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Author Topic: New guide for beginners - "Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock Photography"  (Read 9718 times)

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Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« on: June 04, 2017, 12:13 »
+2

Hey all,

As some of you may already be aware, since November last year, I've been painstakingly drafting a comprehensive guide to Microstock.

It's taken a hell of a lot of work and I've settled on close to a whopping 200 pages, with just as many example images, to reflect the complexity of the business.

Here's the table of contents:

Chapter 1 Microstock Photography 101 
Chapter 2 - What's in my Camera Bag?
Chapter 3 Achieving Technical Excellence 
Chapter 4 - The Legal Side of Stock Photography
Chapter 5 - Licensing Editorial & Commercial Images
Chapter 6 - Overview on Agencies to License Images
Chapter 7 - How Much Can You Expect to Earn (The Extra Mile Isnt Crowded)?
Chapter 8 - Creating Interesting Images
Chapter 9 - Finding your Niche
Chapter 10 - Keywording 
Chapter 11 Workflow Optimisation
Chapter 12 - Getting the H*ll Out of Microstock! 
Interview with Joas Souza, London-based Architectural photographer

 
But it's not about quantity, it's about quality.

I'm really sticking my neck out on this one and telling it how it is (the good, the bad and the ugly).

To get this ball going, once published soon, I'm going to GIVING AWAY THE GUIDE to 5 people. All you have to do is go to my word press blog (link is at my signature) and underneath its latest post (with the same title), put down your email address. Thereafter, all I ASK is that you give me your brutally honest opinion of the book, either here or on the blog! I won't feel offended if you hate it (which you won't).

Not to worry if you're too late, once published, it will be for sale for $5.00 for a limited time only, thereafter $10.00. 

Happy shooting!

Alex
https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/new-guide-for-beginners-brutally-honest-guide-to-microstock-photography/


« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2017, 12:24 »
+5
The last chapter of the guide does not inspire to pay 10 bucks for it.

« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2017, 15:26 »
+6
Hem... "Microstock"?!!?!... Aaaah yes, I remember now!!!  ;D

« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2017, 15:29 »
+11
Microstock is over. I've heard that knitting is the next big thing...

I am looking for a brutally honest guide to something that is sustainable in the long run...

« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2017, 17:18 »
+7
oh no, not another one.

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2017, 21:24 »
+1
May I ask what year you started doing micro?

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2017, 02:43 »
+1
Quote
The last chapter of the guide does not inspire to pay 10 bucks for it.

This is not a get-rich-quick guide and even the thought of making Microstock sound like an appealing business model (for the vast majority of contributors), makes me want to puke. So, this chapter is basically an exercise in 'thinking outside of the (Microstock) box' to brainstorm sustainable alternatives (perhaps knitting :) ) using the skills gained by participating in the Microstock market. 

Quote
May I ask what year you started doing micro?

I started in 2009 but quickly lost interest and only seriously since 2012. My early work was crap, though.



« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2017, 03:44 »
+15
I would only buy a guide form someone who has made a massive success of microstock, and anyone who has made a massive success off it isn't going to write a guide.

« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2017, 03:58 »
0
I've got a couple by people who were pretty succesful I think -- Rob Slyvan "taking stock" and Doug Freer  They were useful to me at the time but a lot of content probably quite dated now.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2017, 05:36 »
+1
I should whip one up... "The Brutally Honest Guide to Space-Related Microstock Motion Graphics". I still need to write my other book though... "The Holy Grail: Perfect Crispy Crackling Every Time, and Other Adventures in Pork".

Or I could combine them, two great topics in one book. Could be a game changer.

Chapter 1 Intro to space stuff
Chapter 2 - Buying the right meat.
Chapter 3 Scientific accuracy in you animations
Chapter 4 - Preparing the rind
Interview with award winning butcher Kev Meatstation and vfx artist Wayne McBadger.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2017, 05:58 »
0
Quote
I should whip one up... "The Brutally Honest Guide to Space-Related Microstock Motion Graphics".

Let's collaborate  :D ;)

« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2017, 06:50 »
+2
Quote
The last chapter of the guide does not inspire to pay 10 bucks for it.

This is not a get-rich-quick guide and even the thought of making Microstock sound like an appealing business model (for the vast majority of contributors), makes me want to puke. So, this chapter is basically an exercise in 'thinking outside of the (Microstock) box' to brainstorm sustainable alternatives (perhaps knitting :) ) using the skills gained by participating in the Microstock market. 


I understand, but why anyone would pay money for a recipe for inaction? I don't have to pay to learn to do nothing. I can do nothing all by myself, without a guru's advice. If I make an effort it is because I want something good out of it.

If you did not succeed in this particular venue, that's fine, it's life, but do you think trying to sell a book on "how to fail to be an actor, scientist, plumber, international spy etc" will work? Do you see many of those around? Perhaps people would like to read about a unique expertise rather than trying to start something they cannot finish because they only learn that they will fail?

« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2017, 07:24 »
0
I should whip one up... "The Brutally Honest Guide to Space-Related Microstock Motion Graphics". I still need to write my other book though... "The Holy Grail: Perfect Crispy Crackling Every Time, and Other Adventures in Pork".

Or I could combine them, two great topics in one book. Could be a game changer.

Chapter 1 Intro to space stuff
Chapter 2 - Buying the right meat.
Chapter 3 Scientific accuracy in you animations
Chapter 4 - Preparing the rind
Interview with award winning butcher Kev Meatstation and vfx artist Wayne McBadger.

I'd buy chapter 2 for 10 bucks  8)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2017, 07:26 »
0
Quote
I understand, but why anyone would pay money for a recipe for inaction? I don't have to pay to learn to do nothing. I can do nothing all by myself, without a guru's advice. If I make an effort it is because I want something good out of it.

