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Author Topic: We are in golden age of digital photography  (Read 7912 times)

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« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2014, 12:38 »
0
I don't see how that can be right. Towards the end of a roll it would have to rewind 30 frames and then wind them back on when you pressed the the shutter for the next one. My Canon 1v certainly doesn't work like that.

It's exactly, how our old Canon Cams work :D We still use the old cams, because we have to shot color slides sometimes.


« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2014, 12:46 »
0
I don't see how that can be right. Towards the end of a roll it would have to rewind 30 frames and then wind them back on when you pressed the the shutter for the next one. My Canon 1v certainly doesn't work like that.

It's exactly, how our old Canon Cams work :D We still use the old cams, because we have to shot color slides sometimes.

Which Canon camera is that? Does it wind the film into a second cassette so the film can be protected as it rewinds after it has been shot? I've never heard of anything like that. Like I say, I've got a Canon 1v film camera (that's the last and best film camera they ever made) and it winds the film onto the camera spool normally and then does a full rewind at the end of the roll. It certainly doesn't repeatedly wind it all too and fro. It has a double lock on the door to prevent accidental opening (you have to press AND slide to open the chamber).
« Last Edit: March 16, 2014, 13:05 by BaldricksTrousers »

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2014, 12:52 »
0
Photography-only manufacturers have slim chance to survive next 5 years. It looks like Sony and Samsung might be next leaders. Canon may have a chance to change its course and start supplying their technology to other companies. Nikon does not have much to offer.

Canon is busy chasing the video/movie market where they can get $10K - $30K for a camera. They seem to be spending less time on innovation with still photography. I would guess because it's probably getting more difficult to get a decent profit out of trying to compete with creating the next small-camera/big-megapixel camera.

And both Nikon and Canon have commercial products for healthcare and other industries. Sony is definitely pushing hard. I have an NEX-7 and it's great. I also have Nikon and Canon equipment which is also great.

« Reply #28 on: March 16, 2014, 13:04 »
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Yawn .. sales are declining / the sky is falling .. whatever. We're looking at an infographic based on vague stats covering a short time span .. all market's fluctuate. You could create another infographic displaying broader stats going back to film or even the early digital era and it would tell a completely opposite story with sales now booming (taking normal flux into consideration) .. sooooo what if the general public actually does stop buying mass quantities of cheap DSLRs? .. ummmm I guess camera manufacturers will go back to the same profit margin that kept them in business during the century prior to the "everybody thinks they're a photographer" trend.  :P

The sky isn't falling - not for us, anyway, the technology will still be there even if one or two makes go phut.  But is the trend in the graphic a fluctuation or a trend? Electronics tend to be embraced and discarded - I use a tower computer, those are becoming increasingly hard to find, I used to use a CRT display, they have vanished completely. 10 years is a long time for a single type of electronic product to prosper.
As well as my Canon 1v, mentioned above, I have two Pentacon Six medium format SLRs. Those were made around 1967 and 1990, near the beginning and end of the run. They sold 205,000 during the lifetime of the model. They contain all sorts of cogs and sheets of cloth and bits of cast metal, but they made economic sense to the East German makers (and the "sensor techonology" was handled by the likes of Kodak, Agfa and Ilford). I find it hard to believe that a DSLR maker can justify a product with sales of 10,000 a year (requiring a maker to produce 10,000 CMOS sensors a year), at least, not unless it sells at a very high price to those who need it.
I'm pretty sure at least one DSLR will survive for a very long time to come, but it may become a niche product for a specialist market.

« Reply #29 on: March 16, 2014, 13:11 »
0
I don't see how that can be right. Towards the end of a roll it would have to rewind 30 frames and then wind them back on when you pressed the the shutter for the next one. My Canon 1v certainly doesn't work like that.

It's exactly, how our old Canon Cams work :D We still use the old cams, because we have to shot color slides sometimes.

Which Canon camera is that? Does it wind the film into a second cassette so the film can be protected as it rewinds after it has been shot? I've never heard of anything like that. Like I say, I've got a Canon 1v film camera (that's the last and best film camera they ever made) and it winds the film onto the camera spool normally and then does a full rewind at the end of the roll. It certainly doesn't repeatedly wind it all to and fro. It has a double lock on the door to prevent accidental opening (you have to press AND slide to open the chamber).
I will look tomorrow. But I'm almost sure, that these Cams are Canon Eos 500 N and 300 N, we still use sometimes. We used about 20 Canon Cameras in the company, about 5 are still in use. If you insert the film, the whole film will completely pulled out. Then the film rewinds frame by frame.
Where are you located? Maybe only cams for the european market had this feature ?

« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2014, 13:14 »
+1
I'm pretty sure at least one DSLR will survive for a very long time to come, but it may become a niche product for a specialist market.

