MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Plane crashed in my front yard  (Read 1826 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Shelma1

« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2017, 16:39 »
0
His engine exploded. Plane caught fire. Could have landed in the water because he was over the bay, but he figured my front lawn would be better.
I'd hazard a guess that landing on water would have a high probability of causing the plane to flip with likely fatal consequences. These small planes have fixed wheels, don't they? And wheels dipping into water would face tremendous drag.
But that's just a guess.

It's funny, because someone asked the pilot at the scene what he'd normally do in this situation, and he answered that he'd try to land the plane in water. What made him decide to head back to land instead of landing in the bay is anyone's guess. Another pilot did the same thing last year...he was over the Hudson River when his engine failed, and instead of trying the river he attempted to make it back to Teterboro airport, which was impossible. He ended up crashing a half mile from my parents' house in Cresskill, which is not too far inland from the river...and nowhere near any airport and many, many miles from Teterboro.


« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2017, 21:11 »
+1
His engine exploded. Plane caught fire. Could have landed in the water because he was over the bay, but he figured my front lawn would be better.
I'd hazard a guess that landing on water would have a high probability of causing the plane to flip with likely fatal consequences. These small planes have fixed wheels, don't they? And wheels dipping into water would face tremendous drag.
But that's just a guess.

Yes, you're right that ditching a plane with fixed wheels in the water is very bad news (not that going in with retracted wheels is a barrel of laughs.)

I used to fly and was based at a small airport that was surrounded on three sides by water. Pilots who flew there were trained to land differently from those who went into land-based airports. We came in "high and hot" so if we lost the engine on approach, we'd have enough height and speed to glide to the runway. No way did we want to go into the drink.

« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2017, 21:14 »
0
His engine exploded. Plane caught fire. Could have landed in the water because he was over the bay, but he figured my front lawn would be better.
I'd hazard a guess that landing on water would have a high probability of causing the plane to flip with likely fatal consequences. These small planes have fixed wheels, don't they? And wheels dipping into water would face tremendous drag.
But that's just a guess.

It's funny, because someone asked the pilot at the scene what he'd normally do in this situation, and he answered that he'd try to land the plane in water. What made him decide to head back to land instead of landing in the bay is anyone's guess. Another pilot did the same thing last year...he was over the Hudson River when his engine failed, and instead of trying the river he attempted to make it back to Teterboro airport, which was impossible. He ended up crashing a half mile from my parents' house in Cresskill, which is not too far inland from the river...and nowhere near any airport and many, many miles from Teterboro.

I find this very strange. A water landing with fixed wheels is almost guaranteed to send the plane tumbling. As I mentioned in my other post, when I flew out of an airport surrounded by water, I was trained to approach  high and fast to allow a glide to the runway. We did everything possible to avoid a water landing.

That said, landing in rough terrain or trees is pretty tough too. We did overland training that involved looking for flat terrain to land on if the engine quit. The instructor actually killed the engine during these exercises and we had to go through the motions for the approach -- although thankfully, I was never required to land in someone's field. They generally don't instruct you to land on highways because of the power lines. Those will trip you as easily as water.

ETA: You can easily flip the plane even with retracted wheels, especially if one of the wings hits the water. One of the things that was so amazing when Sully put his plane down in the Hudson is that he didn't flip it.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 21:21 by polar »

« Reply #28 on: May 18, 2017, 21:22 »
+1
Wow! Glad you are ok.

Shelma1

« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2017, 22:04 »
0
His engine exploded. Plane caught fire. Could have landed in the water because he was over the bay, but he figured my front lawn would be better.
I'd hazard a guess that landing on water would have a high probability of causing the plane to flip with likely fatal consequences. These small planes have fixed wheels, don't they? And wheels dipping into water would face tremendous drag.
But that's just a guess.

It's funny, because someone asked the pilot at the scene what he'd normally do in this situation, and he answered that he'd try to land the plane in water. What made him decide to head back to land instead of landing in the bay is anyone's guess. Another pilot did the same thing last year...he was over the Hudson River when his engine failed, and instead of trying the river he attempted to make it back to Teterboro airport, which was impossible. He ended up crashing a half mile from my parents' house in Cresskill, which is not too far inland from the river...and nowhere near any airport and many, many miles from Teterboro.

I find this very strange. A water landing with fixed wheels is almost guaranteed to send the plane tumbling. As I mentioned in my other post, when I flew out of an airport surrounded by water, I was trained to approach  high and fast to allow a glide to the runway. We did everything possible to avoid a water landing.

That said, landing in rough terrain or trees is pretty tough too. We did overland training that involved looking for flat terrain to land on if the engine quit. The instructor actually killed the engine during these exercises and we had to go through the motions for the approach -- although thankfully, I was never required to land in someone's field. They generally don't instruct you to land on highways because of the power lines. Those will trip you as easily as water.

ETA: You can easily flip the plane even with retracted wheels, especially if one of the wings hits the water. One of the things that was so amazing when Sully put his plane down in the Hudson is that he didn't flip it.

Well, I guess he had to choose water or forest. And being from the other side of the country he was probably unfamiliar with the area. I'm still amazed that Sully was able to land that jet on the river.

