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Author Topic: Stop Complaining  (Read 11635 times)

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« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2017, 18:02 »
0
Looking at the world with rose tinted glasses doesn't change the world only your perception of it.  Sometimes complaining is the first step to changing things, more often it's not, but you have to test the waters. It's not all negative.

Complain if you can change something. Don't complain if you can't. If my neighbor is blasting his music at 2am, I would complain to the landlord. If the neighbor is a contributor and he's making 5x as much as me, what's the point of complaining?

It's not really about looking at the world with rose tinted glasses. complaining about falling sales isn't going to stop all the other contributors from uploading new work. The only thing you can do is analyze your portfolio's weaknesses and learn to compete better against an ever growing competitive environment.

You are not getting it, remove the glasses, but then again you don't even follow you own advice.

If you want to complain, no one is going to stop you. I'm not here to convince people, only offering a solution. I've interacted with a lot of negative people over the years...they always have a problem for every solution. This is no different.


« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2017, 00:08 »
+8
It still feels good to let loose about it even though it won't make a difference. I find comfort knowing I'm not the only one upset ... we are in the same boat.
True but in the end just complaining achieves nothing you have to do something or it becomes whining

Do what, exactly?   What are your solutions? 

So far there have been boycotts, mass content deletions, negotiations, upload stoppages, etc., both by groups and individuals.  But things on many sites just keep getting worse. 

Let's assume at least some "whiners" have strong portfolios, original ideas, good niches, top equipment, both lighting and photographic, and a diligent work ethic.  Probably even a positive attitude for years before things went to spit.  And let's assume these guys are losing money anyway because the market is just too crowded and two of the top 3 sites and a bunch of small ones are constantly  thinking of ways to screw us and keep more of our earnings for themselves.

What's your advice to those guys?  If you have some great solution to the decline of microstock incomes, let's hear it. 

I still make what would be considered a living wage in most Western countries, so I am not going away anytime soon,  but since my current income is 1/3 of what it was a few years ago, and dropping by 15-20% annually whether I work my a$$ off or not, I will bltch, moan, whine, and complain whenever I d@mn well feel like it. 

« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 00:20 by PixelBytes »

« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2017, 01:58 »
+4
Do what, exactly?   What are your solutions? 

So far there have been boycotts, mass content deletions, negotiations, upload stoppages, etc., both by groups and individuals.  But things on many sites just keep getting worse. 

Let's assume at least some "whiners" have strong portfolios, original ideas, good niches, top equipment, both lighting and photographic, and a diligent work ethic.  Probably even a positive attitude for years before things went to spit.  And let's assume these guys are losing money anyway because the market is just too crowded and two of the top 3 sites and a bunch of small ones are constantly  thinking of ways to screw us and keep more of our earnings for themselves.

What's your advice to those guys?  If you have some great solution to the decline of microstock incomes, let's hear it. 

I still make what would be considered a living wage in most Western countries, so I am not going away anytime soon,  but since my current income is 1/3 of what it was a few years ago, and dropping by 15-20% annually whether I work my a$$ off or not, I will bltch, moan, whine, and complain whenever I d@mn well feel like it.

I'll bite.

Photography is one of the easiest hobbies to get into right now. Everyone and their grandma has a camera with a phone. There are 600 million Instagram users and many of them consider themselves photographers. The stock photography market is one of the most saturated markets in existence and the value of photos are dropping by the day. There is nothing anyone can do about it. Everyone already knows the laws of supply of demand, so it speaks for itself.

So what is the solution? There is no one solution that fits all. There are a number of solutions and whether it works or not depends on the talent and determination of the contributor. So what are possible solutions?

1. Diversity. Photos, vectors and videos. A pure photography portfolio is going the see faster continued decline than a diverse one.

2. Think commercially. Original ideas doesn't mean anything unless it's something the buyers need. I've seen some of my original ideas getting outperformed by non-original ideas by 100-1.

3. Stop going after niches. Pebble watch tried to fill a niche and now it's dead, got destroyed by Apple and Android watches. Niches always get filled in by the big guys sooner or later.

4. Learn some SEO and keywordings. With 100 million images on SS, top-notch keywording is super important if you want your work to be found. An image with good keywording is more resistant to search engine changes. Native English speakers have an advantage over foreign contributors and I rarely see them take advantage of it.

5. Learn to compete with the best of them. Contributors are not entitled to get sales because they uploading some images, just like how college students are not entitled to a job just because they have a degree. Buyers only need a few images and if what you're offering is not up there with best of them, then the buyer will pass your image over. That's just reality.

6. Learn a new trade. Microstock was my 2nd passive income trade, right after developing apps. The App market has gone to **** and Microstock is heaven compared to that madness. Less work and much higher returns. I'm now working on my 3rd passive income stream and it's starting to gain traction.

7. Accept that the market is never going backwards. No nuclear bomb will be going off destroying everything and rebirthing the market. Even if does happen, all the contributors will fill it back up in a matter of weeks. The market will continue to saturate, just like every other industry in existence. This makes point #5 super important.

So go ahead, bltch, moan and complain. It won't solve problems. Meanwhile, some optimistic upstart somewhere is determined to create and upload high valued content and start eating other people's lunches.

« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2017, 02:11 »
+4
Is it not possible that some of the complaining is by people that have reached the same point of diminishing returns that you reached in the app market? There are still people making good returns in that market that would see your attitude about it in the same way as you see the attitude of some of the photographers on this forum.

Some "complainers" here had the exact same attutude as you a few years ago when they were only a couple of years in.

« Reply #54 on: February 12, 2017, 02:17 »
0
Is it not possible that some of the complaining is by people that have reached the same point of diminishing returns that you reached in the app market? There are still people making good returns in that market that would see your attitude about it in the same way as you see the attitude of some of the photographers on this forum.

Some "complainers" here had the exact same attutude as you a few years ago when they were only a couple of years in.

The app market has been taken over by large players and there's an occasional breakout hit by an indie developer. Overall, 99% of apps don't make a profit.

I'm just acknowledging the state of the App Store. I don't go to any message board to complain about it. I accepted the reality of it and moved on to other fields.
 
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 02:29 by Minsc »

« Reply #55 on: February 12, 2017, 02:39 »
+5
So your inability to make a living in that market was totally independent of your skill level? You couldn't make a decent living making apps not because you couldn't hack it but because of some outside factor? Why weren't you one of those few hit indie developers?

Sounds like you are just making excuses because you couldn't compete.

« Reply #56 on: February 12, 2017, 02:55 »
0
So your inability to make a living in that market was totally independent of your skill level? You couldn't make a decent living making apps not because you couldn't hack it but because of some outside factor? Why weren't you one of those few hit indie developers?

Sounds like you are just making excuses because you couldn't compete.

It depends on what you consider a one hit wonder. I had a couple decent hits that generated over $25,000 in total profit with a budget of less than $1000.

You're right, I can't compete with them anymore. Apps face heavy decline after the first couple months and I don't have millions of dollars to spend on ads. Besides, my time is better spent in microstock, where my earnings can potentially be more than 20x of what I earned in the App Store.

I accept what can possibly happen in Microstock, and I plan to be a happy old fart contributor when the time comes.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 02:59 by Minsc »

« Reply #57 on: February 12, 2017, 15:41 »
+7
So your inability to make a living in that market was totally independent of your skill level? You couldn't make a decent living making apps not because you couldn't hack it but because of some outside factor? Why weren't you one of those few hit indie developers?

Sounds like you are just making excuses because you couldn't compete.

This is exactly the point.  The list above posted my Minsc is exactly what the relative newbies keep  saying to the experienced professionals on this forum.  As I said in my postk some of us have been doing those things,  but STILL seeing our incomes drop.

The fact is that even if you are doing everything right, you will reach the point of diminishing returns, and when it happens to you, you'll probably be bltching about it, here, or somewhere else, because it sucks.

Easy to say just go and spend a decade building another career.  Not so practical for everyone.  If you're 25 or 30, sure.  But if you're in your 50s there's not a huge job market clamoring to hire you even if you did bother to learn a whole new career. 

« Reply #58 on: February 12, 2017, 20:09 »
+1
Is it not possible that some of the complaining is by people that have reached the same point of diminishing returns that you reached in the app market? There are still people making good returns in that market that would see your attitude about it in the same way as you see the attitude of some of the photographers on this forum.

Some "complainers" here had the exact same attutude as you a few years ago when they were only a couple of years in.

The app market has been taken over by large players and there's an occasional breakout hit by an indie developer. Overall, 99% of apps don't make a profit.

I'm just acknowledging the state of the App Store. I don't go to any message board to complain about it. I accepted the reality of it and moved on to other fields.

