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Author Topic: 100 reasons to be happy  (Read 2456 times)

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« on: January 06, 2012, 18:17 »
0
Hi All,

 I spent a couple of days this holiday making a short video on the people that live on the streets of Seattle. Interviews with the homeless folks that are just trying to make it from one day to the next, shot on my Iphone. I asked 100 homeless people what they were happy for in 2011 I think you might find some of their answers inspiring. Please remember all the people you pass every day and what we might be able to learn from them. Thanks for watching and please share if you can this is a non profit project.

100 Reasons to be Happy


Peace,
Jonathan


lthn

    This user is banned.
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2012, 18:45 »
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Did you offer any help to any of these ppl, or you just used them to kinda grace yourself with this video?

Things like this remind me a bit of some of the 'fledgling young photographers' I know who's first shot at being an artist is getting into the face of these poor souls with their dslr's, do a B&W conversion and then an exhibition and walk around like a little peacock trying to establish themselves in the art community. Man if I could I'd just punch them into paralysis. Yeah, and then it's me being negative, not the whole thing...

« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2012, 19:02 »
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Hi Lthan,

Yes, I made a $1000 dollar donation to two of the cities homeless shelters and I pass out food and socks to the Seattle homeless every year for going on twenty years now, my sons are now old enough to help now so they come along as well. I spent a tough childhood and spent many days on the streets so my passion to share this comes from personal experience, my father also lived on the streets from the age of 14 until he made it back into the working class society. I do not want to glorify myself through the hardship of others I want to empower the people that maybe do not see or realize the hardships of the homeless and try to educate others to think of their fellow man. Not everything people do is to benefit themselves financially.

Best,
Jonathan

« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2012, 19:28 »
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When lost in a new city, the best folks to ask for directions are the homeless.  Some of them have gotten me out of some bad situations, and I always pay them well for their assistance. 

Very nice job, Jonathan.

« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2012, 21:07 »
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Hi Lthan,

Yes, I made a $1000 dollar donation to two of the cities homeless shelters and I pass out food and socks to the Seattle homeless every year for going on twenty years now, my sons are now old enough to help now so they come along as well. I spent a tough childhood and spent many days on the streets so my passion to share this comes from personal experience, my father also lived on the streets from the age of 14 until he made it back into the working class society. I do not want to glorify myself through the hardship of others I want to empower the people that maybe do not see or realize the hardships of the homeless and try to educate others to think of their fellow man. Not everything people do is to benefit themselves financially.

Best,
Jonathan

Very admirable.  Nice work.

« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2012, 19:29 »
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Hi Mantis,

 I really was the one that gained the most those two days. It made my own issues so much easier to deal with and I received so many hugs and hand shakes from truly kind people. I wish I could afford to do this kind of thing for a living. Maybe when I retire but being I am involved in stock photography it is hard to say when that day will come. :)

Cheers,
Jonathan

« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2012, 20:00 »
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Hi Mantis,

 I really was the one that gained the most those two days. It made my own issues so much easier to deal with and I received so many hugs and hand shakes from truly kind people. I wish I could afford to do this kind of thing for a living. Maybe when I retire but being I am involved in stock photography it is hard to say when that day will come. :)

Cheers,
Jonathan

Well, you have my deepest respect.

m@m

« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2012, 22:04 »
0
Hi Mantis,

 I really was the one that gained the most those two days. It made my own issues so much easier to deal with and I received so many hugs and hand shakes from truly kind people. I wish I could afford to do this kind of thing for a living. Maybe when I retire but being I am involved in stock photography it is hard to say when that day will come. :)

Cheers,
Jonathan

Well, you have my deepest respect.
Mine as well Jonathan, great job!

digitalexpressionimages

« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2012, 15:45 »
0
Sorry to be a nitpicker but I can't help it.

The first paragraph ends with a preposition "something to be happy for". Should read "something for which to be happy." Really nitpicky but some judge merit on grammar.

Not so nitpicky is the second paragraph at the beginning. When you do an interview, you are the interviewer while the one you interview is the interviewee.

Just trying to help you make the most professional video you can. Feel free to disregard.

« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2012, 16:13 »
0
Fantastic Jonathan. Keep up the good work!

« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2012, 16:43 »
0
Did you offer any help to any of these ppl, or you just used them to kinda grace yourself with this video?

