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Author Topic: Does anyone add grain in camera raw to stock nature images?  (Read 1296 times)

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Tyson Anderson

  • www.openrangestudios.com
« on: January 10, 2017, 01:31 »
0
I like the way little grain looks on my nature images but haven't added it to any Ive submitted assuming they'll be rejected.  Just curious if others bump up the grain a little bit.


« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2017, 05:08 »
0
I do occasionally add grain but not in camera raw.  I find it sometimes makes a photo look sharper and more detailed.  I lower the effect on the sky and the darkest areas, so it isn't noticeable.

« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2017, 05:27 »
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I did this several times, but always with a notice, because for a buyer it is not visible on preview. Just to not do surprises for him.

« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2017, 05:29 »
0
I like the look of some VSCOs and many have grain already (sometimes even too much). I add on the RAW file.

« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2017, 05:51 »
+11
You're providing raw material for designers, not art for yourself. They can always add a grain filter if they like, but they can't take one off if you've put it on. In addition, if they want a grain effect, what size are they want to print the image at?  The size of the grain desired will depend on the final reproduction size. So all you do by adding filters to your photos is to limit the sales potential.

« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2017, 10:02 »
+4
Not all buyers of images are necessarily "designers". They may not plan on ever editing the image, or they may not have the time or interest in doing so. Creatively editing images subtly or even quite dramatically in a desirable way can sometimes be a fine a idea, particularly in a crowded subject. It does have to be done well, look "right", and intuitively suit potential needs. But there's no reason not to provide options.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2017, 10:07 by Daryl Ray »

« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2017, 13:13 »
0
True, but you need to realise the difference between colour filters on a sunset and an invisible grain filter on a nature shot. Super-filtered landscapes can sell well.

Tyson Anderson

  • www.openrangestudios.com
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2017, 15:46 »
0
Thanks for all feedback.  I personally like to edit all images as good as possible so the buyer doesn't need to do any editing.  As far as grain, I will most likely do some experimenting but only add just a little.  I do agree with not adding too much as it cannot be reversed, even if I like the gritty effect it might add to a photo.  Thanks again!

« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2017, 16:52 »
0
it will get dinged for noise, baldrick is right, you are reducing commercial value

« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2017, 16:53 »
0
You're providing raw material for designers, not art for yourself. They can always add a grain filter if they like, but they can't take one off if you've put it on. In addition, if they want a grain effect, what size are they want to print the image at?  The size of the grain desired will depend on the final reproduction size. So all you do by adding filters to your photos is to limit the sales potential.

When I make an image I like to put a little of myself in it, like a lot of us I think.
If nobody will do that all the images will be the same aseptic boring flat (and maybe it is one of the reason why there is so much &*^% on microstock sites)

If a designer can add grain or not, change color or not, etc., according to his needs, to get the image like he wants, why does he not do the picture himself, exactly as he wants we are never better served than by ourselves ;)

« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2017, 18:03 »
+2
You're providing raw material for designers, not art for yourself. They can always add a grain filter if they like, but they can't take one off if you've put it on. In addition, if they want a grain effect, what size are they want to print the image at?  The size of the grain desired will depend on the final reproduction size. So all you do by adding filters to your photos is to limit the sales potential.

When I make an image I like to put a little of myself in it, like a lot of us I think.
If nobody will do that all the images will be the same aseptic boring flat (and maybe it is one of the reason why there is so much &*^% on microstock sites)

If a designer can add grain or not, change color or not, etc., according to his needs, to get the image like he wants, why does he not do the picture himself, exactly as he wants we are never better served than by ourselves ;)

Concept, composition, lighting, DoF ... these are some of the things you can contribute as a photographer to make your work a unique base for the designer to work on. If you rely on photoshop filters to give your artistic imput you're probably missing something. The designer doesn't want to learn the photographer's job in addition to his own.


 

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