I was in software development for about 20 years.   I always thought writing phone apps was a sucker bet - no one can possibly make money at $1 a sale.  An application that has real value takes months to develop.  If you can do it in 3 days, so can 1,000 other guys.    Except for the big blockbuster apps, no one has ever made money in that market.

On the few occasions when I looked for an app for a specific purpose or need, I found mostly buggy, incomplete, unsupported junk - "abandonware". 



« Reply #59 on: February 12, 2017, 21:53 »
+3
9. People who go annonymous to complain about complaints.

LMAO

all i can tell you is this.
...
if you're here to complain about ppl complaining...
get a better day-job, so you won't even have the time to come in here
to complain about complaints  :D :D :D

« Reply #60 on: February 16, 2017, 13:25 »
+6
This conversation while starting out as complaining about complaining has had some good insights as well. Just to give you some insight from an 'agency' perspective.

When you look at the original thinking around selling stock, the goal was to have as much content as you possibly could. The more content you had the better because you were guaranteed that a customer would find what they were looking for (sales for everyone).

With quantity, however, comes noise. It becomes clear after you hit a certain number of photos that while customers might be able to find something, the process of finding the right something takes longer and longer. Agencies respond by adjusting search algorithms to try and give customers exactly what they're looking for at the expense of photographers.

Still though, customers get more frustrated because it's harder to find a photo, photographers get more frustrated because their portfolio's revenue per item drops and while agencies might make the sale, their expenses increase as the number of items not selling (and the cost to maintain them) continues to grow exponentially, reducing their profitability.

For a marketplace like Envato, the tension between quantity of items and photographers earning a livable income is one we are wrestling with. We're also wrestling with the issue of customers not finding what they want.

Looked at another way, we have a growing number of photographers going after the same pie which means less for individual photographers. So while the amount of effort to create and maintain a healthy portfolio is the same, the return for that effort has been getting lower and lower as more photographers enter the industry.

So what levers does a marketplace like Envato have to be able to shift the needle so that the photographers we do have are earning a livable income in a way that keeps Envato profitable?

1. Increase the number of buyers
2. Reduce royalty rates
3. Eliminate content that doesn't sell
4. Limit the number of items a photographer can upload
5. Limit the number of photographers on the marketplace

While the first one is obvious, if the rate of new photographers coming to the platform outpaces the rate of new buyers, you have the same situation and in a highly competitive industry like stock photographry, marketshare shift is an expensive activity.

The second one is what some agencies have done, but not Envato. It's not really in our values to lower royalty rates to photographers.

We can eliminate photos that don't sell, but what if those photos are really amazing and the only reason they haven't sold is because they're buried? Does that serve customers and photographers well? We don't think so.

We can limit the number of items a photographer uploads but from a purely competitive perspective, why would we limit content uploading and give competitors the opportunity to showcase great content just because we don't 'have room' for any more photos? What guarantee is there that the photos uploaded will be the best?

 That leaves us with limiting the number of photographers on the marketplace. But how do you do that? How do you tell people you've accepted before that they're no longer able to sell with you? How do you pick and choose the photographers with the most potential to have the highest number of selling items?

There's not really an easy way to go about it. But the industry is not what it was five or ten years ago. As has been mentioned here already, the sheer number of stock photographers is exploding.

At Envato, we're committed to helping our community of authors (what we call creators) earn a livable income and for stock photography, that's meant some tough decisions in the last few months.

What we've seen is that customers are becoming more sophisticated and demanding in what they buy and rather than give them a library of photos they have to search long and hard through to find what they want, maybe we should do a bit of that curating for them and present the best we can get.

So, that's what we're trying to do. We've updated our quality guidelines to try and give photographers the information they need to understand what our customers are after (based on the data we have from them).

We're cleaning up our library. One of the hardest things we've had to do is evaluate portfolios against our updated guidelines and tell people that what was once acceptable doesn't fit where we want to be and asking them to come back with a new sample portfolio that does meet our updated guidelines.

Our goal is to create a stock photography marketplace with really high quality photos our customers love to buy and ensure that our authors are able to earn a livable income.

This wasn't going to be a pitch but now that I am here at the end of my rant, I'll open it up to you. We're not perfect. We get things wrong. We make mistakes and sometimes even make decisions that don't seem to make sense.

But our values are the same. We want photographers in our community earning a livable income. We're not competing to be the biggest agency on the backs of photographers, we're hoping to be a better marketplace for photographers.

