  He inspired me to adapt the Zone System to 35mm/digital.   Dating myself?   :P 8)

« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2010, 13:18 »
0
How about Hag

http://www.hagsphotography.com/WebImages/index.htm

Folks can do magical stuff with PS but this was all done with enlargers and chemicals...

« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2010, 13:42 »
0
I think I previously posted this link for you in a thread on the iStockphoto forum Lagereek: Sarah Moon's lovely film about Henri Cartier-Bresson - in 4 parts and entitled Point D'Interrogation. Available to buy here as part of a boxed set.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsw2o9DTbhQ[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_XzS6U5dQc[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YayqR43Ui3I[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brIlu2S1NzI[/youtube]

OM

« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2010, 14:13 »
0
Horst P Horst


« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 17:53 by OM »

lagereek

« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2010, 14:36 »
0
I think I previously posted this link for you in a thread on the iStockphoto forum Lagereek: Sarah Moon's lovely film about Henri Cartier-Bresson - in 4 parts and entitled Point D'Interrogation. Available to buy here as part of a boxed set.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsw2o9DTbhQ[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_XzS6U5dQc[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YayqR43Ui3I[/youtube]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brIlu2S1NzI[/youtube]



Cheers!

I know, fantastic isnt it?  all these names we have mentioned had one thing in common, inventors with panache.

« Reply #8 on: November 16, 2010, 15:22 »
0
Robert Capa.

« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2010, 16:31 »
0
  I'm going to mention some still life photographers you may not know about, but they created the look that is timeless:
Irving Penn, Phil Marco, Henry Sandbank, Hiro, Michael O'Neill.
  And some photographers from what used to be called illustration photography:
Tony Petrucelli, Peter Papadopolous, Anthony Edgeworth, Hal Davis.
These guys were all advertising photographers when everything had to be perfect in the camera- almost no retouching was done if it could be avoided, because retouching involved drawing on the chrome with dyes, or making a dye transfer print to be airbrushed. Some of them went on to direct TV commercials, some just faded away.

lagereek

« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2010, 16:51 »
0
  I'm going to mention some still life photographers you may not know about, but they created the look that is timeless:
Irving Penn, Phil Marco, Henry Sandbank, Hiro, Michael O'Neill.
  And some photographers from what used to be called illustration photography:
Tony Petrucelli, Peter Papadopolous, Anthony Edgeworth, Hal Davis.
These guys were all advertising photographers when everything had to be perfect in the camera- almost no retouching was done if it could be avoided, because retouching involved drawing on the chrome with dyes, or making a dye transfer print to be airbrushed. Some of them went on to direct TV commercials, some just faded away.

Penn, Hiro and Edgeworth!!  talk about perfection. These guys shoots were so incredibly expensive the Art-Directors had to mortgage their houses.

RT


« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2010, 17:10 »
0
all these names we have mentioned had one thing in common, inventors with panache.

I'd also add that they were judged for the quality of the photo content first and foremost, something that's seemingly less important these days.

« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2010, 17:31 »
0
I just handed in my photographer's report for class on Henri Cartier-Bresson. I really enjoyed doing the research, seeing his photos and learning about his life. One of the founding members of Magnum Photos. Every time I look at one of his photos I find something new that I hadn't noticed before.

« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2010, 17:41 »
0
  I'm going to mention some still life photographers you may not know about, but they created the look that is timeless:
Irving Penn, Phil Marco, Henry Sandbank, Hiro, Michael O'Neill.
  And some photographers from what used to be called illustration photography:
Tony Petrucelli, Peter Papadopolous, Anthony Edgeworth, Hal Davis.
These guys were all advertising photographers when everything had to be perfect in the camera- almost no retouching was done if it could be avoided, because retouching involved drawing on the chrome with dyes, or making a dye transfer print to be airbrushed. Some of them went on to direct TV commercials, some just faded away.

Penn, Hiro and Edgeworth!!  talk about perfection. These guys shoots were so incredibly expensive the Art-Directors had to mortgage their houses.

    The art directors didn't pay for the shoots- the client did. And i think you will find that the average advertising photo budget now is far higher, including the fee, than what these guys charged. Which is one of the reasons stock became so big. Speaking of which, don't forget Jay Maisel, Pete Turner and Larry Freid started the first stock agency that made it respectable to use stock- The Image Bank.

« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2010, 17:42 »
0
A few more that I like, Bill Brandt, Man Ray, Terence Donovan and another Magnum photographer that's still going, Martin Parr.

WarrenPrice

« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2010, 18:08 »
0
Being from a sports and action background ... I have to mention Walter Iooss, Jr.

Sports Illustrated.

« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2010, 18:53 »
0
Being from a sports and action background ... I have to mention Walter Iooss, Jr.

Sports Illustrated.

  Don't forget Neil Leifer and John Zimmerman, both from SI. And the king of boxing photographers- Herb Scharfman.


« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2010, 19:10 »
0
Some of his photos are so famous that we sometimes forget the photographer...

Yousuf Karsh

Have a look:
http://www.karsh.org/#/the_work/portraits/

Claude

« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2010, 19:39 »
0
and another Magnum photographer that's still going, Martin Parr.


