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Author Topic: How to start selling videos?  (Read 2900 times)

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« on: August 06, 2018, 06:34 »
0
I want to start selling the videos on Shutterstock.
But it seems to me that my GoPro Hero + is too bad for such tasks.
What action camera can you recommend?


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  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2018, 11:00 »
+1
If you're aiming to sell stock then I wouldn't recommend any action camera... unless the majority of your content will be underwater or mounted to something. I.e. specifically action camera type shots.

Nothing wrong with buying an action cam in addition to your main stock camera though.

In that case, go for the best Go Pro you can afford, or some other proven brand with comparable specs. I've never been that keen on the 4K picture quality from small sensor cameras (including my Go Pro 5 Black), when viewed at 100% everything looks a bit 'muddy' for want of a better word. But if you shoot in 4K and downscale to HD everything should look nice and crisp. Shoot in Linear when possible, using flat colour, and in the day... they're not the best in low light.

« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2018, 11:41 »
0
If you're aiming to sell stock then I wouldn't recommend any action camera... unless the majority of your content will be underwater or mounted to something. I.e. specifically action camera type shots.

Nothing wrong with buying an action cam in addition to your main stock camera though.

In that case, go for the best Go Pro you can afford, or some other proven brand with comparable specs. I've never been that keen on the 4K picture quality from small sensor cameras (including my Go Pro 5 Black), when viewed at 100% everything looks a bit 'muddy' for want of a better word. But if you shoot in 4K and downscale to HD everything should look nice and crisp. Shoot in Linear when possible, using flat colour, and in the day... they're not the best in low light.
I agree with above.
Action camera are, well, for action. Very specific cameras, they allows shot almost impossible with other camera, but anything farther than 10 meters they fall apart.
Video is a very competitive market and to do stand out a lot of expensive gear is needed

« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2018, 21:48 »
0
If you want to take a movie, decide which image you want to shoot.
When shooting landscapes, you only need the latest DSLRs, monocular lenses and a tripod.
However, to shoot TimeLabs, you must purchase TimeLabs shooting equipment.
We recommend using business images rather than common scenes.

« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2018, 10:46 »
0
I've seen people using pro gear like the RED series for stock. So a gopro might not cut it

« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2018, 11:00 »
+1
I've seen people using pro gear like the RED series for stock. So a gopro might not cut it

Try strapping a RED to your head when you go mountain biking.

« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2018, 11:33 »
+1
I've seen people using pro gear like the RED series for stock. So a gopro might not cut it

Try strapping a RED to your head when you go mountain biking.
Wont that hurt your neck?

« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2018, 14:47 »
0
I've seen people using pro gear like the RED series for stock. So a gopro might not cut it
I would think twice about buying a Red just to start in stock footage...

« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2018, 14:50 »
+1
I've seen people using pro gear like the RED series for stock. So a gopro might not cut it
I would think twice about buying a Red just to start in stock footage...

I would dare any professional to correctly tell apart 20 GH5 (good light) clips from RED footage.

nobody

« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2018, 15:41 »
+4
for $1.50 a video why buy high end equipment! Use a cell phone...

« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2018, 18:10 »
+4
for $1.50 a video why buy high end equipment! Use a cell phone...

Agree.  I'm still shooting with a GH4, but among my highest selling clips are from a Go-Pro Black 3 and my iPhone.  It's about knowing how to get the best from each of these (lighting, stability, composition, subject).  While I have shot video with my D850, the GH4 is far superior in quality. I haven't looked at the GH5 yet but the sharpness alone with the GH4 is amazing.  Anywho, for the OP, don't let anyone tell you that you need a RED to shoot stock in microstock.  You don't.

« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2018, 00:26 »
+1
Agree.  I'm still shooting with a GH4, but among my highest selling clips are from a Go-Pro Black 3 and my iPhone.  It's about knowing how to get the best from each of these (lighting, stability, composition, subject).  While I have shot video with my D850, the GH4 is far superior in quality. I haven't looked at the GH5 yet but the sharpness alone with the GH4 is amazing.  Anywho, for the OP, don't let anyone tell you that you need a RED to shoot stock in microstock.  You don't.

I have both the GH5 and the GH4 (now as B-cam), and they are a joy to use (in good light).

While the GH4 is quite incredible, the GH5 is life changing! I can now film at an 800 mm FOV HANDHELD thanks to amazing image stabilization and 4k 60p. This is almost unthinkable.

The types of shots you are able to get when you are not forced to adjust a tripod blows my mind. I film lots of wildlife so being able to be ready for action within a second, and to get it in 4k slow motion is incredible.

The 180 fps slow motion is also useful, and although the quality is a lot lower than 4k 60p, it is quite a bit better than the 96 fps in the GH4, so now I find myself actually using it more and more. Again, in good light only of course, as noise is greatly amplified when using this setting.

While I still use my full-frame camera for stills, I find that the GH5 RAW files are actually quite good, to the point where I leave the 5D mk III at home more and more. Another step up from the GH4.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 00:30 by increasingdifficulty »

« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2018, 03:41 »
0
Agree.  I'm still shooting with a GH4, but among my highest selling clips are from a Go-Pro Black 3 and my iPhone.  It's about knowing how to get the best from each of these (lighting, stability, composition, subject).  While I have shot video with my D850, the GH4 is far superior in quality. I haven't looked at the GH5 yet but the sharpness alone with the GH4 is amazing.  Anywho, for the OP, don't let anyone tell you that you need a RED to shoot stock in microstock.  You don't.

I have both the GH5 and the GH4 (now as B-cam), and they are a joy to use (in good light).

While the GH4 is quite incredible, the GH5 is life changing! I can now film at an 800 mm FOV HANDHELD thanks to amazing image stabilization and 4k 60p. This is almost unthinkable.

