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Author Topic: Microstock Video - stock agency summary / overview  (Read 11933 times)

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« on: June 09, 2008, 17:11 »
0
Here is a list over what the various stock sites require in regards to stock video.
you can post in this thread if there are any updates and I can change the first post of this thread so that it keeps up to date.


Shutterstock

Footage submitted should be digital only and we will try to accommodate any file type, including DV, Windows Media, and QuickTime.
Minimum 480 pixels in height
aspect ratio of at least 4:3.
NTSC standard of 29.97fps (frames per second)  (pal - 25fps also accepted)
No longer than 60 seconds.

Istock


istock training manual

StockXpert

    * Leave 1 second of padding on each end of the clip (exceptions are looping videos)
    * No black bars on any end of any clip.
    * No Audio in any clip.
    * Accepted formats
          o PhotoJPG
          o PNG
          o MJPEG-A/B
          o H.264
          o Animation



stockxpert info page

other sites to check out
Pond5 http://www.pond5.com/
Interclips http://www.interclips.net/
Motionsdrops http://www.motiondrops.com/
http://www.revostock.com/
« Last Edit: December 09, 2008, 03:42 by leaf »


jsnover

« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2008, 17:13 »
0
http://stockxpert.com/browse_video.php
Stockxpert too.

And it should be summary

« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2008, 17:15 »
0
http://stockxpert.com/browse_video.php
Stockxpert too.

And it should be summary


thanks (for both spelling teacher and stockxpert tip :))

I since i couldn't spell I was bad at it.

« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2008, 17:26 »
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surprising that stockxpert doesn't want ANY sound on the video!

« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2008, 18:34 »
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Don't forget Pond5. Video only, no photos, but definately worth it. You can set your own price or let them set it for you! Sales aren't quite as frequent as SS or IS, but the 50% commission is nice.

P5 Footage Requirements

Referral Link

Non-referral Link

« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2008, 20:10 »
0
So, what's the entry level videocam for the major brands out there that can be used to submit footage to microstock video sites? Something like Rebel for Canon for camera.

« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2008, 20:57 »
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Pardon my ignorance, but are videos made with a P&S unsuitable for stock standards?  In my case (Canon A620) they are AVIs, 640x480, 30fps.  I suppose I can resave AVIs to MOV or whatever, but I have no clue about quality issues. 

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2008, 23:35 »
0
Any Mini-DV camera will do for SD video, as well as most DVD and hard disk cameras (JVC everio series, etc.). Compact photo cameras are generally not accepted by the micro-video sites, but you might be able to sneak a couple of clips through at 640x480 30FPS. You should be looking for either 480x720 30(29.97)FPS for NTSC or 576x720 25FPS for PAL.

If you're just now shopping for a camera for stock video, I would urge you to consider at least a consumer level HDV camera. With HDV cameras going for under $1000 USD, theres really no reason (aside from being on a very tight budget) not to future proof your video. I use the Canon HV-10, but the current HV-30 looks like a great cam. I'm saving up for the XH-A1 or a Sony XDCam next. (the cost of SxS cards may keep me away though)

If you do go the HD route, most recommend sticking with tape for now, the hard disk and dvd cameras use the AVC-HD codec which is considered lower quality than the tape based HDV cameras.


It's a bit strange switching from photo to video hardware. I'll try to make an analogy in terms of Canon's products:

Basic consumer level SD camcorders, like the Canon ZR series, are about equivelant to the Powershot ELPH series in terms of controll (point and shoot) and quality (good, but not spectacular).

High-end SD camcorders like the Canon XL-2 have interchangeable lenses and full contoll and connectivity like a DSLR.

Similarly on the HD front, the consumer level HV series are essentially point and shoot cameras, although their image quality is much closer to their more expensive counterparts, think Powershot A series.

The XH-A1 and XH-G1 would be your G series powershots. Great image quality and full controll with a fixed lens.

The XL-H1 is your DSLR, professional quality, interchangeable lenses and full controll and connectivity.

I hope this helps a bit.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 23:36 by nickp37 »

« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2008, 01:15 »
0
I ended up buying a canon HV30

 

I figured that even though it is a point and shoot style camera it has high resolution and a decent place to start.  If i like video and want to do more, perhaps I would invest in a higher quality camera in the future.

I just went through istock's application process yesterday and found out that yes, you CAN submit footage from a point and shoot camera like the canon powershot series, but the quality had better be VERY good and the resolution above the minimum.  So i feel this is saying, you can, but it probably won't be accepted.  Like shooting stills with a powershot.  It willl work, but you will have a hard time getting them accepted.


« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2008, 01:43 »
0
Leaf,

With the HV-30 can you controll Iris, Shutter and Gain at once (full manual)? Or does it only have Av, Tv, P, and exposure shift(EC) like the HV-10?

« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2008, 01:47 »
0
Leaf,

With the HV-30 can you controll Iris, Shutter and Gain at once (full manual)? Or does it only have Av, Tv, P, and exposure shift(EC) like the HV-10?

It has only the Av and Tv modes plus full automatic, but then you can adjust brightness down or up a couple stops if you want.  So no, full manual does not exist (as far as i know).  So yeah, like the HV10.

