pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: New Hyperlapse seller + general questions  (Read 3279 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« Reply #25 on: June 06, 2017, 07:51 »
0
Not many buyers use a full 10 seconds of a hyperlapse. In fact, 2 seconds is more normal.

10 seconds is often not even practically possible, and adds so much time, but I would aim for 6 seconds at 24 fps = 144 images at least. Most agencies require a minimum of 5 seconds.

I usually do at least 160 images so I have some room to edit. Of course, if the situation lends itself to longer sequences with not much extra hassle, I do that.

I would rather give them 10 seconds so they have a "menu" to choose from...picking a part of that clip that best fits their needs.  I've been getting more into time lapse and all the workshops I take the instructors want only short clips...5-10 seconds.  It's hard to break my rules of uploading 20 second clips. A 20 second time lapse can take 30 minutes to 5 hours depending on what time of day you shoot.  Anyhow, just my 2 cents on duration.  Interestingly, if you walk into Costco to the TV section, most of the flagship TV's are playing time laps clips, and most are doing 3-5 second clips them move on to a new clip.  Basically a big B-roll kind of thing with 3-5 sec clips.


« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2017, 08:46 »
0
Not many buyers use a full 10 seconds of a hyperlapse. In fact, 2 seconds is more normal.

10 seconds is often not even practically possible, and adds so much time, but I would aim for 6 seconds at 24 fps = 144 images at least. Most agencies require a minimum of 5 seconds.

I usually do at least 160 images so I have some room to edit. Of course, if the situation lends itself to longer sequences with not much extra hassle, I do that.

I would rather give them 10 seconds so they have a "menu" to choose from...picking a part of that clip that best fits their needs.  I've been getting more into time lapse and all the workshops I take the instructors want only short clips...5-10 seconds.  It's hard to break my rules of uploading 20 second clips. A 20 second time lapse can take 30 minutes to 5 hours depending on what time of day you shoot.  Anyhow, just my 2 cents on duration.  Interestingly, if you walk into Costco to the TV section, most of the flagship TV's are playing time laps clips, and most are doing 3-5 second clips them move on to a new clip.  Basically a big B-roll kind of thing with 3-5 sec clips.

Timelapses and hyperlapses are not really comparable. The work that goes into a hyperlapse is more than 10-50 times as time consuming compared to just a timelapse. Very few locations are ideal for hyperlapses compared to timelapses. You need lots of space, and that space needs to be set up so that you can move in a perfect line or arc over a great distance. The post processing is very time consuming and at times you just have to throw away the project because it just doesn't work.

Come back when you've tried to do 10-20 hyperlapses with post processing and I'm sure you'll have a different opinion.  :)

But of course, if there's not much extra work and it's practically possible, it's always easier to shorten than to lengthen...
« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 10:32 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #27 on: June 06, 2017, 10:48 »
0
I once tried to shoot a hyperlapse from a ferry but I had trouble keeping stable - can't remember why but I didn't have the luxury of leaning against the side railing.

Well, you would use a tripod unless there are severe micro vibrations and you want/need a slow shutter speed.

« Reply #28 on: June 07, 2017, 10:46 »
0
Well, you would use a tripod unless there are severe micro vibrations and you want/need a slow shutter speed.

There's a guy who shoots hyperlapses from boats / ferries hand held and the results are very good. Regardless, if I was going to use slow shutter speeds, I would definitely be using a tripod.

« Reply #29 on: June 07, 2017, 11:09 »
+1
I'd imagine a tripod would be worse on a boat.  At least handheld you can try to keep the camera level while a tripod would pitch with the boat.  But what do I know?

« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2017, 11:17 »
0
I did quite a few hyperlapses from boats on the river Thames in London.
The big problem is when some other boat goes through and makes big waves. It is a nightmare to fix in post, as the whole thing moves in all directions

« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2017, 11:23 »
0
Well, a tripod is best on a BIG boat, aka ferry, that doesn't move too much. Obviously smaller boats and waves will make it a bit more challenging... There is only one thing that COULD result in perfect smoothness but I'll let you figure that one out.  ;)

Anything other than a fixed rail, ropes or really steady wheels will of course need stabilization work. Even slider timelapses can need some stabilization to look perfect.

« Reply #32 on: June 07, 2017, 11:47 »
0
One night, I was doing a hyperlapse of a church in my city. This church was illuminated by flood lighting. I had been shooting away for what seemed like hours - carefully moving the tripod step by step. Each individual shot was a long exposure so that it extended the duration of the shoot by quite a significant degree. When I was less than half way through shooting, the church's lighting was turned off. Woops - I didn't see that coming (I just assumed it would stay lit all night.) At that point, the only thing I could do was pack up and go home.

« Reply #33 on: June 07, 2017, 11:50 »
0
When I was less than half way through

Haha, yep, it happens. And a long exposure hyperlapse takes a looong time...

I usually keep the shorter clips though because even 1-2 seconds can be very useful in my own short films, even if I can't sell them as stock.

« Reply #34 on: June 07, 2017, 21:17 »
0
Thats a cool timelapse.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk


« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2017, 02:47 »
0
Neat hearing all your stories and experiences :)

Yeah Ive shot from a boat, ferry is best or large ship, smaller boat is ok if very stable and nice course
Used tripod for nighttime and its so challenging, the part about throwing away work hit home...
the part about spending hours on a night shoot and having it ruined hit home... it was an incredible amount of work,
Ive got 200 clips finished, probably 70 in the showreel, probably another 200 more clips that look okay but not worth the time..
Ive probably shot 800 clips total, hundreds of hours traveling and shooting stuff that didnt work

The processing... trial and error.... warp stabilizer.... for hours and hours


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
19 Replies
5194 Views
Last post October 01, 2007, 21:53
by Kngkyle
10 Replies
1925 Views
Last post May 09, 2013, 12:57
by RGebbiePhoto
3 Replies
1057 Views
Last post August 11, 2013, 12:55
by DallasP
2 Replies
1342 Views
Last post January 02, 2014, 00:14
by Uncle Pete
12 Replies
2008 Views
Last post January 06, 2014, 16:27
by Uncle Pete

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors