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Author Topic: Ultra HD animation footage selling?  (Read 903 times)

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« on: April 28, 2017, 15:17 »
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Hi, has anyone had more than one Ultra HD animation or footage sold yet? I could be wrong but it appears that after years of it being a 'standard' its mainstream adoption seems to be rather slow.

Up until now I've personally held off at creating projects @ 3840 x 2160 but am thinking about giving it a try just to test the water.

Or is the market waiting for 10K?

Thanks.


« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2017, 15:26 »
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I don't have many animations (yet) but I do sell some 4k footage when the price isn't too high.

That being said, 1080p is still the standard and it will be good enough for most people for many years.

Sitting in front of the computer screen looking at 4k means a lot more detail than HD, but sitting in the couch looking at a TV a few meters away makes it hard for people to actually notice a great benefit of 4k.

I don't think 8k/10k/16k will be used that much, simply because we can't really see the difference in most situations. At some point, which is close, we reach the point where we simply can't benefit anymore from higher resolution. It happened many years ago with audio and 16-bit 44.1khz is still the standard today, simply because most ears cannot hear anything above that quality.

Huge screens broadcasting sporting events will of course benefit from 8k but on TV, HD is enough for most people.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 16:13 »
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I've sold some 4K videos. HD is still sold more often, but that will undoubtedly change gradually over the years.

« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2017, 17:30 »
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Sitting in front of the computer screen looking at 4k means a lot more detail than HD, but sitting in the couch looking at a TV a few meters away makes it hard for people to actually notice a great benefit of 4k.

I've always thought this as well which makes me still question if it's really worth it. For instance I remember back in day the difference between DVD and Full HD was like night and day personally, and on say a 42 inch TV I currently struggle to see the same wow factor from Full HD to 4K although TV manufacturers marketing departments would have you believe otherwise.

I asked my Dad if he would buy a 4K TV and he wasn't interested and I don't think most average households are that excited about ditching their current TV just to buy a 4K one. So that basically sums up the end user market trend, so I then tried to think of other markets such as blu-ray or the conference events industry and those aren't huge either. Are there other markets?

I'm guessing that everyone will eventually have a 4K capable TV when their current one stops working but how long will that be?

I've sold some 4K videos. HD is still sold more often, but that will undoubtedly change gradually over the years.

That's encouraging, will you keep on creating animations or footage in 4K?


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2017, 01:17 »
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I've had a lot of 4K sales, but it's still only a fraction of the amount I sell in HD. Only had one 4K sale at VideoBlocks, but it's a nice treat to get an email saying you've made $191.54 from just one sale! For me, I'd say it just about makes it worthwhile for the extra time and effort, so I'll keep on making 4K content when I can, but I'm hoping it'll pay off more as time goes on and 4K sales (hopefully) increase.

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2017, 09:36 »
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I've sold some 4K videos. HD is still sold more often, but that will undoubtedly change gradually over the years.

That's encouraging, will you keep on creating animations or footage in 4K?



Certainly, because 4K is more future-proof than HD. And because I make animations, creating 4K resolution isn't more costly than HD (save storage space cost, but that's negligible).

« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2017, 09:44 »
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Even if the end use won't be 4k, it still allows the client to customize the clip (zoom in, pan etc.) while keeping full HD quality.

Naturally, if you can, provide 4k. I do 4096x2304 (true 4k) when my source is bigger (timelapses) and UHD when filming.

Filming in 4k (UHD) has also saved clips where my focus was slightly off since they can be used as HD and look sharp.


 

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