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Author Topic: Need suggestion for the price (footage with all rights)  (Read 1213 times)

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« on: May 05, 2017, 02:15 »
0
Hi guys,

Somebody contacted me and he wants to buy one of my footage with all the rights.
What do you think is a fair price? The footage is city timelapse.

Thank you :)


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2017, 03:19 »
+2
I'd take current sales for a year, or extrapolate to get a years worth of figures... multiply it by four and that's probably a reasonable price. Two years would probably be fair, but then your also adding a bit of a markup and accounting for if your clip becomes more popular over time.

You'll probably get a bunch of people saying you should charge $5K, but how realistic is it anybody is going to pay that? They'd be cheaper hiring a professional to shoot it for them. And if it's making you $25 to $50 a month then that's maybe a bit extreme.

Take the $1K or whatever it works out to, go and shoot a new version of the clip, and everyone's a winner!
« Last Edit: May 05, 2017, 04:36 by SpaceStockFootage »

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2017, 04:16 »
+1
Let me be the first to say: charge $5K or more. Keep in mind that if the full rights to an image (photo or illustration) can be sold for a couple of thousands, then a well shot video should be worth much more than that.

Take the expected revenue for the clip for the next 3-5 years, triple that and add some markup. Otherwise, what's the point, right?

Also consider who you're selling to and what they plan to do with it. They're not requesting a buyout for nothing. Bigger companies can afford more. All in all, don't cut yourself short.

« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2017, 04:25 »
0
Ask yourself this:

Do I need money NOW?

What is this clip likely to earn over the next 5 years?

Can I redo something similar without too much effort?

« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2017, 04:52 »
0
Ask yourself this:

Do I need money NOW?

What is this clip likely to earn over the next 5 years?

Can I redo something similar without too much effort?
Let me be the first to say: charge $5K or more. Keep in mind that if the full rights to an image (photo or illustration) can be sold for a couple of thousands, then a well shot video should be worth much more than that.

Take the expected revenue for the clip for the next 3-5 years, triple that and add some markup. Otherwise, what's the point, right?

Also consider who you're selling to and what they plan to do with it. They're not requesting a buyout for nothing. Bigger companies can afford more. All in all, don't cut yourself short.
I'd take current sales for a year, or extrapolate to get a years worth of figures... multiply it by four and that's probably a reasonable price. Two years would probably be fair, but then your also adding a bit of a markup and accounting for if your clip becomes more popular over time.

You'll probably get a bunch of people saying you should charge $5K, but how realistic is it anybody is going to pay that? They'd be cheaper hiring a professional to shoot it for them. And if it's making you $25 to $50 a month then that's maybe a bit extreme.

Take the $1K or whatever it works out to, go and shoot a new version of the clip, and everyone's a winner!

Thank you guys for all the input, I appreciate it so much. Honestly, at first I think I'm going to charge them $500. After hearing all your opinions most likely I'll be more confident to go over $1K.

« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2017, 04:56 »
0
I have clips that earned me 5k+ directly. But indirectly they are worth even more, because those clips drew customers to similar clips in my portfolio.

Don't sell it for cheap, because it's probably a good clip, exactly what they want, otherwise they won't ask for exclusivity. Make sure they don't want to buy it for resale as stock, that would be like shooting yourself in the foot.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2017, 10:00 »
+2
With all due respect, but $500 for the full rights? Really? Are you sure the clip won't earn you more than $500 in your lifetime?

« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2017, 10:48 »
0
I'd take current sales for a year, or extrapolate to get a years worth of figures... multiply it by four and that's probably a reasonable price. Two years would probably be fair, but then your also adding a bit of a markup and accounting for if your clip becomes more popular over time.


I agree. That's what I would do with an illo. If a particular one did not sell, I would use an average.

« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2017, 17:12 »
0
$10,000

« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2017, 17:50 »
0
Ask yourself this:

Do I need money NOW?

What is this clip likely to earn over the next 5 years?

Can I redo something similar without too much effort?
Let me be the first to say: charge $5K or more. Keep in mind that if the full rights to an image (photo or illustration) can be sold for a couple of thousands, then a well shot video should be worth much more than that.

Take the expected revenue for the clip for the next 3-5 years, triple that and add some markup. Otherwise, what's the point, right?

Also consider who you're selling to and what they plan to do with it. They're not requesting a buyout for nothing. Bigger companies can afford more. All in all, don't cut yourself short.
I'd take current sales for a year, or extrapolate to get a years worth of figures... multiply it by four and that's probably a reasonable price. Two years would probably be fair, but then your also adding a bit of a markup and accounting for if your clip becomes more popular over time.

You'll probably get a bunch of people saying you should charge $5K, but how realistic is it anybody is going to pay that? They'd be cheaper hiring a professional to shoot it for them. And if it's making you $25 to $50 a month then that's maybe a bit extreme.

Take the $1K or whatever it works out to, go and shoot a new version of the clip, and everyone's a winner!

Thank you guys for all the input, I appreciate it so much. Honestly, at first I think I'm going to charge them $500. After hearing all your opinions most likely I'll be more confident to go over $1K.

A lot of the strategy around hooking the customer is whether they are conditioned by $79 pricing.  If you doubled or even tripled the price they might bite. If there are a lot of similar clips then the customer is less likely to bite with any higher pricing. If you simply don't care whether you sell it or not, charge whatever - $1000 or $2000 or whatever. And if they buy it, great. Like others have said, consider its salability over a period. I would then double that. So if the clip sells 4x per year at $79, I would use (4x79)*5=$1580.


 

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