It is also rather cumbersome to navigate to those settings, like a point and shoot still camera would be.  When i shot video last, i changed the aperature to what i wanted always, but it took a few clicks and menus to get it there.

« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2008, 01:59 »
0
Thanks, I wasn't sure about that. Pity though. If it had manual I'd buy it tomorrow. Guess I'll keep saving for the A1.

There's a trick to controlling the gain by the way.  Tv -- 1/60 -- cover the lens with your hand -- press exposure -- dial it down to -11 (minus 11) -- uncover the lens -- adjust exposure as needed. This opens the Iris (aperture) all the way and keeps gain (ISO) to an absolute minimum. Use this in low light for cleaner images. It's as close to manual as I can get.

« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2008, 02:06 »
0

« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2008, 09:29 »
0
Any Mini-DV camera will do for SD video, as well as most DVD and hard disk cameras (JVC everio series, etc.). Compact photo cameras are generally not accepted by the micro-video sites, but you might be able to sneak a couple of clips through at 640x480 30FPS. You should be looking for either 480x720 30(29.97)FPS for NTSC or 576x720 25FPS for PAL.

If you're just now shopping for a camera for stock video, I would urge you to consider at least a consumer level HDV camera. With HDV cameras going for under $1000 USD, theres really no reason (aside from being on a very tight budget) not to future proof your video. I use the Canon HV-10, but the current HV-30 looks like a great cam. I'm saving up for the XH-A1 or a Sony XDCam next. (the cost of SxS cards may keep me away though)

If you do go the HD route, most recommend sticking with tape for now, the hard disk and dvd cameras use the AVC-HD codec which is considered lower quality than the tape based HDV cameras.


It's a bit strange switching from photo to video hardware. I'll try to make an analogy in terms of Canon's products:

Basic consumer level SD camcorders, like the Canon ZR series, are about equivelant to the Powershot ELPH series in terms of controll (point and shoot) and quality (good, but not spectacular).

High-end SD camcorders like the Canon XL-2 have interchangeable lenses and full contoll and connectivity like a DSLR.

Similarly on the HD front, the consumer level HV series are essentially point and shoot cameras, although their image quality is much closer to their more expensive counterparts, think Powershot A series.

The XH-A1 and XH-G1 would be your G series powershots. Great image quality and full controll with a fixed lens.

The XL-H1 is your DSLR, professional quality, interchangeable lenses and full controll and connectivity.

I hope this helps a bit.

Thanks, that helps a lot.
Any other brand besides Canon worthy to be considered? Sony, maybe?

« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2008, 11:34 »
0
Any other brand besides Canon worthy to be considered? Sony, maybe?

For SD, any of the offerings from Canon, Sony, Panasonic, or JVC should be good. I like the Pana PVGS-320 or PVGS-500 3CCD cams.

For HD, Canon and Sony have great HDV cameras.

« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2008, 07:38 »
0
any more news here?

is it just stockxpert, shutterstock and istock which accept video?

« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2008, 10:45 »
0
There are also:

Pond5 http://www.pond5.com/
Interclips http://www.interclips.net/
Motionsdrops http://www.motiondrops.com/

I don't have videos on Interclips and Motionsdrops, but Pond5 is not bad. I have actually sold more videos there than at Shutterstock.

grp_photo

« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2008, 13:16 »
0
any more news here?

is it just stockxpert, shutterstock and istock which accept video?

http://www.revostock.com/

« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2008, 16:37 »
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Do any of these sites accept videos taken with a compact camera such as my Canon Powershot A620?

« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2008, 17:36 »
0
Do any of these sites accept videos taken with a compact camera such as my Canon Powershot A620?

I looked through the various forums and I don't think you will get any accepted.  The videos are compressed too much and are low quality.  They do accept time lapse or stop motion clips taken with a series of stills from a compact digital camera.

« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2008, 09:00 »
0
I sell on most of the above Video Sites and got to say sell 3 times as much on Pond5 pretty much every month compared to other places and the commission is better than the other sites and you set your own prices ...


Referral Link

http://www.pond5.com/index.php?ref=fxlibrary
« Last Edit: December 09, 2008, 09:26 by bestshotz »

« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2008, 10:35 »
0
Don't forget Pond5. Video only, no photos, but definately worth it. You can set your own price or let them set it for you! Sales aren't quite as frequent as SS or IS, but the 50% commission is nice.

P5 Footage Requirements

Referral Link

Non-referral Link


ok, well i guess i will try pond5 out.

I used your referral link nickp37, I hope you get credit for it.... your link is faulty though btw - i had to enter your name manually.

« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2009, 09:49 »
0
Hi, I'm new to footage. For stockxpert - what is the 1 sec padding (just blank space in the timeline or do I dissolve to black?)

How many different workflows are required for the different agencies. Can I submit the same clip to istock, stockexpert, shutterstock and pond5? I uploaded my first clip to SS but converted to 29.97 frames per sec from the native 30 frames per second - would they have accepted the 30? Would SS and the others accept the 1 sec padding?

Thanks, just trying to make sense of all the different requirements.

John

« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2012, 05:18 »
0
I do not remove logos from videos; I do not sell much there, so I don't bother uploading anything with a logo there.

« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2012, 06:33 »
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Old Thread.... 


 

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