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Author Topic: Castles in Europe need a property release now?  (Read 1687 times)

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« on: February 17, 2012, 14:36 »
0
Nice, they just killed my best earner :)
Got to love them even more.


traveler1116

« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2012, 14:37 »
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Was it from France?

RT


« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 15:00 »
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Just buy your own castle - problem solved  ;D

« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2012, 17:24 »
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Was it from France?

Neuschweinstein in Bavaria, Germany.

Just buy your own castle - problem solved  ;D

Why did I think about that? :P

cascoly

  • Photography, travel & online games at cascoly.com

« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2012, 18:04 »
0
Was it from France?

Neuschweinstein in Bavaria, Germany.

 
Why did I think about that? :P


it is one of the most recognizable castles in the world - part of mad king ludwig's collection

that castle is the basis for disney's cinderella castles
in movie and theme parks
disney used the st hilarion castle in cyprus for sleeping beauty

« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2012, 19:25 »
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Coincidently I just bought a castle  ;D  (an image rendering as I type)

« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2012, 07:46 »
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Did they mention if it was allowed for editorial use?


microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2012, 10:19 »
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Neuschweinstein in Bavaria, Germany.

It makes even less sense, since there's a thing called "Panoramafreiheit" in Germany.
If they wish to apply strict rules, they should at least know them.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2012, 10:22 by microstockphoto.co.uk »

traveler1116

« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2012, 11:48 »
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Neuschweinstein in Bavaria, Germany.

It makes even less sense, since there's a thing called "Panoramafreiheit" in Germany.
If they wish to apply strict rules, they should at least know them.
Just looking at wikipedia for "freedom of panorama" they have this "Many laws have subtle differences in regard to public space and private property. Whereas the photographer's location is irrelevant in Austria[1], in Germany the permission applies only if the image was taken from public ground, and without any further utilities such as ladders, lifting platforms, airplanes etc.[3] Under certain circumstances, the scope of the permission is also extended to actually private grounds, e.g. to publicly accessible private parks and castles without entrance control, however with the restriction that the owner may then demand a fee for commercial use of the images.[21]"

Not to take wikipedia as the end but it seems to specifically say that these types of images can be limited in Germany if they were taken on private property.  My guess is that IS was threatened with a lawsuit and that is why they took down the images.

« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2012, 12:15 »
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Did they mention if it was allowed for editorial use?

Yes, holgs.


« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2012, 16:01 »
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I know for the U.K. that all properties of the National Trust are forbidden stuff.  So I took all my images of Lacock Abbey (Harry Potter location) off all sites.

PhotoDuneMicrostock Insider

 

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