If you did not succeed in this particular venue, that's fine, it's life, but do you think trying to sell a book on "how to fail to be an actor, scientist, plumber, international spy etc" will work? Do you see many of those around? Perhaps people would like to read about a unique expertise rather than trying to start something they cannot finish because they only learn that they will fail?

You make some valid points. I've certainly approached drafting this guide in a rather unconventional way, but in a thought-provoking and accurate manner, nevertheless. So much so that we're having an interesting discussion on what it means to "fail" or "succeed". 

If the aim is to be "brutally honest", I cannot sugarcoat, how easy it would be to make money from Microstock to try to get more book-sales, because everybody here knows how tough this industry is - it would be a "brutally dishonest guide" and i'm sure there's many of those out there.

I don't know whether i'm "failing" or "succeeding" at this game but all I know is that I quite enjoy it and would like to pass on my knowledge to others. I'm by no means a guru, just a travel photojournalist. In any case, I don't believe in "failure", as in life we must learn from our mistakes and try to improve with every minute. It's more like feedback than anything. To receive these feedback to improve, we must try try try try and try - the opposite of inaction. Oh and try some more. 
 
I don't want to give too much away as I'm hoping enough people will want to read it but here's the opening paragraph from Chapter 12 "Getting . Out of Microstock":

It may seem strange in a comprehensive guide to how to be successful at Microstock to end with a chapter on how to get . out of it, but please hear me out! This chapter is aimed at both those more experienced contributors and those just starting out, since both will face similar dilemmas, as I will outline in this chapter.I started in Microstock because my perception at the time was that it was the most practical and low-cost way to monetise my images. During the past four years, I have painstakingly put in the time and effort to keep learning how to make my images stand out from the herd. My experience of submitting to various Agencies has given me an education in the technical and commercial/editorial aspects of photography simply by participating in those markets....


« Last Edit: June 05, 2017, 07:30 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2017, 07:49 »
0
I agree with you in that success/failure is just a silhouette. If it looks like a duck, it could still be a pair of hands and a table lamp :).

Perhaps it's a matter of presentation. Instead of getting-out-of-stock pessimistic conclusion, put it as a first chapter. Entitle it something like "If it were easy, everyone would do it". Well, English is not my first language, I am not good with catchy slogans, I am sure you can come up with something better.

Or use another angle. Say, first steps in industry, learning it while getting stuff sold.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2017, 07:53 by niktol »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2017, 08:19 »
0
Quote
I agree with you in that success/failure is just a silhouette. If it looks like a duck, it could still be a pair of hands and a table lamp :).

Perhaps it's a matter of presentation. Instead of getting-out-of-stock pessimistic conclusion, put it as a first chapter. Entitle it something like "If it were easy, everyone would do it". Well, English is not my first language, I am not good with catchy slogans, I am sure you can come up with something better.

Or use another angle. Say, first steps in industry, learning it while getting stuff sold.

Thanks for your suggestion. I wanted to be shocking, but you're right that it may also put people off.

English isn't my first language either, that's why I'm a Brasilnut :)

« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2017, 14:09 »
+7
Brutally honest? Ok...

Your shutterstock portfolio is 95% walk-around, point-and-shoot, editorial shots. No working with models. No studio table top. (strobes?) No concepts. Pretty much vacation snaps of cities. And some architectural interiors with verticals off. (?)

Kinda a narrow (and easy) niche.

This makes me question your knowledge and experience that would qualify you to write a guide to Microstock photography.

But  anyone who helps dissuade more competition in this industry is fine with me. ;)



Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #17 on: June 06, 2017, 14:28 »
0
Quote
Brutally honest? Ok...

Your shutterstock portfolio is 95% walk-around, point-and-shoot, editorial shots. No working with models. No studio table top. (strobes?) No concepts. Pretty much vacation snaps of cities. And some architectural interiors with verticals off. (?)

Kinda a narrow (and easy) niche.

This makes me question your knowledge and experience that would qualify you to write a guide to Microstock photography.

But  anyone who helps dissuade more competition in this industry is fine with me. ;)

I appreciate your brutally honest feedback. 

I stick to travel & news editorial as my main niches - I can't possibly cover all niches within Microstock or claim to be proficient at still life, for example.

We were tired of living in a world that revolved around fixing our weaknesses. Societys relentless focus on peoples shortcomings had turned into a global obsession. Whats more, we had discovered that people have several times more potential for growth when they invest energy in developing their strengths instead of correcting their deficiencies. - Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath 

On a side note, I've stopped submitting my premium images to SS about a year ago, they now go to Midstock agencies as RM where they should be. So you're probably only seeing my leftover work there at SS earning me those 33cents here and there but I did get a $14 extended license download today. For a better idea of my premium work I recommend to check out my Robert Harding collection - https://www.robertharding.com/photographers/alexandrerotenberg/. 

Anyway, it's all explained in the book, hope you will check it out soon :)

« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 14:31 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #18 on: June 06, 2017, 14:59 »
0
recommend to check out my Robert Harding collection - https://www.robertharding.com/photographers/alexandrerotenberg/. 

Do you sell anything there? Better than Shutterstock?

« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2017, 15:07 »
0
Quote
Brutally honest? Ok...

Your shutterstock portfolio is 95% walk-around, point-and-shoot, editorial shots. No working with models. No studio table top. (strobes?) No concepts. Pretty much vacation snaps of cities. And some architectural interiors with verticals off. (?)

Kinda a narrow (and easy) niche.

This makes me question your knowledge and experience that would qualify you to write a guide to Microstock photography.

But  anyone who helps dissuade more competition in this industry is fine with me. ;)

I appreciate your brutally honest feedback. 