Things like this remind me a bit of some of the 'fledgling young photographers' I know who's first shot at being an artist is getting into the face of these poor souls with their dslr's, do a B&W conversion and then an exhibition and walk around like a little peacock trying to establish themselves in the art community. Man if I could I'd just punch them into paralysis. Yeah, and then it's me being negative, not the whole thing...
@lthn
Wow you have that nice honest work there, which basically highlight the positiveness of hard situations,  and there is always someone trying to diminish it and try to show the negative side of it.

Find it funny that after the honest and positive answer to this post by Johnatan you don't find anything else to say?

« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2012, 01:24 »
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Hi digitalexpressionimages,

 Thank you for the critique, I will have my friend that did the editing fix it. This is a perfect example of someone that didn't go to school and spent to much time on the streets in my youth, grammar is one of my worst subjects. Thank you for the help if you see something else please let me know.

Thanks,
Jonathan

« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2012, 08:09 »
0
Did you offer any help to any of these ppl, or you just used them to kinda grace yourself with this video?

Things like this remind me a bit of some of the 'fledgling young photographers' I know who's first shot at being an artist is getting into the face of these poor souls with their dslr's, do a B&W conversion and then an exhibition and walk around like a little peacock trying to establish themselves in the art community. Man if I could I'd just punch them into paralysis. Yeah, and then it's me being negative, not the whole thing...
@lthn
Wow you have that nice honest work there, which basically highlight the positiveness of hard situations,  and there is always someone trying to diminish it and try to show the negative side of it.

Find it funny that after the honest and positive answer to this post by Johnatan you don't find anything else to say?

that's becauese ithn is currently banned.

« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2012, 08:46 »
0
Jonathan, thank you for sharing such a beautiful experience. So many are or feel invisible to the public, and even for just a moment you gave them a voice and looked them in the eye.

« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2012, 08:55 »
0
Did you offer any help to any of these ppl, or you just used them to kinda grace yourself with this video?

Things like this remind me a bit of some of the 'fledgling young photographers' I know who's first shot at being an artist is getting into the face of these poor souls with their dslr's, do a B&W conversion and then an exhibition and walk around like a little peacock trying to establish themselves in the art community. Man if I could I'd just punch them into paralysis. Yeah, and then it's me being negative, not the whole thing...
@lthn
Wow you have that nice honest work there, which basically highlight the positiveness of hard situations,  and there is always someone trying to diminish it and try to show the negative side of it.

Find it funny that after the honest and positive answer to this post by Johnatan you don't find anything else to say?

that's becauese ithn is currently banned.

Why? Just for that post? Surely not?

« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2012, 09:40 »
0
Jonathan, thank you for sharing such a beautiful experience. So many are or feel invisible to the public, and even for just a moment you gave them a voice and looked them in the eye.

You see the pain in their eyes but despite their situations you got them to focus on some personal positive. Bravo!

« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2012, 09:59 »
0
Jonathan, thank you for sharing such a beautiful experience. So many are or feel invisible to the public, and even for just a moment you gave them a voice and looked them in the eye.

You see the pain in their eyes but despite their situations you got them to focus on some personal positive. Bravo!
Good point! Truly warms the heart to see this! :)

rubyroo

« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2012, 09:59 »
0
Sorry to hear about your history Jonathan.  I had no idea about that.  

I've mentioned before here that I used to work with the homeless, and I wonder if you agree that, even on the average person's worst day, there is something that they can do with the greatest of ease that is a huge uphill climb or an impossibility for these people, as well as for the elderly/disabled/frail.

Just making a cup of tea for someone who physically can't make one for themselves, or for someone who has no money and no facilities to make one is a huge gift.  

These environments really taught me that when people say 'it's up to the strong to help the weak', they don't mean you have to be all that strong.  You just have to be stronger/more able than the person you're helping.  When you see the difficulties these people have - even when you have your own difficulties - it helps you to realise just how very able you are and what a difference a small thing can make.

The people who inspire me most are the people who work voluntarily in the centres that provide support to the homeless.  Without those people providing some sort of trustworthy structure and 'net', I don't think you'd see so much optimism in this video.  

I hope such videos encourage more young people to volunteer at the shelters and centres.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2012, 10:02 by rubyroo »

« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2012, 11:13 »
0
Did you offer any help to any of these ppl, or you just used them to kinda grace yourself with this video?

Things like this remind me a bit of some of the 'fledgling young photographers' I know who's first shot at being an artist is getting into the face of these poor souls with their dslr's, do a B&W conversion and then an exhibition and walk around like a little peacock trying to establish themselves in the art community. Man if I could I'd just punch them into paralysis. Yeah, and then it's me being negative, not the whole thing...
@lthn
Wow you have that nice honest work there, which basically highlight the positiveness of hard situations,  and there is always someone trying to diminish it and try to show the negative side of it.