Yes, and it will be mine 8)

mlwinphoto

« Reply #31 on: March 16, 2014, 13:44 »
+1
If Nikon Put a Phone function In My D800. it would be perfect...LOL

If Nikon put a phone function in my D800 I'd take a sledgehammer to it....last thing I want to be bothered with out in the field....or anywhere for that matter..... ;)

Rinderart

« Reply #32 on: March 16, 2014, 14:31 »
0
It was a joke. Relax. I dont even own a cellphone.

mlwinphoto

« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2014, 15:14 »
+1
It was a joke. Relax. I dont even own a cellphone.

I know it was a joke.  I was being sarcastic, thus the 'winkie'.  I honestly couldn't tell you where my cell phone is right now so we're somewhat alike in that regard.
BTW, the minus wasn't from me.

Ron

« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2014, 15:31 »
+1
How does one receive texts without a cell phone ?

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=136173

 :)

« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2014, 16:21 »
+2
I am constantly amazed how many people and tourists carry DSLRs nowadays when I'm wandering around cities, especially in Asia.

Seems like every man and his dog is toting a massive DSLR in these places, so I'm not sure they're losing popularity even if the market is becoming saturated.

Expensive mirrorless systems are crazy popular in Japan too, so I can't see that market dying either.

Ron

« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2014, 16:52 »
+1
I was in Hyde Park in London on a shoot with two Shutterstock contributors. I had a 450D+24-70L II with me. There was an Italian couple shooting holiday snaps. They were looking at us with interest and somewhat respect, while we were setting up 3 tripods etc, looking all pro (lol) and they asked me if I could take their snap. Sure thing, and the lady handed me her Canon 6D+24-105L.  :)

« Reply #37 on: March 17, 2014, 00:24 »
0
I don't see how that can be right. Towards the end of a roll it would have to rewind 30 frames and then wind them back on when you pressed the the shutter for the next one. My Canon 1v certainly doesn't work like that.

It's exactly, how our old Canon Cams work :D We still use the old cams, because we have to shot color slides sometimes.

Which Canon camera is that? Does it wind the film into a second cassette so the film can be protected as it rewinds after it has been shot? I've never heard of anything like that. Like I say, I've got a Canon 1v film camera (that's the last and best film camera they ever made) and it winds the film onto the camera spool normally and then does a full rewind at the end of the roll. It certainly doesn't repeatedly wind it all to and fro. It has a double lock on the door to prevent accidental opening (you have to press AND slide to open the chamber).
I will look tomorrow. But I'm almost sure, that these Cams are Canon Eos 500 N and 300 N, we still use sometimes. We used about 20 Canon Cameras in the company, about 5 are still in use. If you insert the film, the whole film will completely pulled out. Then the film rewinds frame by frame.
Where are you located? Maybe only cams for the european market had this feature ?
I wasn't looking at Canon camera specs when these came out, but I can't find that feature mentioned in the literature online about them. It would mean the frames would come out numbered in reverse order, which would be a little bit odd. Is that what happens? If not, then it might just be that someone had a misunderstanding about how they work - after all, how often is a back opened by accident? I think it's only happened once to me, and that was with a Pentacon Six that locks with a sliding bar held in place by friction that you pull down to open, I jumped off a small rock and the jolt to the camera was enough to shift the bar (and the backing paper saved most of the frames).

« Reply #38 on: March 17, 2014, 01:37 »
+1
I remember those Canons that wound the entire roll forward on loading up, then gradually retracted back into the cassette frame by frame.  Years ago.

Anyway I disagree with most of this thread in several ways.  First, Canon and Nikon have got the professional sports market sewn up and that isn't going to change soon due to the speed and lenses required.  However, eventually it will be replaced by 4K video where frames can be extracted at super high quality, thus negating the need for any stills.  And when 8k comes along that will probably be the death of the stills photographer.  This is why Canon has a better chance of surviving than Nikon, and why Canon is investing so much in cinema gear.  In ten years you probably won't see a single stills photographer at the Olympics - it will all be 8k or higher video recording every split second in 35mm quality.  Just extract whatever frame you want for your web page.

Medium format will disappear as sensor technology improves.  Say goodbye to Hasselblad.  Here comes your 80mp Canon or Nikon.

These DSLR designs with mirrors and mechanical shutters are as old as the hills.  Say goodbye to mirrors and shutters.  Sony and Olympus are already doing so.  They've seen the future while Nikon and Canon mess about with mechanical designs from 50 years ago.

I like the new Sony A7r except I won't buy one because they've crippled the RAW files with compression.  That's something Nikon or Canon wouldn't do and shows Sony's immaturity and lack of experience.  But the A7r design is the way forward.  Even better the Olympus OMD series, if they can get better quality and higher resolution from that 4/3 sensor.