I stick to travel & news editorial as my main niches - I can't possibly cover all niches within Microstock or claim to be proficient at still life, for example.

We were tired of living in a world that revolved around fixing our weaknesses. Societys relentless focus on peoples shortcomings had turned into a global obsession. Whats more, we had discovered that people have several times more potential for growth when they invest energy in developing their strengths instead of correcting their deficiencies. - Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath 

On a side note, I've stopped submitting my premium images to SS about a year ago, they now go to Midstock agencies as RM where they should be. So you're probably only seeing my leftover work there at SS earning me those 33cents here and there but I did get a $14 extended license download today. For a better idea of my premium work I recommend to check out my Robert Harding collection - https://www.robertharding.com/photographers/alexandrerotenberg/. 

Anyway, it's all explained in the book, hope you will check it out soon :)

Brutally. I dont see a big diff between your premium or your stock...in my opinion premium should be something uncommon, superb, you cant find in rf,unique lighting or subject. Really what shot in premium agency you have can have any of this quality?

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2017, 15:33 »
0
Quote
Do you sell anything there? Better than Shutterstock?

I'm still building my portfolio there with just over 100 images so it's early days. They are extremely picky on what they choose. Commission is 35% and commercial licenses go for a minimum of EUR290. Editorials minimum EUR70.

Quote
Brutally. I dont see a big diff between your premium or your stock...in my opinion premium should be something uncommon, superb, you cant find in rf,unique lighting or subject. Really what shot in premium agency you have can have any of this quality?

It's good you guys have such high standards as it helps me to push for better and better.
I agree on your definition of "premium". I used the term loosely earlier and admit that I have only a few that I consider to fall under this stringent standard, although always striving to create more. I'll paste them here (are they premium, yes or no?).



 


« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 15:41 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2017, 15:43 »
+1
Quote
Do you sell anything there? Better than Shutterstock?

I'm still building my portfolio there with just over 100 images so it's early days. They are extremely picky on what they choose. Commission is 35% and commercial licenses go for a minimum of EUR290. Editorials minimum EUR70.

Quote
Brutally. I dont see a big diff between your premium or your stock...in my opinion premium should be something uncommon, superb, you cant find in rf,unique lighting or subject. Really what shot in premium agency you have can have any of this quality?

It's good you guys have such high standards as it helps me to push for better and better.
I agree on your definition of "premium". I used the term loosely earlier and admit that I have only a few that I consider to fall under this stringent standard, although always striving to create more. I'll paste them here (are they premium, yes or no?).

they good but premium?
i don't know they are very good images, but the 3 have something different, the last is not bad, the rest for me not .

« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2017, 15:52 »
0
Quote
Do you sell anything there? Better than Shutterstock?

I'm still building my portfolio there with just over 100 images so it's early days. They are extremely picky on what they choose. Commission is 35% and commercial licenses go for a minimum of EUR290. Editorials minimum EUR70.

Quote
Brutally. I dont see a big diff between your premium or your stock...in my opinion premium should be something uncommon, superb, you cant find in rf,unique lighting or subject. Really what shot in premium agency you have can have any of this quality?

It's good you guys have such high standards as it helps me to push for better and better.
I agree on your definition of "premium". I used the term loosely earlier and admit that I have only a few that I consider to fall under this stringent standard, although always striving to create more. I'll paste them here (are they premium, yes or no?).

2 3 5 are good the rest  in my opinion is too editorial oriented...robert harding is more oriented towards pure travel, was once a reference for travel guide cover for example, another interesting agency is simephoto with solo mango as little sister, they have base mostly of travel photography. personally i think harding is another agency with not a bright future, once i wanted to upload there but i prefer collaborate with more documentary agency. all this photo for me are good enough for rm in alamy, and am pretty sure you would sell more there that with rh, considering that rh also sell a lot in alamy, and if they sell there you got 25 %

« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2017, 15:54 »
+4
You probably have the most critical audience you will find here not many of whom are likely to be your target market. The answer to whether they are premium or not is answered if they sell or not.

« Reply #24 on: June 06, 2017, 17:38 »
+2
Sounds like a good concept, good title, I think many people would buy and read it if you can get the word out.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2017, 00:49 »
0
Quote
simephoto with solo mango as little sister, they have base mostly of travel photography. personally i think harding is another agency with not a bright future, once i wanted to upload there but i prefer collaborate with more documentary agency. all this photo for me are good enough for rm in alamy, and am pretty sure you would sell more there that with rh, considering that rh also sell a lot in alamy, and if they sell there you got 25 %

I pitched to Simephoto but in the end settled for RH, on an image-exclusive basis. I want to avoid signing up to different exclusive agencies that specialise in the same niche as that's just asking for trouble (and picking favourites), not to mention the legal issues of potentially submitting the same/similar images to both.

I like RH since the editor there (Fraser Hall) is easily approachable and gives good feedback - there's also a community feel as it's a small agency. I hope they're successful. Alamy do get a fair share of my leftover RM images and some RF editorial, then SS get the rest as RF to license for peanuts which does add up. This is a long-term strategy I'm willing to be patient for positive results...I don't have all the answers but there's a method behind the madness which I devote many many pages to outlying in the book.

The only reason why I chose the 4th image was because a similar image from a better angle went viral 6 weeks ago at an English Defense League rally in Birmingham - credit Joe Gibbens / PA (attached). I do enjoy editorials and can see myself going full steam ahead with it and perhaps one of my images may go viral (I came close that time so it just means that I was in the wrong place at the right time). I've recently signed up to Rex Features.

Quote
You probably have the most critical audience you will find here not many of whom are likely to be your target market.

This is great! I don't waste my time (anymore) posting on 500px and flicker so I get a bunch of useless praise and likes - also don't want the risk of my images being stolen. The people posting/reading on here produce top quality work and I rather receive brutally honest feedback - it doesn't hurt my ego :).

Quote
Sounds like a good concept, good title, I think many people would buy and read it if you can get the word out.

I believe so and hope it may help a lot of people who are just starting out. It may even "dissuade" some who may think it's an easy ride from even bothering to invest their money and time. I don't enjoy tooting my horn too much but it's all part of the marketing game to get the word out on what I think is a quality product but I'll let the readers be the real judges.


« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 00:57 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2017, 09:35 »
0
Once we are on the subject of being brutally honest, methinks you should be pushing your selling point more aggressively. Let's say I wanna hear a brutally honest opinion on something, which is what your book offers according to the title, but when I open the book, I see a content that sounds very vanilla. A uni textbook. And I was expecting opinions that tell me how it is. If my image content suck and it is not going to sell, I wanna know that right off the bat, it should be in the title of a chapter.

Brasilnut, when you write you sound like a very nice guy. Brutally honest people aren't.


Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2017, 10:06 »
0
Quote
Brasilnut, when you write you sound like a very nice guy. Brutally honest people aren't.

haha, let's just say that in the book i'm very angry at most of the agencies for the way they treat most contributors! And there's parts that I make it clear that most newbies "won't make it and not to even bother". :D
« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 10:14 by Brasilnut »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #28 on: June 07, 2017, 10:31 »
+3
Quote
Let's say I wanna hear a brutally honest opinion on something, which is what your book offers according to the title, but when I open the book, I see a content that sounds very vanilla. A uni textbook. And I was expecting opinions that tell me how it is.

Here's my revised table of Contents:
Chapter 1 - Why you should move to Thailand
Chapter 2 - What's in my camera bag before the gypsies stole it?
Chapter 3 - Technicals - what's the point, they're going to reject you anyway
Chapter 4 - How not to get * sued
Chapter 5 - RM or RF, why doesn't it matter when you're still getting paid crap
Chapter 6 - Overview of Agencies (most of these won't be around in a year)
Chapter 7 - How much can you expect to earn (less than working at McDonald's)
Chapter 8 - Don't fking shoot flowers, pets and flags
Chapter 9 - Finding Nietzsche
Chapter 10 - Keywording or as some people call it "Copy-Pasting"
Chapter 11 - Hiring cheap labour in India for cheap
Chapter 12 - The Agencies are the devil and their customers don't care about you
Interview with Playboy bunny of the year 2017
« Last Edit: June 07, 2017, 10:34 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #29 on: June 07, 2017, 10:32 »
0
Quote
Brasilnut, when you write you sound like a very nice guy. Brutally honest people aren't.

haha, let's just say that in the book i'm very angry at most of the agencies for the way they treat most contributors! And there's parts that I make it clear that most newbies "won't make it and not to even bother". :D

Do you think it's the right angle to write a book that you want (I presume) to sell? Are you helping the newbies or just venting?

If you ask my opinion, I don't see anything horrible about the way agencies "treat" contributors. Noone is twisting anyone's arm, being a contributor is not an addiction. If I had the competence to start an agency and make it successful, I would do what market dictates, not what contributors like.

« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2017, 10:34 »
+1
Quote
Let's say I wanna hear a brutally honest opinion on something, which is what your book offers according to the title, but when I open the book, I see a content that sounds very vanilla. A uni textbook. And I was expecting opinions that tell me how it is.

Here's my revised table of Contents:
Chapter 1 - what is Microstock
Chapter 2 - What's in my camera bag before the gypsies stole it?
Chapter 3 - Technicals - what's the point, they're going to reject you anyway
Chapter 4 - How not to get * sued
Chapter 5 - RM or RF, why doesn't it matter when you're still getting paid crap
Chapter 6 - Overview of Agencies (most of these won't be around in a year)
Chapter 7 - How much can you expect to earn (less than working at McDonald's)
Chapter 8 - Don't fking shoot flowers, pets and flags
Chapter 9 - Finding Nietzsche
Chapter 10 - Keywording or as some people call it "Copy-Pasting"
Chapter 11 - Hiring cheap labour in India for cheap
Chapter 12 - The Agencies are the devil and their customers don't care about you
Interview with Playboy bunny of the year 2017

hahaha, now you sound like you mean it

« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2017, 14:30 »
+4
I quit doing microstock. Now I'm gathering material for my own book, "The Hope-Crushing Guide to POD Sales".


« Reply #32 on: June 07, 2017, 15:20 »
0
Quote
Do you sell anything there? Better than Shutterstock?

I'm still building my portfolio there with just over 100 images so it's early days. They are extremely picky on what they choose. Commission is 35% and commercial licenses go for a minimum of EUR290. Editorials minimum EUR70.

So, no?

Just trying to evaluate if it's worth any time.

After all, 0 times a million is still 0.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #33 on: June 07, 2017, 17:07 »
0
Quote
So, no?

Just trying to evaluate if it's worth any time.

After all, 0 times a million is still 0.


« Reply #34 on: June 07, 2017, 19:37 »
0
I hope your book sells to the newbies. Good on you for giving it a go.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2017, 08:47 »
0
Quote
I hope your book sells to the newbies. Good on you for giving it a go.

Grazie mille  8)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #36 on: June 09, 2017, 17:16 »
0
Wohooo book is published!  8) :D Oh happy days!

PM if you would like to purchase a $5 copy or click on my blog link below for details.

« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 17:26 by Brasilnut »


« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2017, 19:22 »
+1
Here's my revised table of Contents:
Chapter 1 - Why you should move to Thailand
Chapter 2 - What's in my camera bag before the gypsies stole it?
Chapter 3 - Technicals - what's the point, they're going to reject you anyway
Chapter 4 - How not to get * sued
Chapter 5 - RM or RF, why doesn't it matter when you're still getting paid crap
Chapter 6 - Overview of Agencies (most of these won't be around in a year)
Chapter 7 - How much can you expect to earn (less than working at McDonald's)
Chapter 8 - Don't fking shoot flowers, pets and flags
Chapter 9 - Finding Nietzsche
Chapter 10 - Keywording or as some people call it "Copy-Pasting"
Chapter 11 - Hiring cheap labour in India for cheap
Chapter 12 - The Agencies are the devil and their customers don't care about you
Interview with Playboy bunny of the year 2017

You missed your calling - you should have been a comedian!

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #38 on: June 10, 2017, 10:31 »
+2
Quote
You missed your calling - you should have been a comedian!

After my last payout from SS, I lost my sense of humour  :o

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #39 on: June 11, 2017, 08:14 »
0
Word up. Is it just me or is there only the front cover of the book to download in the download section? Not actually seeing the book itself anywhere.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2017, 10:33 »
0
Quote
Word up. Is it just me or is there only the front cover of the book to download in the download section? Not actually seeing the book itself anywhere.

Wow I completely misread that the first time.

It's on sale for $5 (limited-time offer), although I did give some key information away for free :) See my blog post at:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/new-guide-for-beginners-brutally-honest-guide-to-microstock-photography/

« Last Edit: June 11, 2017, 10:46 by Brasilnut »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #41 on: June 12, 2017, 17:33 »
0
Here's some independent reviews so far from experienced stock contributors on the Guide:

Quote
A good read especially for the newbies! Great work on writing a tech subject to reach a general audience.
The last chapter [Opportunities Outside of Microstock] is a wake-up call for the dreamers but a known for the veterans. We accept this challenge and learn to up our game to keep our income level the same or end higher.
Tom Baker, the stay at home shooter since he shoots 90% of his images at home in his studio, a great way to keep costs down!

Quote
You provided a diverse view of the entire stock photo industry at large; including the macro/premium agents. For newcomers, I believe that it will be very helpful for them to know that there is indeed another side to the sales processes. The book is assistive to any stock photographer looking to gain valuable information and additional thought processing and skills.
Shannon Fagan, award winning assignment and stock photographer for clients such as Intel, BMW, Time, Fortune and New Yorker

Quote
Its full of great information, and no false-promises. Microstock is a tough business nowadays, but youve covered a lot of what newcomers will need to know, and a few harsh-realities experienced photographers would do well to listen to.
Robert Davies, programmer, stock photographer and developer of picNiche and picWorkflow

« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2017, 12:33 »
+1
Hello All,
Read this book in 3 days.
Spoiler alert: It is in fact very useful book for us who are thinking about stock photos, and photography in general.

The first part are the confirmation what a seasoned photographer already know but a newbie needs absolutely to read.

The second part is more stock related, honest opinions about agencies, business and clients its all we need to know to have "success" in this kind of work.

I love the case study that the book presents, it is a truly and honestly example of what we can earn in this of business.

I also like all the tips and tricks that come in every section of the book.

Thank you Alexandre. It is in fact a great book.

« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2017, 16:22 »
+1
Was also very impressed with this book as well, purchased a couple of days ago and have finished reading it cover-to-cover.  It immediately came across as very professionally put together and excellent visually.  Lots of great information packed into it, and I really enjoyed all of the examples and the case study.  Overall a must-read for anyone starting out, and I would imagine even a helpful resource for those that may have been doing stock for a while now.

« Reply #44 on: June 15, 2017, 05:02 »
+1
A very good book for a beginner plus advaced photographer getting into Microstock. Many very useful links to improve your photography.
Everything explained in detail. Licensing explained is such a way as to help us choose what we want.
Heartily recommend it. You will not regret.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2017, 02:35 »
0
Awesome reviews, guys  :)

On a side note, the book is now available on Amazon Kindle:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071GWJXBG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1497604673&sr=8-1&keywords=brutally+honest+guide+to+microstock

Otherwise PDF:

https://wordpress.com/post/brutallyhonestmicrostock.wordpress.com/110

Good luck with your shooting and PM for more details!

Alex
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 04:18 by Brasilnut »

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #46 on: June 16, 2017, 02:58 »
+3
You keep mentioning microstock as being part of the 'gig economy', but it's not. If microstock sites were places where potential buyers posted their requirements for an image, and then photographers went out and created their perfect image in exchange for payment... then that would be considered part of the gig economy, but obviously it doesn't work that way.

Although it's licensing rather than buying, microstock would be closer to just 'selling products online' than it would to being 'gigs'.

 


Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #47 on: June 16, 2017, 03:25 »
0
Quote
If microstock sites were places where potential buyers posted their requirements for an image, and then photographers went out and created their perfect image in exchange for payment

Image request sites, such as Snapwire and Imagebrief, have emerged to cater for clients' specific needs, although as you correctly mentioned, there's no direct interaction between Photographer and Licensee (agencies act as intermediaries).

Quote
Although it's licensing rather than buying, microstock would be closer to just 'selling products online' than it would to being 'gigs'.

I won't get too bogged down on the definition between a 'gig job' and 'selling products online', it's far too academic. I try to look it from a wider and practical perspective.

My argument is that being a microstock photographer contributor is part of an overall trend towards more flexible self-employed (gig) jobs - just need to look at airbnb, uber, amazon. We're already seeing workers in advanced economies losing their comfortable jobs due to technological automation and off sourcing (i hired a designer in India for much cheaper and great service). The next big push will be even more drastic, for example, driveless vehicles and drone deliveries. What's going to happen to those bus & taxi drivers and postmen - if they don't retrain they will be left behind.