Find it funny that after the honest and positive answer to this post by Johnatan you don't find anything else to say?

that's becauese ithn is currently banned.

Why? Just for that post? Surely not?

No, it was due to a long history of 'attacking' posts.

« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2012, 15:48 »
0
Hi Rubyroo,

 Thank you for the detailed message. I don't share my past a great deal because I don't want to use it as an excuse, if anything it has made me who I am today and I like myself so everything that has been served up was for a reason. I agree completely with you about the people that help the less fortunate, these are the truly giving people and they should all be commended. I met several of them that day and they were all so supportive, many of them started on the streets and the missions made it possible for them to get back on their feet and now they give back to the missions through their helping. Giving back is a wonderful gift and I think it can also put your own life in a better perspective especially during a recession when a lot of us are facing changes that we were not prepared for. I am not a follower of any one particular religious philosophy but I do believe in what John Bradford said  " There but for the grace of God go I ". Spread the love, it makes you the happiest person of all.

Cheers,
Jonathan

ann

  • FromLongIsland.com
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 00:21 »
0
This thread - in more ways than one - has reminded me why I should avoid assuming things about other people, including their motivations, life experience....

--------
FWIW
Re: "The first paragraph ends with a preposition "something to be happy for". Should read "something for which to be happy." Really nitpicky but some judge merit on grammar."

It's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. However, what's right (from a writing mechanics standpoint) and what's wise (for effective communication) can be two different things. So, if you suspect your audience will consider it an error if you end a sentence with a preposition, then, certainly, rephrase the sentence, ideally in a way that doesn't sound stilted. (former writing teacher, editor, proofreaderr...  ;) )

« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2012, 01:33 »
0
This thread - in more ways than one - has reminded me why I should avoid assuming things about other people, including their motivations, life experience....

--------
FWIW
Re: "The first paragraph ends with a preposition "something to be happy for". Should read "something for which to be happy." Really nitpicky but some judge merit on grammar."

It's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. However, what's right (from a writing mechanics standpoint) and what's wise (for effective communication) can be two different things. So, if you suspect your audience will consider it an error if you end a sentence with a preposition, then, certainly, rephrase the sentence, ideally in a way that doesn't sound stilted. (former writing teacher, editor, proofreaderr...  ;) )

I recall that either Fowler in The King's English or Partridge in Modern English Usage pointed out that the rule about prepositions was invented by Dryden and that nobody before or since has been able to apply it without sounding foolish. The construct Dryden disliked is respectable enough to have its own name, "prepositional stranding".
Winston Churchill reportedly once wrote a sarcastic marginal note protesting against the stilted "grammatical" writing style of a civil servant. It said: "This is the sort of English up with which I will not put".

Rules of Grammar are meant to facilitate clear communication, not to twist sentences into monstrosities that fit some "rule" that a misguided pedant has managed to foist on generations of English teachers.

It is silly to sound ridiculous just to appease people who believe (wrongly) that stranded prepositions are ungrammatical, purely because Dryden decided to be prejudiced against them.  That, at least, is the opinion of this former newspaper editor.

ann

  • FromLongIsland.com
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2012, 03:58 »
0
BaldricksTrousers - I certainly agree with your "It is silly to sound ridiculous," which is why I included "...ideally in a way that doesn't sound stilted."   :)

The above sentence reminds me of a somewhat related point. Though the comma/period goes inside closing quotes in America, it looks incorrect to so many that I sometimes "rearrange the furniture" to avoid it.  (At least I never "feel badly.")   smiles - Ann

« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2012, 04:20 »
0
I recall that either Fowler in The King's English or Partridge in Modern English Usage pointed out that the rule about prepositions was invented by Dryden and that nobody before or since has been able to apply it without sounding foolish. The construct Dryden disliked is respectable enough to have its own name, "prepositional stranding".
Winston Churchill reportedly once wrote a sarcastic marginal note protesting against the stilted "grammatical" writing style of a civil servant. It said: "This is the sort of English up with which I will not put".

Rules of Grammar are meant to facilitate clear communication, not to twist sentences into monstrosities that fit some "rule" that a misguided pedant has managed to foist on generations of English teachers.

It is silly to sound ridiculous just to appease people who believe (wrongly) that stranded prepositions are ungrammatical, purely because Dryden decided to be prejudiced against them.  That, at least, is the opinion of this former newspaper editor.

^^^ Good that is. Very.

rubyroo

« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2012, 04:27 »
0
 :D :D :D

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