We want to support what you're doing, give you the tools and information you need to succeed and walk alongside you as you grow a sustainable business.

If that's the kind of relationship you want, let me know. It's not going to happen overnight and there will be growing pains as we work to get there, but don't doubt our sincerity. For those of you who have ignored or left Envato in the past, take another look. Reach out. We're not going to bite and we'll do our best to honestly and sincerely support you.

Thanks,

James.

P.S.
On the original topic's point of complaining or going negative. That's easy. If you've got a negative thing to say about Envato there are tons of threads and posts and blogs around the web you can feed on. As someone who actively reads and responds here, I will say that when the conversation is constructive, it's incredibly valuable to us and other photographers. You're the experts, we lean on you to tell us what's up, but we're humans too.

The internet is an easy place to go negative without thinking of the consequences. I personally, on this forum, have had my family threatened. I don't think that's representative of this community but civil discourse where different perspectives are acknowledged goes a long way in advancing the cause.

« Reply #61 on: February 16, 2017, 13:37 »
+1
Or No.6 you can do what Shutterstock did and tier your collection and buyers, nobody seems to complain to much about that.

« Reply #62 on: February 16, 2017, 13:48 »
+1
All right then - can anyone give any concrete reasons to be 'optimistic' about microstock?

There's a new dashboard at Shutterstock?

That's a psychological trick, the three main figures are always rising even though your sales may be declining.

But the font showing my earnings is now massive... so it feels like my earnings just got bigger. And that's the most important thing.

In contrary I see in big as they are getting smaller and smaller

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #63 on: February 16, 2017, 15:36 »
+8
If an agency remove content they previously were happy to accept, why would anyone be willing to start over, given what happened before? Once bitten ...

« Reply #64 on: February 16, 2017, 16:45 »
0
Wrong thread, sorry.

« Reply #65 on: February 16, 2017, 18:53 »
+2
This conversation while starting out as complaining about complaining has had some good insights as well. Just to give you some insight from an 'agency' perspective.

When you look at the original thinking around selling stock, the goal was to have as much content as you possibly could. The more content you had the better because you were guaranteed that a customer would find what they were looking for (sales for everyone).

With quantity, however, comes noise. It becomes clear after you hit a certain number of photos that while customers might be able to find something, the process of finding the right something takes longer and longer. Agencies respond by adjusting search algorithms to try and give customers exactly what they're looking for at the expense of photographers.

Still though, customers get more frustrated because it's harder to find a photo, photographers get more frustrated because their portfolio's revenue per item drops and while agencies might make the sale, their expenses increase as the number of items not selling (and the cost to maintain them) continues to grow exponentially, reducing their profitability.

For a marketplace like Envato, the tension between quantity of items and photographers earning a livable income is one we are wrestling with. We're also wrestling with the issue of customers not finding what they want.

Looked at another way, we have a growing number of photographers going after the same pie which means less for individual photographers. So while the amount of effort to create and maintain a healthy portfolio is the same, the return for that effort has been getting lower and lower as more photographers enter the industry.

So what levers does a marketplace like Envato have to be able to shift the needle so that the photographers we do have are earning a livable income in a way that keeps Envato profitable?

1. Increase the number of buyers
2. Reduce royalty rates
3. Eliminate content that doesn't sell
4. Limit the number of items a photographer can upload
5. Limit the number of photographers on the marketplace

While the first one is obvious, if the rate of new photographers coming to the platform outpaces the rate of new buyers, you have the same situation and in a highly competitive industry like stock photographry, marketshare shift is an expensive activity.

The second one is what some agencies have done, but not Envato. It's not really in our values to lower royalty rates to photographers.

We can eliminate photos that don't sell, but what if those photos are really amazing and the only reason they haven't sold is because they're buried? Does that serve customers and photographers well? We don't think so.

We can limit the number of items a photographer uploads but from a purely competitive perspective, why would we limit content uploading and give competitors the opportunity to showcase great content just because we don't 'have room' for any more photos? What guarantee is there that the photos uploaded will be the best?

 That leaves us with limiting the number of photographers on the marketplace. But how do you do that? How do you tell people you've accepted before that they're no longer able to sell with you? How do you pick and choose the photographers with the most potential to have the highest number of selling items?

There's not really an easy way to go about it. But the industry is not what it was five or ten years ago. As has been mentioned here already, the sheer number of stock photographers is exploding.