These disruptions are likely to create more division in advanced societies, with more inequality as those left behind struggle to find other suitable work. Govts will be forced by the angry population and businesses to increase trade barriers and the 90s / 2000s globalization wave will slow down. We are seeing just the start of this paradigm shift, with a rise in populism in some countries (Brexit, Trump, anti-immigration).

« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 06:26 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #48 on: June 16, 2017, 06:36 »
+1
Other important relevant trends not to overlook is removing guild barriers and professional gateways,  decentralization of knowledge sharing in professions.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #49 on: June 16, 2017, 08:50 »
0

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #50 on: June 16, 2017, 16:34 »
0
I just published a list of my top 5 best selling photos at Shutterstock :)

http://wp.me/p8yHUo-fz

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #51 on: June 16, 2017, 16:58 »
+1
Great shots and interesting to hear about why they are successful!

Steve

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #52 on: June 17, 2017, 01:54 »
0
Quote
Great shots and interesting to hear about why they are successful!

Thanks Steve :) It's a good lesson for newbies to focus on which types of premium images tend to do well and simply produce more of them.

I don't know if it's the same with your portfolio but those 5 images alone (and similars) make up something like half of my revenue at SS.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #53 on: June 17, 2017, 10:35 »
+2
My best seller is a cat. $2560 on Shutterstock and just $2.91 on BigStock. Go figure...

The power of getting onto the first page in the search results I guess.


Steve

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #54 on: June 17, 2017, 10:51 »
0
I do like a good cat.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #55 on: June 17, 2017, 11:20 »
0
Especially a good earning cat...

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #56 on: June 17, 2017, 11:28 »
+1
Oh looks like he's got a friend now...

http://www.dinamys-sas.com/a55_rium%C3%AC.html


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #57 on: June 17, 2017, 12:02 »
+1
I do like a dog as well. Probably a bit more than cats.

« Reply #58 on: June 17, 2017, 15:13 »
0
Cats are much better than dogs :D

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #59 on: June 18, 2017, 17:44 »
0

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #60 on: June 18, 2017, 20:55 »
0
Short article on why images with people tend to sell better:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.wordpress.com/2017/06/18/why-images-with-people-tend-to-sell-better/

In your pics of the cropped people making rugs, didn't the rugs need property releases? I'd have expected the first pic also to require a MR, because of the recogniseable hoodie.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2017, 01:32 »
0
Quote
In your pics of the cropped people making rugs, didn't the rugs need property releases? I'd have expected the first pic also to require a MR, because of the recogniseable hoodie.

Fortunately, the reviewer didn't have any issues and those two images were accepted commercially. However, from time to time similar commercial submissions are rejected for lack of a MR/PR. Then have to think about whether it may be submitted as an editorial and if not, just move on.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 02:45 by Brasilnut »

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #62 on: June 19, 2017, 02:35 »
0
Quote
In your pics of the cropped people making rugs, didn't the rugs need property releases? I'd have expected the first pic also to require a MR, because of the recogniseable hoodie.

Fortunately, the reviewer didn't have any issues and those two images were accepted commercially. However, from time to time similar commercial submissions are rejected for lack of a MR. Then have to think about whether it may be submitted as an editorial and if not, just move on.

It would never have occurred to me that the rugs wouldn't need PRs.  ::)

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #63 on: June 19, 2017, 09:22 »
0
The crazy thing with all this is that everything around us has been designed by someone and so they own the rights to it. All the agencies are trying to do is to minimize the chance of a problem and so brands with a well known desire to control their publicity are weeded out, the artisan maker of a rug is so unlikely to complain about the use of their image that they will leave them in. Whatever the law actually says about these things is secondary to the desire of the agencies to protect themselves against the smallest risk.

Steve

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #64 on: June 19, 2017, 09:50 »
0
No, they want to protect themselves from the largest risk. For sure on Alamy I'd say 'needs PR' and 'no PR'; but as any tiny part of a person needs an MR on Alamy, for these pics lack of a PR is moot anyway.

« Reply #65 on: June 20, 2017, 03:59 »
0
Is instagram not popular anymore? Usually my friends upload their perfect pictures on Instagram and kill of the ghosts with help of newbielink:https://spamguardapp.com/dashboard [nonactive] , stocks often make lesser coins than IG, so I can't understand it.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 08:18 by Nastasiy »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #66 on: June 20, 2017, 04:19 »
0
Quote
Is instagram not popular anymore? Usually my friends upload their perfect pictures on Instagram and kill of the ghosts with help of newbielink:https://spamguardapp.com/dashboard [nonactive], stocks often make lesser coins than IG, so I can't understand it.

Yea, instagram is huge! It's more about building your professional profile and networking. There's some really talented people on there so a nice place to get some inspiration (avoid the narcissists).


Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #67 on: June 22, 2017, 08:07 »
0
Hey fellow photography grinders,

I've decided to share the love and I've put together a new offer, which lasts until the 30th of June. Thereafter, I'm off to the beach.

So here it is: Buy a copy of my book and I'll critique 5 of your stock images. I'll advise you:

- whether they have commercial value;
- how to improve them technically;
- on which agencies I would recommend to submit; and
- even which key words to use to make sure buyers find your image among the masses.

Visit my blog for more details at www.brutallyhonestmicrostock.com

Thanks

Alex
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 08:19 by Brasilnut »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #68 on: June 24, 2017, 05:09 »
+1
Anybody here have much luck with photography competitions? I'm trying for the Travel Photographer of the Year 2017: Here's my latest post:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2017/06/24/travel-photographer-of-the-year-2017-my-entry-wish-me-luck/

Good luck!

