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Author Topic: When Customer says "I don't have a big budget"  (Read 2251 times)

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angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« on: March 20, 2017, 15:12 »
+5
I never know what to say when I get emails from potential customers for custom work and the first they they say is "I don't have a big budget"...

Any tips or suggestions on how to answer? I don't want to sound rude but it seems so many people "have a small budget" for photography/graphic design work. Some requests are so insulting, I don't even reply back.

Do people assume because you sell micro, you will accept "pennies". I don't know ... Any thoughts?


Shelma1

« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 15:23 »
+8
I've stopped responding to these people. I used to send estimates, and then of course i would never hear back from them. Waste of time. (Same thing with buyout requests from Dreamstime, in my experience.)

« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 15:26 »
+5
I always reply and point people to where they can license my work (usually putting my own site first, but listing other agencies offering it). If someone has been nice enough to include a compliment, I thank them. Depending on how they word things I point out how inexpensive the licenses are. If they ask for a freebie in return for photo credit, they get something like the following (from just such a request):

"If you mean you'd like to use it for free, I'm sorry, but that's not an option. I sell my stock images through a number of sites (list them here) but I don't give them away.

Considering you don't have to buy a long term subscription or a pile of credits to license an image, it's never been easier to license just one.

If it was a charity looking for it as a donation, I'd decide based on whether I supported the charity or not.

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 15:28 »
0
She wants "custom" work/photography so if I created the images for her and sold them as stock, she may say she owns the ideas which opens a can of worms I think ...

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2017, 15:28 »
0
I'd always reply no what they say. Just quote them your hourly rate or what you think you're work is worth. It could be a negotiation tactic, because nobody wants to spend more than they have to. If they are unwilling to meet your rate, so be it.

« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2017, 15:38 »
+16
"Tell me your budget, and I'll tell you what I can provide."

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2017, 16:07 »
+2
"Tell me your budget, and I'll tell you what I can provide."
I LIKE IT! Short, simple and to the point.

« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2017, 16:16 »
+1
Everybody gets the same quotes and I try to be polite. I usually see the same types of jobs over and over, so I probably could make a form letter. I've written the same email so many times though that it is pretty much memorized in my head anyway.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2017, 16:17 »
+3
Yeah, they can tell you what they need and you can tell them what it will cost, or they can tell you what their budget is and you can tell them what they can have.

Always wait to hear what the budget is as well before you ditch them... one person's big budget is another persons small budget, and vice versa.

« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2017, 16:27 »
+6
My favorites are posts for freelance design work with the caveat..."If you know what you are doing, this is a very simple job." And the budget is $5. I laugh and move on.

« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2017, 17:44 »
+8
It already cost me $5 of my time just to answer this Email. I can't run a business if I supply an image, with license papers, and delivery, for your price offer.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 17:46 by StanRohrer »

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2017, 18:16 »
+7
Last week I saw a job posting on a freelance website; someone asked for a 60 seconds, detailed, technical 3D animation of heavy machinery. Budget: $200.

How about a storyboard drawn on a napkin?

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2017, 19:21 »
+2
That's positively generous compared to some postings I've seen!

« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2017, 20:06 »
0
when you have free time, lower your prices. when you are busy, raise your prices.

Shelma1

« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2017, 20:16 »
+8
I'm trying to imagine a scenario where I'd ever say this to anyone.

"I'd like a burger, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like a bespoke suit, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like my hair cut and colored, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like two tons of gravel, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like your company to mow my lawn, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like you to cure this infection, but I don't have  big budget."

« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2017, 20:27 »
+1
I'm trying to imagine a scenario where I'd ever say this to anyone.

"I'd like a burger, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like a bespoke suit, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like my hair cut and colored, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like two tons of gravel, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like your company to mow my lawn, but I don't have a big budget." "I'd like you to cure this infection, but I don't have  big budget."

Replies:
I hope you dont mind your stomach growling, i hope you like hand me downs, i hope you dont look in the mirror, i hope you like dirt, i hope you dont mind gangrene

« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2017, 00:55 »
+2
I don't have a big budget?

Well they shouldn't be in business.

Walk away


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2017, 02:06 »
+3
I don't have a big budget?

Well they shouldn't be in business.

Walk away

Does everyone have to have a big budget to be in business? I think the last couple of comments are quite representative of the 'us vs. them' mentality that I often see when it comes to freelancers and clients, which probably isn't doing anyone any favours.

A) It's custom work, so the client doesn't know how much it will cost before you tell them. If it was gravel or suits, then there would be a set, advertised price... but the client may not know the freelancers rate or how much work will be involved.

B) This was used in the opening of the email, before prices were discussed. If the OP told the client the price and then they said they didn't have a big budget, that would be slightly different.

C) As it was used in the beginning of the email, we have no way to know how 'big' that budget is without discussing it further. It could be $50 for a one day shoot or it could be $5000 for a one day shoot.

D) It's hard to tell exactly what the client is trying to get across by saying that. It could be "I don't have a big budget - so you will do this work for me at less than your normal rate". If that's the case, feel free to walk away. It's just as possible that he might be saying "I don't have a big budget - so I'll completely understand if you can't take on the project". Hard to tell from the first line of an email.

E) Unless he is the "so you will do this work for me at less than your normal rate" guy, then what can it hurt to hear what he has to say? You're the expert, you know what works, the client might think he needs more than he does, or something different than what he thinks he needs. Speak to him, see what he's looking to achieve, maybe you can find a solution that solves the client's problem, but you still get your normal rate, or higher.

Shelma1

« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2017, 02:24 »
+6
It's a chronic thing that happens in the arts, and I think we're getting fed up with it. Or at least i am. People seems to attach no value to art or photography, as if the work just appears from thin air. "I have a small budget" or "I'll give you exposure"..I'm trying to imagine saying that to my vet when I bring my dog in for her very expensive checkup and echocardiogram this week.

Do you call your doctor for an appointment, not knowing what tests she'll need to run or how much they'll cost, and tell her you have a small budget? First thing, when you call?

What's the point of saying it except to pressure the person on the other end into lowering their rates for you? Otherwise you'd just say "I like your work, can you gve me an estimate for x?"

« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2017, 02:28 »
+1
I never know what to say when I get emails from potential customers for custom work and the first they they say is "I don't have a big budget"...

Any tips or suggestions on how to answer? I don't want to sound rude but it seems so many people "have a small budget" for photography/graphic design work. Some requests are so insulting, I don't even reply back.

Do people assume because you sell micro, you will accept "pennies". I don't know ... Any thoughts?

People understand very well (childish) analogies

So:
"If you have the budget to buy an Aston Martin, buy an Aston Martin. If you have not the budget to buy an Aston Martin, buy a tricycle"

« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2017, 02:43 »
+1
It's a chronic thing that happens in the arts, and I think we're getting fed up with it. Or at least i am. People seems to attach no value to art or photography, as if the work just appears from thin air. "I have a small budget" or "I'll give you exposure"..I'm trying to imagine saying that to my vet when I bring my dog in for her very expensive checkup and echocardiogram this week.

Do you call your doctor for an appointment, not knowing what tests she'll need to run or how much they'll cost, and tell her you have a small budget? First thing, when you call?

What's the point of saying it except to pressure the person on the other end into lowering their rates for you? Otherwise you'd just say "I like your work, can you gve me an estimate for x?"
Happens a lot in UK with small bands doing live music on "try out" basis etc.

« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2017, 03:40 »
0
Last time people, which state that they don't have a budget, but want a photographer to come to them for a session and then do heavy retouching, started to reference to companies which provide photography services for free. All these companies don't have photography as a main business, but ready to invest small for them money, hiring students or rotate trials. It is already in many heads here that imagery should be free, but none of these people will provide their time for free. I had several calls in enough aggressive tone, that i have no right to refuse a service, like other service providers in electricity, water etc. I have the right. Note, they don't even think to have for free a location, models, stylists, and of course, products, transport, printing etc. Only photographer or graphic designer. There are some more professions which are under the same pressure, but much less, no comparison.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #22 on: March 21, 2017, 05:08 »
+3
It's a chronic thing that happens in the arts, and I think we're getting fed up with it. Or at least i am. People seems to attach no value to art or photography, as if the work just appears from thin air. "I have a small budget" or "I'll give you exposure"..I'm trying to imagine saying that to my vet when I bring my dog in for her very expensive checkup and echocardiogram this week.

Do you call your doctor for an appointment, not knowing what tests she'll need to run or how much they'll cost, and tell her you have a small budget? First thing, when you call?

What's the point of saying it except to pressure the person on the other end into lowering their rates for you? Otherwise you'd just say "I like your work, can you gve me an estimate for x?"

No matter the reason, my rule is to always stay polite, even when people try to negotiate a reduced price.

To put it in perspective: stores and supermarkets try to get customers by providing reduced prices on clothing or shoes or handbags or food. This is no different. It's part of our business, due to heavy competition. Stick to your own prices and only accept it when you think the deal is good.

« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2017, 06:57 »
+1
They are entitled to try and negotiate you down, just don't give in.

I also always stay polite and say something like "sorry I need to price based on what I will be making working for other customers or creating work for my stock portfolio".

They can't really argue with that as it's making it clear that you wont be sitting on your hands if you don't get their job, just doing another job. Whatever they are offering has to be more than or equal to the alternative.

« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2017, 09:56 »
0

Does everyone have to have a big budget to be in business? I think the last couple of comments are quite representative of the 'us vs. them' mentality that I often see when it comes to freelancers and clients, which probably isn't doing anyone any favours.

A) It's custom work, so the client doesn't know how much it will cost before you tell them. If it was gravel or suits, then there would be a set, advertised price... but the client may not know the freelancers rate or how much work will be involved.

No, everyone doesnt have to have a big budget. But I don't care what part of the world you are in...doing any kind of job for $5 is just ridiculous, especially when not for a repeat client. I can't read thru the job description, download files, and write the job ticket for $5! And when someone in the US expects to pay that for any kind of work from a freelancer living in the US, then I guess I will be dying a pauper because i am willing to bet that person expecting to pay that makes a whole lot of money themself and would never dream of accepting $5 for their work. Think micro agencies aka greedy ba$tards.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 10:07 by cathyslife »


 

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