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Author Topic: What type of stock photos do sell?  (Read 2776 times)

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« on: October 19, 2008, 08:38 »
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You can see this question from time to time in the forums. Some agencies help you with this answer by providing some useful list. I some times look through this list, but often I have to search for them because a forgot where they are located. So I created this page to keep them handy.

http://photo.hlehnerer.com/WhatIsSelling.html

Please let me know if there are some missing.


« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2008, 21:21 »
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Very handy list, thank you.

It is interesting to see that several of the top SS shots are also top shots on fotolia.

I guess there is not as much depth as I would have hoped in the tastes/requirements of designers.

rinderart

« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2008, 00:20 »
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Everything sells guys. It's about how many they sell. Being unique,different and technically perfect will always rise to the top regardless of how much crap there accepting nowdays. there into numbers gang, it makes them worth more, it makes us worth less. thats the truth.

« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2008, 07:38 »
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numbers don't make them worth more, it just makes them slightly more appealing.  exclusive photographers make them worth more (good ones at least) because its something that no one else has

hali

« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2008, 16:11 »
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I can remember what an oldtimer stock contributor once told me 5 months ago when I asked her the same question. She told me, it's not what you the photographer thinks is amazing so it sells. It's what is generic that the buyer can use and use again. recycle stuff. your peers may not think it's so great a photograph.
 it's not an Ansel Adams or W E Smith, but it's something a buyer can use over and over again. I still find it hard to put on two different "head" when shooting for gallery , and then shooting for stock. but to be successful in stock, that's vital.

I hated her answer, but I realised she was, and still is right.

rinderart

« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2008, 00:50 »
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I can remember what an oldtimer stock contributor once told me 5 months ago when I asked her the same question. She told me, it's not what you the photographer thinks is amazing so it sells. It's what is generic that the buyer can use and use again. recycle stuff. your peers may not think it's so great a photograph.
 it's not an Ansel Adams or W E Smith, but it's something a buyer can use over and over again. I still find it hard to put on two different "head" when shooting for gallery , and then shooting for stock. but to be successful in stock, that's vital.

I hated her answer, but I realised she was, and still is right.

She was right and so are you My Friend. Well said.

Microbius

« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2008, 12:34 »
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I can remember what an oldtimer stock contributor once told me 5 months ago when I asked her the same question. She told me, it's not what you the photographer thinks is amazing so it sells. It's what is generic that the buyer can use and use again. recycle stuff. your peers may not think it's so great a photograph.
 it's not an Ansel Adams or W E Smith, but it's something a buyer can use over and over again. I still find it hard to put on two different "head" when shooting for gallery , and then shooting for stock. but to be successful in stock, that's vital.

I hated her answer, but I realised she was, and still is right.

Yes, 100% right.
Generic, generic, generic.
If you want to (only) create art, you're in the wrong industry.

« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2008, 16:55 »
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Mostly images with people. :)

« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2008, 17:20 »
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not necessary true, some nature picture or backgrounds are selling quite well

« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2008, 12:01 »
0
You can see this question from time to time in the forums. Some agencies help you with this answer by providing some useful list. I some times look through this list, but often I have to search for them because a forgot where they are located. So I created this page to keep them handy.

http://photo.hlehnerer.com/WhatIsSelling.html

Please let me know if there are some missing.


I have come to the conclusion that these stats are skewed and therefore probably worthless.  I know that at ss, those most popular images are, for the most part, populated by featured and free images.  So we're reading results of 2 things - one, is the result of being promoted by ss.  That gives a vague indication, but still is showing results that include images that "are not equal" in how they are being presented to the buyers.

The other is the result of giving images away.  There is no way that the popularity of a free image tells us one iota of what is selling.  To me, it's apples and oranges.


« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2008, 11:17 »
0
I can remember what an oldtimer stock contributor once told me 5 months ago when I asked her the same question. She told me, it's not what you the photographer thinks is amazing so it sells. It's what is generic that the buyer can use and use again. recycle stuff. your peers may not think it's so great a photograph.
 it's not an Ansel Adams or W E Smith, but it's something a buyer can use over and over again. I still find it hard to put on two different "head" when shooting for gallery , and then shooting for stock. but to be successful in stock, that's vital.

I hated her answer, but I realised she was, and still is right.

Amen, hali.  Peanut butter sandwiches sell better than a glorious artsy-fartsy shot of a sunset on the beach.  Sad, but true, true, true.


 

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