« Reply #69 on: June 24, 2017, 05:23 »
+2
Anybody here have much luck with photography competitions? I'm trying for the Travel Photographer of the Year 2017: Here's my latest post:

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2017/06/24/travel-photographer-of-the-year-2017-my-entry-wish-me-luck/

Good luck!
Read the T &Cs carefully  :o

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #70 on: June 24, 2017, 05:34 »
+1
Quote
Read the T &Cs carefully 

Good point. I've made a link of the T&Cs available on the blog post.

steheap

  • Author of best selling "Get Started in Stock"

« Reply #71 on: June 24, 2017, 09:21 »
+1
There is a great section on "selecting your images" which should give us all something to think about in terms of what makes a great photograph:
http://www.tpoty.com/awards/selecting

Steve

« Reply #72 on: June 24, 2017, 09:26 »
+1
There is a great section on "selecting your images" which should give us all something to think about in terms of what makes a great photograph:
http://www.tpoty.com/awards/selecting

Steve
Yes I might turn it into a checklist and pin it on the wall apart from "subtlety" no $$ for that on Mstock in my experience ;-)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #73 on: June 25, 2017, 15:59 »
0
Here's a quirky article I just put together from a photo shoot I did today on deciding whether images should go to Micros (RF) or Midstock (RM):

https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2017/06/25/shots-of-the-italian-alps-from-today-which-will-go-as-rf-and-which-as-rm/

Hope you enjoy!
« Last Edit: June 25, 2017, 16:14 by Brasilnut »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #74 on: June 29, 2017, 14:40 »
0
Exciting news!

Veteran stock photographer, Steve Heap and I have teamed up. We are offering both my Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock Photography and Steve's Getting Started in Stock (4th edition) for a bundle price of $10.99, a discount of almost $5 from purchasing them separately.

Our respective books complement each other nicely as I took a broader view, discussing the various agencies out there, photographic technical elements and opportunities outside of microstock using the skills gained from being a stock contributor. Steves approach was to focus less on the market and the photographic skills needed and put much more detail around the OK, so how do I do it? question, with chapters about how to work with each agency, a workflow for handling all the images, sections on keywords and keywording tips and so on.

You can purchase this bundle either on my site at: https://brutallyhonestmicrostock.com/2017/06/04/new-guide-for-beginners-brutally-honest-guide-to-microstock-photography/

Or at Steve's site: http://www.backyardsilver.com/stock_photography_ebook/

Quote
It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed - Napoleon Hill


Good luck

Alex & Steve
« Last Edit: June 29, 2017, 14:47 by Brasilnut »

« Reply #75 on: June 29, 2017, 15:32 »
+7
No offense friend, but your posts are getting a bit spammy. It's time to reign it in a bit and find other channels to market your book.

Bad Company

« Reply #76 on: June 30, 2017, 08:33 »
+3
No offense friend, but your posts are getting a bit spammy. It's time to reign it in a bit and find other channels to market your book.

He means well. His intent isn't to take our hard earned dollars. He actually listen to our suggestions which is more that I can say about the folks that own the micro-stock companies  :-[



« Reply #77 on: June 30, 2017, 09:06 »
+4
I think he has been keeping it to the one thread right? I feel that is fair. Maybe Leaf could have a section for promoting projects like this and the other guy's tutorials if it is annoying other members.

« Reply #78 on: June 30, 2017, 22:05 »
0
No offense friend, but your posts are getting a bit spammy. It's time to reign it in a bit and find other channels to market your book.

He means well. His intent isn't to take our hard earned dollars. He actually listen to our suggestions which is more that I can say about the folks that own the micro-stock companies  :-[

I know he does mean well. I should have sent him a private message instead instead of making a public post. I do a lot of these types of projects as well...not Microstock books, but other stuff. It's not easy getting it to sell, so I know where he's coming from.

« Reply #79 on: June 30, 2017, 22:30 »
0
No offense friend, but your posts are getting a bit spammy. It's time to reign it in a bit and find other channels to market your book.

He means well. His intent isn't to take our hard earned dollars. He actually listen to our suggestions which is more that I can say about the folks that own the micro-stock companies  :-[


Are they giving away the books for free? I thought they were for sale. Seems to me they are shamelessly using this forum to do exactly that.  ::)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #80 on: July 03, 2017, 04:31 »
+1
Quote
Are they giving away the books for free? I thought they were for sale. Seems to me they are shamelessly using this forum to do exactly that.  ::)

Wishing you a nice week, Cathy :)

« Reply #81 on: July 03, 2017, 04:42 »
+1
Quote
Are they giving away the books for free? I thought they were for sale. Seems to me they are shamelessly using this forum to do exactly that.  ::)

Wishing you a nice week, Cathy :)


Same to you! Happy fourth of July!  :)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #82 on: July 03, 2017, 05:09 »
0
Quote
Same to you! Happy fourth of July!  :)

Enjoy the fireworks and bbqs. My country's independence day is on the 7th of September (Brazil)!

« Reply #83 on: July 03, 2017, 07:11 »
0
Quote
Same to you! Happy fourth of July!  :)

Enjoy the fireworks and bbqs. My country's independence day is on the 7th of September (Brazil)!


 ;)

« Reply #84 on: July 03, 2017, 20:58 »
+1
Hello to all, this is my first message here. I finished reading the book a few days ago, and I must to say that is very helpful to newbies. I had a lack of knowledge about this business that the book has covered.

I think that the point is not if you like more or less the job of Alex but If he has a good knowledge of this world and he know how to transmit it to others. And he has made a great job with this book.

