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Author Topic: similar images  (Read 2298 times)

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« on: November 13, 2016, 12:45 »
+1
Hello everyone,

I am a newbie in stock photography and I am realy curious if you can help me with the problem I have on Adobe stock regarding similar images  :(

how are these images similar...I understand that the background is the same but the product is different and what makes me wonder is why do they reject both of them because of similarity ?


alno

« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2016, 13:10 »
+5
Hello everyone,

I am a newbie in stock photography and I am realy curious if you can help me with the problem I have on Adobe stock regarding similar images  :(

how are these images similar...I understand that the background is the same but the product is different and what makes me wonder is why do they reject both of them because of similarity ?

It's all up to reviewer, that one definitely wasn't Italian :) If he or she is holding a pack of potato chips and Coca-Cola can while reviewing... Well, it's all the same pasta then, not fettuccine or tagliolini :) Try uploading similar images in several days, Fotolia has very short review times and it's easier that writing emails to them about incorrect reviews.
Nice pictures by the way. 

« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2016, 14:16 »
0
thank you Irina, I will try to submit the images again and see what happens. I think they were bored with the review of the 50 img. batch and maybe that was the reason  :)
thanks for the quick reply and for your help. I love your slow mo videos  8)

« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2016, 17:21 »
0
Hello everyone,

I am a newbie in stock photography and I am realy curious if you can help me with the problem I have on Adobe stock regarding similar images  :(

how are these images similar...I understand that the background is the same but the product is different and what makes me wonder is why do they reject both of them because of similarity ?

By Adobe/FT similar usually means that they have enough of a certain type of image, subject is already well covered. I used to get this rejection when I uploaded flowers, now I don't even try.
That's why they rejected both images.

« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2016, 12:26 »
+1
hi Dodie, you might be right but the thing is i uploaded 50 photos on the same collection with the theme pasta raw and they have accepted the large majority ( I made a project titled pasta raw and shot around 100 images then i selected the best 50 img. ). I have resubmit and I am still waiting for the review  to see what happens. I`ll keep you up to date. thank you all for trying to help !!!

« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2016, 08:51 »
+2
To get away with this kind of thing you can for instance flip one of the images or change the place where the eggs are etc. Then the algorithm that determines similarity will not detect similar shapes in similar positions.

« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2016, 09:17 »
0
Hello everyone,

I am a newbie in stock photography and I am realy curious if you can help me with the problem I have on Adobe stock regarding similar images  :(

how are these images similar...I understand that the background is the same but the product is different and what makes me wonder is why do they reject both of them because of similarity ?

It's all up to reviewer, that one definitely wasn't Italian :) If he or she is holding a pack of potato chips and Coca-Cola can while reviewing... Well, it's all the same pasta then, not fettuccine or tagliolini :) Try uploading similar images in several days, Fotolia has very short review times and it's easier that writing emails to them about incorrect reviews.
Nice pictures by the way.

writing e mails about incorrect refusals because of similarity is a mess. Meanwhile I insist, that they tell me to which image a refused one might be similar. (Count days before you get that issue settled). Before I get that information - if I get it at all - I have to write countless e mails always getting a standard blabla reply. Anyway they often refuse because of similarity although there aren't any similar ones.  BTW similarity refers to images of the contibutor not to all fotolia images. If that were the case we could stop uploading anyway.
Be careful about reuploading. I don't do that. They easily suspend accounts for similarity.



Giveme5

« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2016, 09:53 »
0
FT could consider this spamming due to the images being too similar. This happen to me one time when I added in light effects- they told me to only submit just one image or risk being rejected.  Thus submit only one image that the buyer has room to crop or zoom.

« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2016, 14:41 »
0
Hello everyone,

I am a newbie in stock photography and I am realy curious if you can help me with the problem I have on Adobe stock regarding similar images  :(

how are these images similar...I understand that the background is the same but the product is different and what makes me wonder is why do they reject both of them because of similarity ?

try to use the "note to reviewer" in the next shooting series


« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2016, 15:35 »
0
Thank you MatHayward for taking the time to check the photos and explaining what happens. I am new to microstock and I am trying to learn as much as possible in the shortest amount of time and thanks to everyone here I feel like I am heading in the right direction. Thanks everyone for your help !

« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2016, 15:39 »
+2
I am glad Adobe is taking this approach, because some of the "other guys" accept anything, and all buyers see are page after page after page of the same image, with a slight change somewhere...so slight, in fact, sometimes it's difficult to detect. In other words, contributors are just "stuffing" their portfolios to increase their visibility, i.e. trying (once again) to game the system, instead of supplying a quality product.

« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2016, 15:45 »
+2
I am glad Adobe is taking this approach, because some of the "other guys" accept anything, and all buyers see are page after page after page of the same image, with a slight change somewhere...so slight, in fact, sometimes it's difficult to detect. In other words, contributors are just "stuffing" their portfolios to increase their visibility, i.e. trying (once again) to game the system, instead of supplying a quality product.
and also that they are taking the time to come and explain on here.......I'm sure many of us greatly appreciate this openness vs the absence of other players on here and the obliqueness of their "communications"

« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2016, 15:51 »
0
I think I might be the victim of the microstock photography trend  :P . I was just trying to mimic what I saw in the search result ( for example : search by newest : pasta ) and I was hit with series of 30-50 photos...so I guessed this was the right aproach...I hope I will not be considered a spammer and have my account banned  :(

« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2016, 17:44 »
+2
The other guys really do need a MatHayward. He's been a real asset to us and I'm sure Fotolia as well. It seems like contributor confidence has increased tenfold in the last year

« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2017, 02:09 »
0
Test

« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2017, 03:29 »
+1
I am glad Adobe is taking this approach, because some of the "other guys" accept anything, and all buyers see are page after page after page of the same image, with a slight change somewhere...so slight, in fact, sometimes it's difficult to detect. In other words, contributors are just "stuffing" their portfolios to increase their visibility, i.e. trying (once again) to game the system, instead of supplying a quality product.

+1
I share your opinion. It's better to upload less but of a high quality rather than sell every single shot. At least not to ruin your own reputation.


SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2017, 06:51 »
0
Matt has pretty much covered it, but I think the most important question for me would be... if you uploaded the first picture, and saw somebody selling the second picture... how would you feel?

If you would be absolutely fine about it, then fair enough... but if you got angry and we're considering some kind of legal action, then I guess that answers whether they are too similar or not.

But on the other hand, if they accept your first image and not your second... and somebody needs an image to represebt long flat type pasta, then you'll have nothing to offer them. So I'm torn on whether they should be accepted or not. Good luck!


 

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