Martin Parr is also a great champion of photography. For example I saw him deliver a very interesting FNAC lecture about Tony Ray Jones

Tony Ray Jones photos at BBC website
« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 19:41 by bunhill »

lagereek

« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2010, 01:51 »
0
 I'm going to mention some still life photographers you may not know about, but they created the look that is timeless:
Irving Penn, Phil Marco, Henry Sandbank, Hiro, Michael O'Neill.
  And some photographers from what used to be called illustration photography:
Tony Petrucelli, Peter Papadopolous, Anthony Edgeworth, Hal Davis.
These guys were all advertising photographers when everything had to be perfect in the camera- almost no retouching was done if it could be avoided, because retouching involved drawing on the chrome with dyes, or making a dye transfer print to be airbrushed. Some of them went on to direct TV commercials, some just faded away.

Penn, Hiro and Edgeworth!!  talk about perfection. These guys shoots were so incredibly expensive the Art-Directors had to mortgage their houses.

    The art directors didn't pay for the shoots- the client did. And i think you will find that the average advertising photo budget now is far higher, including the fee, than what these guys charged. Which is one of the reasons stock became so big. Speaking of which, don't forget Jay Maisel, Pete Turner and Larry Freid started the first stock agency that made it respectable to use stock- The Image Bank.

Hi, well being an old member myself of The-Image-Bank, I kind of know this,  thats how I started this thread. Without going into names, back in 91, there were a whole string of Fashion/advertising photographers who worked on dayrates of 30K,  today, there are only two who can comand this price and they are both in Fashion.

The average car/AD  shoot back in the mid-90s  carried a budget of 50K,  today 90% is done is PS.  I myself have got Landrover as a client, we used to travel to the Scotish Highlands, Norway, New-Zealand and with brand new cars.
Today,  they buy an RM  stockshot of the location,  studio shot of the car and then let a designer paste-in the car in the scenery,  Dirt-cheap instead of sending a crew to some exotic location.
The Art-buyer at O&M in London, one of the worlds biggest AD-agencies used to have a budget of well over a 7-figue amount to spend on shots,  today, thats cut in less then half.
No,  todays creative world is but a fraction of yesterdays.

best
« Last Edit: November 17, 2010, 02:18 by lagereek »

« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2010, 02:56 »
0
Two masters of lighting George Hurrell and Francesco Scavullo.

« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2010, 05:09 »
0
Being from a sports and action background ... I have to mention Walter Iooss, Jr.

Sports Illustrated.


  Don't forget Neil Leifer and John Zimmerman, both from SI. And the king of boxing photographers- Herb Scharfman.

Eamonn McCabe

http://www.eamonnmccabe.co.uk/showcase/sport.html

« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2010, 09:07 »
0
 I'm going to mention some still life photographers you may not know about, but they created the look that is timeless:
Irving Penn, Phil Marco, Henry Sandbank, Hiro, Michael O'Neill.
  And some photographers from what used to be called illustration photography:
Tony Petrucelli, Peter Papadopolous, Anthony Edgeworth, Hal Davis.
These guys were all advertising photographers when everything had to be perfect in the camera- almost no retouching was done if it could be avoided, because retouching involved drawing on the chrome with dyes, or making a dye transfer print to be airbrushed. Some of them went on to direct TV commercials, some just faded away.

Penn, Hiro and Edgeworth!!  talk about perfection. These guys shoots were so incredibly expensive the Art-Directors had to mortgage their houses.

    The art directors didn't pay for the shoots- the client did. And i think you will find that the average advertising photo budget now is far higher, including the fee, than what these guys charged. Which is one of the reasons stock became so big. Speaking of which, don't forget Jay Maisel, Pete Turner and Larry Freid started the first stock agency that made it respectable to use stock- The Image Bank.

Hi, well being an old member myself of The-Image-Bank, I kind of know this,  thats how I started this thread. Without going into names, back in 91, there were a whole string of Fashion/advertising photographers who worked on dayrates of 30K,  today, there are only two who can comand this price and they are both in Fashion.

The average car/AD  shoot back in the mid-90s  carried a budget of 50K,  today 90% is done is PS.  I myself have got Landrover as a client, we used to travel to the Scotish Highlands, Norway, New-Zealand and with brand new cars.
Today,  they buy an RM  stockshot of the location,  studio shot of the car and then let a designer paste-in the car in the scenery,  Dirt-cheap instead of sending a crew to some exotic location.
The Art-buyer at O&M in London, one of the worlds biggest AD-agencies used to have a budget of well over a 7-figue amount to spend on shots,  today, thats cut in less then half.
No,  todays creative world is but a fraction of yesterdays.

best

    I could give examples in the other direction, and I think car shoots say more about the car industry than anything else. Given that this is about great shooters of the past, a car guy that comes to mind is Dave Langley, who shot a lot of the great Volkswagen ads for the beetle. My favorite was a shot of an old couple standing in front of a backwoods shack with a volkswagen beetle sitting in front of the shack, and the headline" It was the only thing to do after the mule died" . Another VW ad (not sure if Dave did it)  was a shot of a snow filled scene with two tire tracks leading to a large shed, with a VW parked at the end of the tracks. The headline was " How does the guy who drives the snowplow get to the snowplow?" Great ads don't need exotic locations, just a good idea, which is the real problem with todays advertising.

« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2010, 10:20 »
0
The headline was " How does the guy who drives the snowplow get to the snowplow?"


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABcckOTVqao[/youtube]

« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2010, 13:56 »
0
Louis Daguerre,

First known photo of a human. Boulevard du Temple in Paris 1838. It was obviously a long exposure. Only 1 person ("ghost") from the past showed up...



 

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