At Envato, we're committed to helping our community of authors (what we call creators) earn a livable income and for stock photography, that's meant some tough decisions in the last few months.

What we've seen is that customers are becoming more sophisticated and demanding in what they buy and rather than give them a library of photos they have to search long and hard through to find what they want, maybe we should do a bit of that curating for them and present the best we can get.

So, that's what we're trying to do. We've updated our quality guidelines to try and give photographers the information they need to understand what our customers are after (based on the data we have from them).

We're cleaning up our library. One of the hardest things we've had to do is evaluate portfolios against our updated guidelines and tell people that what was once acceptable doesn't fit where we want to be and asking them to come back with a new sample portfolio that does meet our updated guidelines.

Our goal is to create a stock photography marketplace with really high quality photos our customers love to buy and ensure that our authors are able to earn a livable income.

This wasn't going to be a pitch but now that I am here at the end of my rant, I'll open it up to you. We're not perfect. We get things wrong. We make mistakes and sometimes even make decisions that don't seem to make sense.

But our values are the same. We want photographers in our community earning a livable income. We're not competing to be the biggest agency on the backs of photographers, we're hoping to be a better marketplace for photographers.

We want to support what you're doing, give you the tools and information you need to succeed and walk alongside you as you grow a sustainable business.

If that's the kind of relationship you want, let me know. It's not going to happen overnight and there will be growing pains as we work to get there, but don't doubt our sincerity. For those of you who have ignored or left Envato in the past, take another look. Reach out. We're not going to bite and we'll do our best to honestly and sincerely support you.

Thanks,

James.

P.S.
On the original topic's point of complaining or going negative. That's easy. If you've got a negative thing to say about Envato there are tons of threads and posts and blogs around the web you can feed on. As someone who actively reads and responds here, I will say that when the conversation is constructive, it's incredibly valuable to us and other photographers. You're the experts, we lean on you to tell us what's up, but we're humans too.

The internet is an easy place to go negative without thinking of the consequences. I personally, on this forum, have had my family threatened. I don't think that's representative of this community but civil discourse where different perspectives are acknowledged goes a long way in advancing the cause.
OK my criticism is your inspection process is just awful I'm not saying I'm great but you'e rejected many of my best selling files and accepted stuff that hasn't sold anywhere. In fact I have a quite high RPI on your site but I can see no logic in what you accept or reject.

« Reply #66 on: February 16, 2017, 21:10 »
+1

So you're suggesting we shouldn't be optimistic? That's quite pessimistic.


Between Optimism and Pessimism there is Realism, and this is where I try to be.

Noone wants realism. Let me demonstrate. Realistically many people will sink and a lesser number will win. Those who are miserable love company, and that's what internet forums are for. Not everyone is in the same boat.

« Reply #67 on: February 16, 2017, 22:03 »
0
"This wasn't going to be a pitch but now that I am here at the end of my rant, I'll open it up to you. We're not perfect. We get things wrong. We make mistakes and sometimes even make decisions that don't seem to make sense. "

Yes, they don't seem to make much sense - unless you are trying to just piss people off.

That said - the agency that does get search right and treats contributors decently will probably do well. I never messed around with your old search, but this isn't a very good sign for treating contributors decently.

Ultimately we all have to decide if the effort is worth the return - for me I think it still is, but I am a lot less sure of that than I was when I started.

« Reply #68 on: February 17, 2017, 01:32 »
+5
This conversation while starting out as complaining about complaining has had some good insights as well. Just to give you some insight from an 'agency' perspective.

When you look at the original thinking around selling stock, the goal was to have as much content as you possibly could. The more content you had the better because you were guaranteed that a customer would find what they were looking for (sales for everyone).

With quantity, however, comes noise. It becomes clear after you hit a certain number of photos that while customers might be able to find something, the process of finding the right something takes longer and longer. Agencies respond by adjusting search algorithms to try and give customers exactly what they're looking for at the expense of photographers.

Still though, customers get more frustrated because it's harder to find a photo, photographers get more frustrated because their portfolio's revenue per item drops and while agencies might make the sale, their expenses increase as the number of items not selling (and the cost to maintain them) continues to grow exponentially, reducing their profitability.

For a marketplace like Envato, the tension between quantity of items and photographers earning a livable income is one we are wrestling with. We're also wrestling with the issue of customers not finding what they want.

