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Author Topic: General Tips for newbies  (Read 1607 times)

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Photodune Reject

« on: March 10, 2017, 17:07 »
0
Tips on what not to do in this business

1.   Dont shoot stock photos on your family vacation thus bring only your cell phone your family will truly appreciate this!
2.   Always charge for a photo session- example:  people or a restaurant photos. Never do it for free thinking you will make your money back soon in this business!
3.   Dont spend a ton of money when starting out! Keep it low and see if you truly love this type of work.

Good luck

 :)


« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2017, 17:16 »
+2
why are you so adamant on warning/helping/educating newbies? i never understood the self destructing practice of photographers helping competition, which includes myself at times.

its like coca cola helping cott how to make cola

anyway, only those 3 tips?

1. doesnt make sense, i shoot holiday snaps with my DLSR
2. obviously
3. what is a ton of money? you need a good camera and quality lenses at the minimum. its a business, you need to invest to start out.

Photodune Reject

« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2017, 17:21 »
0
why are you so adamant on warning/helping/educating newbies? i never understood the self destructing practice of photographers helping competition, which includes myself at times.

its like coca cola helping cott how to make cola

anyway, only those 3 tips?

1. doesnt make sense, i shoot holiday snaps with my DLSR
2. obviously
3. what is a ton of money? you need a good camera and quality lenses at the minimum. its a business, you need to invest to start out.

so this isn't a site to help anyone? I must have not read the site rules. Okay, no more helping out the competition as you request.

Been real you all...

« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2017, 17:36 »
+1
i didn't request anything. just wanted to understand your reasoning.

« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2017, 19:48 »
0
The first one is total nonsense, I'm guessing most of us started just that way and fell in love with photography, shooting travel snaps of some kind. I don't think there are many people who were like "Ok I'll just buy this fine camera and lens I have no clue about to start a busyness" or "I hate photography and fine equipment, I do it just for the money".

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2017, 02:55 »
+1
Nothing wrong with providing advice, but yours is probably a bit rudimentary, and debatable at best.

1. A decent shot of the pyramids, on your family trip to Egypt, although probably an oversaturated subject... is probably going to sell more than a picture of your sand-filled socks in the washing machine when you get back home.   

2. Obviously

3. What everyone else has said. Starting out in photography in general, I'd probably agree with that. Starting out in stock... you need a certain standard of quality. 

« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2017, 17:00 »
0
I guess the 3rd one is the most important. There are lots of people who once decided to become photographers "just because it's easy money". They bought equipment, software and... failed. No return on investments at all. Moreover, who will buy poorly done photo? So this tip makes sense!

« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2017, 00:16 »
0
1.   Dont shoot stock photos on your family vacation thus bring only your cell phone your family will truly appreciate this!

This is similar to the advice I read in a book about making money from your photography. The author stated that when submitting images to publications, don't use photographs that you've taken on your holidays.

In any case, I disagree with this advice. Sorry to burst your bubble but not all photographs taken on holidays are snapshots. When I was on holiday on Kangaroo Island in South Australia in the 90s, I shot a pelican in flight over water with my Canon T70 35mm SLR and 75-300mm zoom. I made greeting cards out of the resulting image and sold them through a small art gallery (well, one of them was stolen as well.) Ive also sold a number of the cards at a market stall to tourists from passing cruise ships in addition to an 8 x 12 inch print. I also sold a framed 8 x 12 inch print of the very same image in an exhibition for $100. And recently, I sold a photo through Shutterstock that I took on a visit to Bora Bora with family (that had only been online for a couple of days.)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 00:23 by dragonblade »

« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2017, 01:16 »
+3
Making a few cents doesn't outweigh the annoyance of you trying to get your family to do things for images while you're supposed to be on holiday.

« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2017, 09:47 »
+2
I think for number 3 it will vary by person. Easy fix, don't have a family then you can go anywhere and hang out wherever you want for as long as you want taking photos. I can see where keeping a family vacation somewhat separate from stock photo endevours would be a smart thing to do for your family.


 

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