Regards and sorry for my english.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #85 on: July 04, 2017, 01:31 »
0
Quote
Hello to all, this is my first message here. I finished reading the book a few days ago, and I must to say that is very helpful to newbies. I had a lack of knowledge about this business that the book has covered.

I think that the point is not if you like more or less the job of Alex but If he has a good knowledge of this world and he know how to transmit it to others. And he has made a great job with this book.

Thanks Enhiro for your kind words and welcome to the forum where you'll find a wealth of information from experienced contributors. 

Would be cool to know how you're getting on in this tough game, let's keep in touch!

Alex

nazlisart

  • I create therefore I AM
« Reply #86 on: July 07, 2017, 02:08 »
0
Quote
I understand, but why anyone would pay money for a recipe for inaction? I don't have to pay to learn to do nothing. I can do nothing all by myself, without a guru's advice. If I make an effort it is because I want something good out of it.

If you did not succeed in this particular venue, that's fine, it's life, but do you think trying to sell a book on "how to fail to be an actor, scientist, plumber, international spy etc" will work? Do you see many of those around? Perhaps people would like to read about a unique expertise rather than trying to start something they cannot finish because they only learn that they will fail?

You make some valid points. I've certainly approached drafting this guide in a rather unconventional way, but in a thought-provoking and accurate manner, nevertheless. So much so that we're having an interesting discussion on what it means to "fail" or "succeed". 

If the aim is to be "brutally honest", I cannot sugarcoat, how easy it would be to make money from Microstock to try to get more book-sales, because everybody here knows how tough this industry is - it would be a "brutally dishonest guide" and i'm sure there's many of those out there.

I don't know whether i'm "failing" or "succeeding" at this game but all I know is that I quite enjoy it and would like to pass on my knowledge to others. I'm by no means a guru, just a travel photojournalist. In any case, I don't believe in "failure", as in life we must learn from our mistakes and try to improve with every minute. It's more like feedback than anything. To receive these feedback to improve, we must try try try try and try - the opposite of inaction. Oh and try some more. 
 
I don't want to give too much away as I'm hoping enough people will want to read it but here's the opening paragraph from Chapter 12 "Getting . Out of Microstock":

It may seem strange in a comprehensive guide to how to be successful at Microstock to end with a chapter on how to get . out of it, but please hear me out! This chapter is aimed at both those more experienced contributors and those just starting out, since both will face similar dilemmas, as I will outline in this chapter.I started in Microstock because my perception at the time was that it was the most practical and low-cost way to monetise my images. During the past four years, I have painstakingly put in the time and effort to keep learning how to make my images stand out from the herd. My experience of submitting to various Agencies has given me an education in the technical and commercial/editorial aspects of photography simply by participating in those markets....

Hope, fresh ideas and success stories is what sells. I have everyday life for "Brutally Honest Grounding"! Maybe have a chapter like "pitfalls and precautions" but overall keep it upbeat. Also something else to reconsider, I've read somewhere that 90% of internet book sales come from the tittle - intriguing and exciting is the key...

One more very important thing: Illustrations, vectors, video & audio is also considered Microstock, no Guide is complete without them (not to mention graphic and video templates, PSD actions and staff that you find in Envato that could be also considered Microstock). All those are far less expensive to produce (except video) and have, in average, far higher RPI & RPD from photos. I'd gladly give you my two bits about vectors but if you want to cover the whole subject you need to interview many more people...

I hope this was helpful
Wish you all the best!


Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #87 on: July 07, 2017, 02:27 »
+1
Quote
Hope, fresh ideas and success stories is what sells. I have everyday life for "Brutally Honest Grounding"! Maybe have a chapter like "pitfalls and precautions" but overall keep it upbeat. Also something else to reconsider, I've read somewhere that 90% of internet book sales come from the tittle - intriguing and exciting is the key...

One more very important thing: Illustrations, vectors, video & audio is also considered Microstock, no Guide is complete without them (not to mention graphic and video templates, PSD actions and staff that you find in Envato that could be also considered Microstock). All those are far less expensive to produce (except video) and have, in average, far higher RPI & RPD from photos. I'd gladly give you my two bits about vectors but if you want to cover the whole subject you need to interview many more people...

I hope this was helpful
Wish you all the best!

Great feedback and yes helpful.

You're right that I approached the industry in a pessimistic tone and it may put some readers off. So much so that one of my chapters was called "Getting . out of Microstock", was toned down to "Opportunities Outside of Microstock", together with a softer language in the body (learn --> earn a bit to cover some costs --> look elsewhere for opportunities). In my book and blog I write extensively about diversification, such as submitting premium images to Midstock agencies, photography competitions, Print on Demand & fine art photography.

I completely agree about vectors, footage and illustrations as a way to diversify. I've only recently started on footage, as a way to find other viable opportunities, and would be foolish to write anything about it at this stage due to my inexperience, unless it was an interview with someone who's been doing it for a while.

I would gladly take up your offer to interview you for a blog post about vectors, I'll PM you - thanks.

Alex


« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 02:36 by Brasilnut »

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #88 on: July 26, 2017, 10:14 »
0
So quiet here, seems like everybody's already packed their bags and heading to the beach  8)

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #89 on: July 26, 2017, 13:31 »
+1
Nice subtle bump there.

« Reply #90 on: July 26, 2017, 13:34 »
0
I am here lying on the beach, sipping a gin and tonic and reading the brutally honest guide.
What else do I need?

drd

« Reply #91 on: July 26, 2017, 13:50 »
0
Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock Photography

I will be brutally honest with you. This is just another PR article. The 2 links mentioned in the article are not even getting any views. Why should I give 10 for this?

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #92 on: September 12, 2017, 14:17 »
0
Anybody seen the latest edition of Amateur Photographer UK?  :D
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 14:34 by Brasilnut »


 

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