The types of shots you are able to get when you are not forced to adjust a tripod blows my mind. I film lots of wildlife so being able to be ready for action within a second, and to get it in 4k slow motion is incredible.

The 180 fps slow motion is also useful, and although the quality is a lot lower than 4k 60p, it is quite a bit better than the 96 fps in the GH4, so now I find myself actually using it more and more. Again, in good light only of course, as noise is greatly amplified when using this setting.

While I still use my full-frame camera for stills, I find that the GH5 RAW files are actually quite good, to the point where I leave the 5D mk III at home more and more. Another step up from the GH4.
Very interesting.
I have a GH4 (besides the D850) and I found it excellent for video, but quite poor for still images.
Lately I have been doing mostly time lapses and drone footage, but if I were to go back doing plenty of footage, I would certainly get the GH5

« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2018, 05:24 »
0
you can sell plenty of stock with a Gopro, but you have to have originality and know what your doing. Gopro obviously lends itself to certain types of shots only. For general shots where a decent camera can be used they are useless. I would say cheap action cameras and anything older the a Hero 4 are not worth using. You need to use the latest specs to your advantage.

« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2018, 06:33 »
0
for $1.50 a video why buy high end equipment! Use a cell phone...

Agree.  I'm still shooting with a GH4, but among my highest selling clips are from a Go-Pro Black 3 and my iPhone.  It's about knowing how to get the best from each of these (lighting, stability, composition, subject).  While I have shot video with my D850, the GH4 is far superior in quality. I haven't looked at the GH5 yet but the sharpness alone with the GH4 is amazing.  Anywho, for the OP, don't let anyone tell you that you need a RED to shoot stock in microstock.  You don't.
Hi Mantis,
so, you got yourself a D850?
Would you mind sharing some impressions?

« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2018, 09:27 »
0
for $1.50 a video why buy high end equipment! Use a cell phone...

Agree.  I'm still shooting with a GH4, but among my highest selling clips are from a Go-Pro Black 3 and my iPhone.  It's about knowing how to get the best from each of these (lighting, stability, composition, subject).  While I have shot video with my D850, the GH4 is far superior in quality. I haven't looked at the GH5 yet but the sharpness alone with the GH4 is amazing.  Anywho, for the OP, don't let anyone tell you that you need a RED to shoot stock in microstock.  You don't.
Hi Mantis,
so, you got yourself a D850?
Would you mind sharing some impressions?

Sure.  First and foremost, I did not purchase it for Microstock.  I am thinking of putting it underwater but wanted to get the feel for the things I wanted in it.  It really was a choice between the Sony ARIII and the D850 as I was looking for less low light noise.  Underwater, there is generally a lot that evolves into shadow or low light with primary subject being strobe lit.  When you push shadows, of course you create noise.  Using PS or LR sliders can be very helpful with a well lit image but not so much for images with a lot of shadow or dark areas.  I try to expose slightly higher when shooting and essentially drag down the exposure to accommodate better control of the shadow areas.  Because at the time Sony had that anti-noise filter built into their software with no way to turn it off the images at high ISO were horrible. No detail. Then they introduced a lesser destructive version but still, they did not allow user ability to turn it on and off.  Prior to this software, the noise level at 3200 ISO on the ARII was incredibly low.  I mean, almost mind blowingly low.  So why they added that filer to the ARIII is beyond me.  So I went with the D850.

I am still getting used to the movement of the ISO button but can live with that. The noise levels, to me, is not that impressive when compared to my D810 when shot higher than ISO 800.  At 3200 ISO when shooting astro the images looks very much like the D810, only slightly better. So, to the underwater need, I think the ISO will be far superior than what I am shooting with now since I rarely shoot over 400 ISO underwater.  So with respect to ISO, the camera has good ISO performance where I need it to be and I can push shadows a bit more with the D850.  Just not a lot. 

The FN2 button on the back is useless. It only allows you to set star ratings of an image.  I love the tilt screen and touch zoom. Very helpful when you are in confining shooting situations.  Silent shooting when doing time lapse is nice, too.  The D850 gives nice, sharp images and the joystick seems useful to me to change focus points. Although it is basically not usable if you have the tilt screen pulled out. It simply interferes with the use of the joystick.  You can customize it, too, making it a one-touch feature. If you hand hold it, the Dial pad is a bit out of position for me and not as easy or ergonomic as previous designs, but still usable.  The joystick is much easier to change focus points without having to move your hand.

« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2018, 14:49 »
0
Very interesting.
I have a GH4 (besides the D850) and I found it excellent for video, but quite poor for still images.
Lately I have been doing mostly time lapses and drone footage, but if I were to go back doing plenty of footage, I would certainly get the GH5

Yes, the GH5 won't compete with your D850 of course when it comes to stills, but I find it to be a lot better than the GH4. The extra resolution helps too, not to mention the incredible image stabilization, especially with the Leica lenses. That means you can use low ISO much more often and keep the image quality in handheld situations.

With the GH4 I found that I always needed really short shutter speeds, which means high ISO unless it's a slow landscape image. Now I can get away with ISO 100 on the GH5 when I needed ISO 1600 or ISO 3200 on the GH4, because I can lower the shutter speed and still get tack sharp images! Big difference. And there is no anti-aliasing filter which further improves the details compared to the GH4. Of course slower shutter speeds don't always work with wildlife and doesn't matter on a tripod with lots of time, but on many subjects you can raise the image quality thanks to the stabilization.

But I am absolutely blown away by the image quality when filming with the GH5. Exposed right with the right settings and I could send it straight to BBC.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 14:52 by increasingdifficulty »


 

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