Five/ten years from now I'll be looking back at my current gear and laughing at its antiquity.

Edit:  I recently had a chance to try out one of the Olympus OMDs.  What a beautiful little jewel.  Camera and lenses half the size of anything made by Canon or Nikon.  Give me one of those with a 24mp sensor that can produce quality as good as my 5Dii and I'm outta here.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 02:45 by hatman12 »

Hobostocker

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« Reply #39 on: March 17, 2014, 06:26 »
0
I am constantly amazed how many people and tourists carry DSLRs nowadays when I'm wandering around cities, especially in Asia.

Seems like every man and his dog is toting a massive DSLR in these places, so I'm not sure they're losing popularity even if the market is becoming saturated.

Expensive mirrorless systems are crazy popular in Japan too, so I can't see that market dying either.

agree ! especially koreans and japanese are absolutely crazy about snapping photos but if you look carefully most of them have entry level DSLRs set in green mode and with kit lens.

i guess they buy a DSLR instead of a NEX or whatever just because they're so cheap in japan compared to their salaries, actually a good NEX is much more expensive than a 450$ nikon D3100 or whatever.

after if you enter any photo store the clerk will tell you a DSLR will make "better photos" and bla bla bla ...

Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2014, 06:30 »
-1
However, eventually it will be replaced by 4K video where frames can be extracted at super high quality, thus negating the need for any stills.  And when 8k comes along that will probably be the death of the stills photographer. 

Not yet ! 4K is still shot at 1/60 shutter speed so what are you going to do if you need a faster shutter ?

And apart this, apart rare cases the video guys are NOT photographers (and viceversa).



Hobostocker

    This user is banned.
« Reply #41 on: March 17, 2014, 06:39 »
-1
Five/ten years from now I'll be looking back at my current gear and laughing at its antiquity.

i don't think so because the ONLY radical development in DSLRs will be the move to mirrorless and the death of the mirror/reflex which is a very good thing.

while we are it, they should finally trash ISO values as they make no sense on a digital sensor, and replace it with just a generic name like "gain" or whatever.

shutter speed is also obsolete as there's no more shutter in a mirrorless camera.

it would be also very welcome if manufacturers finally agreed on a unified RAW format like DNG or whatever new buzzword.

we could throw in also face-recognition and other small cool things seen already in pocket cameras along with built-in wi-fi and FTP and maybe a wholly programmable firmware etc etc

however, none of these factors will make you take better images, it's still just a tool and it's still the photographer creating the magic.

as far as i see it, anyone buying now a nikon D4s can shoot in relax for the next 4-5 yrs and i know plenty of guys still shooting and making good money with an old D3 and D3s.






ruxpriencdiam

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  • Location. Third stone from the sun
« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2014, 07:02 »
0
Samsung and sharp are world leaders in large screen TV's and Samsung is branching out further and advancing their cell phone technology even more.

The new S5 will not only have a better newer processor and a 16MP camera it will also have and be the only cell phone that will be capable of producing 4K video that rivals what the Go Pro has.

Quote
The megapixel count these days is largely irrelevant, but the hardware's ability to process and take pictures should be considered a much larger part, and Samsung has managed that well.


And so far in the microstock world Samsung and Iphones are the cell phones that have image quality that is capable of passing image reviews on many sites. 

So the Tech is going to change all around us as we technologically advance at a more rapid rate then ever before.

http://www.techradar.com/reviews/phones/mobile-phones/samsung-galaxy-s5-1226990/review#articleContent


« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2014, 09:31 »
0
I wasn't looking at Canon camera specs when these came out, but I can't find that feature mentioned in the literature online about them. It would mean the frames would come out numbered in reverse order, which would be a little bit odd. Is that what happens? If not, then it might just be that someone had a misunderstanding about how they work - after all, how often is a back opened by accident? I think it's only happened once to me, and that was with a Pentacon Six that locks with a sliding bar held in place by friction that you pull down to open, I jumped off a small rock and the jolt to the camera was enough to shift the bar (and the backing paper saved most of the frames).
The Canon cameras were used on archaeological excavations. This is a hostile environment for Cameras - sand, dust, dirt. And many people who have no idea about photography :-) It did not happen so rarely that students or staff accidentally opened a camera. Sometimes the small gears, wich wind the film, were worn out. The gears were indeed made ​​of soft plastic. Then went nothing more and you had to open the camera.  Even the lock of the camera is not very firm. The older, cheap Canon cameras were much less robust than comparable Nikon models. But some films were partially saved because Canon cameras withdrew the film frame by frame into the cartridge. I checked today , some Canon 300 N and 500 N are still in use.


 

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