But now I'm wondering...why not the beach? I have no idea how hard it would be to land on sand, but at least he'd have open space there. Maybe no lights would make it hard to see?

« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2017, 07:43 »
0
Ditching any aircraft in the water is extermely hazardous

https://youtu.be/pjZWB0-NqWA?t=25

« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2017, 09:33 »
+2
His engine exploded. Plane caught fire. Could have landed in the water because he was over the bay, but he figured my front lawn would be better.

I'd hazard a guess that landing on water would have a high probability of causing the plane to flip with likely fatal consequences. These small planes have fixed wheels, don't they? And wheels dipping into water would face tremendous drag.
But that's just a guess.


It's funny, because someone asked the pilot at the scene what he'd normally do in this situation, and he answered that he'd try to land the plane in water. What made him decide to head back to land instead of landing in the bay is anyone's guess. Another pilot did the same thing last year...he was over the Hudson River when his engine failed, and instead of trying the river he attempted to make it back to Teterboro airport, which was impossible. He ended up crashing a half mile from my parents' house in Cresskill, which is not too far inland from the river...and nowhere near any airport and many, many miles from Teterboro.


I find this very strange. A water landing with fixed wheels is almost guaranteed to send the plane tumbling. As I mentioned in my other post, when I flew out of an airport surrounded by water, I was trained to approach  high and fast to allow a glide to the runway. We did everything possible to avoid a water landing.

That said, landing in rough terrain or trees is pretty tough too. We did overland training that involved looking for flat terrain to land on if the engine quit. The instructor actually killed the engine during these exercises and we had to go through the motions for the approach -- although thankfully, I was never required to land in someone's field. They generally don't instruct you to land on highways because of the power lines. Those will trip you as easily as water.

ETA: You can easily flip the plane even with retracted wheels, especially if one of the wings hits the water. One of the things that was so amazing when Sully put his plane down in the Hudson is that he didn't flip it.


Well, I guess he had to choose water or forest. And being from the other side of the country he was probably unfamiliar with the area. I'm still amazed that Sully was able to land that jet on the river.

But now I'm wondering...why not the beach? I have no idea how hard it would be to land on sand, but at least he'd have open space there. Maybe no lights would make it hard to see?


I'm assuming that he was trained to look for flat terrain to land in, but sometimes there are no good choices. A  beach that was wet and hard-packed might work -- probably better than a forest. But you'd probably not have much luck if the sand is soft, dry and loose.

If you read accounts of Sully's landing, you'll see that one of their major concerns was making sure the plane was not yawed right or left on landing and that the wingtips were kept out of the water. Either would probably have caused the plane to cartwheel and/or break up. He had to be dead straight and level when he hit the water -- and he had no engines to control the plane's position. Plus he was very low in the air, having just taken off, and had less than four minutes to pull it off after losing his engines.

If he hadn't made an almost instantaneous decision to land in the water instead of trying for an airport, they probably wouldn't have made it. If he'd tried to go back to LaGuardia, he might well have crashed right in the middle of Manhattan. It was a truly remarkable feat of piloting and he probably saved many lives by doing what he did.

ETA: Regarding your comments about the relative safety of private versus commercial pilots, here's an interesting article by a former military and commercial pilot about how budget airlines are employing less experienced pilots to save money. She notes: "As one captain explained: Everybody wants their $99 ticket but added: you dont get [Captain] Sully for ninety-nine bucks. Instead, you you might get an accident waiting to happen."

http://theconversation.com/rising-number-of-inexperienced-pilots-may-lead-to-more-crashes-39593
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 10:02 by polar »

« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2017, 14:50 »
+1
Glad you're all OK - I just happened upon this thread a couple of days late. I did a search to see if I could find a news story, and there you are!

http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Pilot-Small-Plane-Crash-Eagleswood-Ocean-County-New-Jersey--422657324.html

I hope the water situation can be fixed quickly...

Shelma1

« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2017, 15:36 »
0
The pilot's insurance adjuster assured us someone will be coming to test the soil soon. I'm guessing that based on the location of the crash...downhill and 150 feet from my well...my water may not really be affected. Though I am drinking bottled water for now.

They need to talk to the pilot and check the fuel receipt to get an idea of how much fuel was on the plane. It all leaked except about 2 gallons. Really, it's amazing that a plane that was on fire and had the fuel tanks rupture did not explode. (The fire dept covered it with foam, of course.)

I do wish some of the witnesses who saw the plane on fire in the sky had called 911 before the plane crashed. I think I may be the only person who called. Several people told me they'd seen the plane in flames and just watched until it "disappeared," which is when it crashed. It wouldn't have stopped the crash, of course, but I'm really surprised none of them thought to report a flying plane on fire.

« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2017, 18:00 »
+1
glad you are not hurt! and you're all OK!


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
20 Replies
5171 Views
Last post May 19, 2009, 13:31
by null
32 Replies
8449 Views
Last post January 23, 2010, 11:36
by willie
1 Replies
1397 Views
Last post May 01, 2011, 01:56
by sharpshot
13 Replies
844 Views
Last post June 23, 2013, 17:31
by picture5469
62 Replies
4679 Views
Last post July 31, 2014, 13:35
by borg

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors