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Author Topic: Why eps  (Read 2784 times)

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« on: February 09, 2018, 16:14 »
0
For which reason vector files should be saved in eps and not Ai?


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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2018, 17:10 »
+2
Because .eps is a universal format and .ai isn't.

It's like a .jpg instead of a .psd.

« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2018, 17:21 »
+1
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

JimP

« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2018, 17:59 »
0
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

Is pdf a vector format that can be scaled? May be a good idea.

« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2018, 22:57 »
0
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

Is pdf a vector format that can be scaled? May be a good idea.

Yes, PDF can be both vector as well as raster.

« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2018, 00:17 »
0
It's really an old requirement that hasn't been fixed. There's really no real reason anymore, although the old no frills eps 8 files still work pretty well.

« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2018, 06:04 »
0
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

Is pdf a vector format that can be scaled? May be a good idea.

In fact pdf is not exactly a "format" it is a container of formats.
It can contain anything, vector, bitmap, animation, sound, etc.

It's really an old requirement that hasn't been fixed. There's really no real reason anymore, although the old no frills eps 8 files still work pretty well.

I completely agree. Today (and these last 10 years) there are no software not able to open more modern eps formats than eps 10.
The computers and the operating systems that we all use today cannot even run the old versions of illustrator opening no more that eps10
I think that on the modern Macs and PCs with not so much new versions of their systems you cannot use Adobe softwares previous to CC CS versions. And it is probably the same with the latest versions of free softwares like Gimp or InkScape. So eps 8 and 10 are just an antique absurdity.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 10:46 by Chichikov »

niktol

« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2018, 09:13 »
0
although the old no frills eps 8 files still work pretty well.

And that's pretty much it. Very often the best policy is, if it ain't broke don't fix it.  If you are the size of SS and you start upgrading stuff, how many clients start complaining that their freeware they got god knows where is no longer compatible, printers they looted during WWI start printing gibberish, and cancelling subscriptions. And yet you have to pay your workers every two weeks and make shareholders happy.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2018, 11:19 »
0
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

Makes sense, everyone can open and work with PDFs.

« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2018, 18:28 »
0
Can other vector softwares recognize AI format or only eps?


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« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2018, 20:17 »
+1
Not everyone can open and work with pdf files.   

« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2018, 20:52 »
0
And why not pdf?
Today pdf is more universal that the eps, and it can contain the vector file and the jpeg preview.

My guess is to limit the things that get uploaded and ease the review process. .pdf can contain all sorts of different (and even interactive) elements. Whereas .eps basically ensures that it's a proper vector file.

« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2018, 21:27 »
0
My guess is to limit the things that get uploaded and ease the review process. .pdf can contain all sorts of different (and even interactive) elements. Whereas .eps basically ensures that it's a proper vector file.

You can place raster elements, fonts, etc. in an eps as well. I assume most of it is just old school design. Back in the QuarkXpress days, you really dealt with two main file formats TIFF and EPS.

« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2018, 02:13 »
+1
Not everyone can open and work with pdf files.
Not everyone can open and work with eps files
So?

« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2018, 19:19 »
0
My guess is to limit the things that get uploaded and ease the review process. .pdf can contain all sorts of different (and even interactive) elements. Whereas .eps basically ensures that it's a proper vector file.

You can place raster elements, fonts, etc. in an eps as well. I assume most of it is just old school design. Back in the QuarkXpress days, you really dealt with two main file formats TIFF and EPS.

Right but, they're way easy to see.

I bought someone's crappy eps the other day with raster elements in it. Irritating ... EPS is more cross-compatible with older software and corel/adobe/whatever. Like, I have a friend that runs a metal cutter and uses some silly free software. In order to use elements it has to be EPS, and then SVG and then some software thing converts it into odd like, on/off paths ... it was quite confusing when he first set it up.

« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2018, 20:31 »
0
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2018, 18:10 »
0
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

lol. It's certainly a loud, hot embroidery machine. I think after he's got all the paths set up and stuff he archives them as .dst? ... I can't be certain, it's been a while since I've been down there. I just know that when sending him stuff .eps or .svg were the only things he could import.


« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2018, 09:39 »
+1
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

lol. It's certainly a loud, hot embroidery machine. I think after he's got all the paths set up and stuff he archives them as .dst? ... I can't be certain, it's been a while since I've been down there. I just know that when sending him stuff .eps or .svg were the only things he could import.

I think it's funny that when we talk about codec standards, graphics standards, CDs went through many standards as DVD tried a few more, embroidery or vector standards, there's always a long list that comes from each company or software having their own version of what's right, or trying to control how we work by making their "standard" only work with their software, products or machines. Or at the least makes working with their standard difficult for others. What kind of raw do you have and why does it change? Obsolete standards are more and more difficult as they become impossible to open and use, without old software or computers.

I think the why to EPS is simple that more people can open and work with that and have. Doesn't mean it's better, just that it's most used and universal. PDF is definitely more universal, free software to open and read, used for documents, has security and portability pretty much any device can read them. I wouldn't know how to extract a vector or insert one in a PDF?

« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2018, 11:25 »
0
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

lol. It's certainly a loud, hot embroidery machine. I think after he's got all the paths set up and stuff he archives them as .dst? ... I can't be certain, it's been a while since I've been down there. I just know that when sending him stuff .eps or .svg were the only things he could import.

I think it's funny that when we talk about codec standards, graphics standards, CDs went through many standards as DVD tried a few more, embroidery or vector standards, there's always a long list that comes from each company or software having their own version of what's right, or trying to control how we work by making their "standard" only work with their software, products or machines. Or at the least makes working with their standard difficult for others. What kind of raw do you have and why does it change? Obsolete standards are more and more difficult as they become impossible to open and use, without old software or computers.

I think the why to EPS is simple that more people can open and work with that and have. Doesn't mean it's better, just that it's most used and universal. PDF is definitely more universal, free software to open and read, used for documents, has security and portability pretty much any device can read them. I wouldn't know how to extract a vector or insert one in a PDF?
To extract an eps from a pdf: open the pdf with Illustrator (or other software supporting vectors)
To insert a vector in a pdf: save your vector file in pdf format from the software you have used to create it.

« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2018, 18:39 »
0
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

lol. It's certainly a loud, hot embroidery machine. I think after he's got all the paths set up and stuff he archives them as .dst? ... I can't be certain, it's been a while since I've been down there. I just know that when sending him stuff .eps or .svg were the only things he could import.

I think it's funny that when we talk about codec standards, graphics standards, CDs went through many standards as DVD tried a few more, embroidery or vector standards, there's always a long list that comes from each company or software having their own version of what's right, or trying to control how we work by making their "standard" only work with their software, products or machines. Or at the least makes working with their standard difficult for others. What kind of raw do you have and why does it change? Obsolete standards are more and more difficult as they become impossible to open and use, without old software or computers.

I think the why to EPS is simple that more people can open and work with that and have. Doesn't mean it's better, just that it's most used and universal. PDF is definitely more universal, free software to open and read, used for documents, has security and portability pretty much any device can read them. I wouldn't know how to extract a vector or insert one in a PDF?
To extract an eps from a pdf: open the pdf with Illustrator (or other software supporting vectors)
To insert a vector in a pdf: save your vector file in pdf format from the software you have used to create it.

It often has a clipping mask around the art as well that is nice to remove. Otherwise spot on.

« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2018, 21:17 »
0
.jef - The stitch-based file that is read by the MemoryCraft 10000.

.sew - The stitch-based file format used by MemoryCraft 5700, 8000, and 9000 machines.

.pes - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.pec - A stitch-based file format used by Brother and Babylock embroidery home sewing machines.

.hus - The stitch-based file format used by Husqvarna/Viking embroidery home sewing machines.

.pcs - The stitch-based file format used by Pfaff embroidery home sewing machines.

.csd - The stitch-based file format used by Poem, Huskygram, and Singer EU embroidery home sewing machines.

.xxx - The stitch-based file format used by Singer embroidery home sewing machines.

.dst - The stitch-based file format used by Tajima commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.exp - The stitch-based file format used by Melco commercial embroidery sewing machines.

.jan - The file is the file that contains the embroidery's object properties.

lol. It's certainly a loud, hot embroidery machine. I think after he's got all the paths set up and stuff he archives them as .dst? ... I can't be certain, it's been a while since I've been down there. I just know that when sending him stuff .eps or .svg were the only things he could import.

I think it's funny that when we talk about codec standards, graphics standards, CDs went through many standards as DVD tried a few more, embroidery or vector standards, there's always a long list that comes from each company or software having their own version of what's right, or trying to control how we work by making their "standard" only work with their software, products or machines. Or at the least makes working with their standard difficult for others. What kind of raw do you have and why does it change? Obsolete standards are more and more difficult as they become impossible to open and use, without old software or computers.

I think the why to EPS is simple that more people can open and work with that and have. Doesn't mean it's better, just that it's most used and universal. PDF is definitely more universal, free software to open and read, used for documents, has security and portability pretty much any device can read them. I wouldn't know how to extract a vector or insert one in a PDF?
To extract an eps from a pdf: open the pdf with Illustrator (or other software supporting vectors)
To insert a vector in a pdf: save your vector file in pdf format from the software you have used to create it.

Never knew that I could because I use PDF software to open PDF. Good to know.


 

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