Looked at another way, we have a growing number of photographers going after the same pie which means less for individual photographers. So while the amount of effort to create and maintain a healthy portfolio is the same, the return for that effort has been getting lower and lower as more photographers enter the industry.

So what levers does a marketplace like Envato have to be able to shift the needle so that the photographers we do have are earning a livable income in a way that keeps Envato profitable?

1. Increase the number of buyers
2. Reduce royalty rates
3. Eliminate content that doesn't sell
4. Limit the number of items a photographer can upload
5. Limit the number of photographers on the marketplace

While the first one is obvious, if the rate of new photographers coming to the platform outpaces the rate of new buyers, you have the same situation and in a highly competitive industry like stock photographry, marketshare shift is an expensive activity.

The second one is what some agencies have done, but not Envato. It's not really in our values to lower royalty rates to photographers.

We can eliminate photos that don't sell, but what if those photos are really amazing and the only reason they haven't sold is because they're buried? Does that serve customers and photographers well? We don't think so.

We can limit the number of items a photographer uploads but from a purely competitive perspective, why would we limit content uploading and give competitors the opportunity to showcase great content just because we don't 'have room' for any more photos? What guarantee is there that the photos uploaded will be the best?

 That leaves us with limiting the number of photographers on the marketplace. But how do you do that? How do you tell people you've accepted before that they're no longer able to sell with you? How do you pick and choose the photographers with the most potential to have the highest number of selling items?

There's not really an easy way to go about it. But the industry is not what it was five or ten years ago. As has been mentioned here already, the sheer number of stock photographers is exploding.

At Envato, we're committed to helping our community of authors (what we call creators) earn a livable income and for stock photography, that's meant some tough decisions in the last few months.

What we've seen is that customers are becoming more sophisticated and demanding in what they buy and rather than give them a library of photos they have to search long and hard through to find what they want, maybe we should do a bit of that curating for them and present the best we can get.

So, that's what we're trying to do. We've updated our quality guidelines to try and give photographers the information they need to understand what our customers are after (based on the data we have from them).

We're cleaning up our library. One of the hardest things we've had to do is evaluate portfolios against our updated guidelines and tell people that what was once acceptable doesn't fit where we want to be and asking them to come back with a new sample portfolio that does meet our updated guidelines.

Our goal is to create a stock photography marketplace with really high quality photos our customers love to buy and ensure that our authors are able to earn a livable income.

This wasn't going to be a pitch but now that I am here at the end of my rant, I'll open it up to you. We're not perfect. We get things wrong. We make mistakes and sometimes even make decisions that don't seem to make sense.

But our values are the same. We want photographers in our community earning a livable income. We're not competing to be the biggest agency on the backs of photographers, we're hoping to be a better marketplace for photographers.

We want to support what you're doing, give you the tools and information you need to succeed and walk alongside you as you grow a sustainable business.

If that's the kind of relationship you want, let me know. It's not going to happen overnight and there will be growing pains as we work to get there, but don't doubt our sincerity. For those of you who have ignored or left Envato in the past, take another look. Reach out. We're not going to bite and we'll do our best to honestly and sincerely support you.

Thanks,

James.

P.S.
On the original topic's point of complaining or going negative. That's easy. If you've got a negative thing to say about Envato there are tons of threads and posts and blogs around the web you can feed on. As someone who actively reads and responds here, I will say that when the conversation is constructive, it's incredibly valuable to us and other photographers. You're the experts, we lean on you to tell us what's up, but we're humans too.

The internet is an easy place to go negative without thinking of the consequences. I personally, on this forum, have had my family threatened. I don't think that's representative of this community but civil discourse where different perspectives are acknowledged goes a long way in advancing the cause.

Sorry, I'm not buying your reasons for dumping photographers.  I've been following these threads and from what I can tell, I am higher ranked and make a lot more money there monthly than the few photographers you've kept.  Im not just in the top ranks of Photodune contributors, but on all the other sites I'm on.  Which suggests my content is good. 

Here's my theory.  Many of the contributors you've cut loose are also top sellers.  Which mean we make higher royalty %.  So while you may not have directly cut royalties, dumping the people earning the highest royalty rates has the same effect.  Less money going out per sale.  Really cr@ppy way to treat your top sellers, hardest workers, and the ones who built your business.

You're welcome.

« Reply #69 on: February 17, 2017, 13:29 »
+1
People have to be more optimist. This forum look like a complain forum, people have to be more possitive. We have to concentrate in find solutions and do things better.

Shelma1

« Reply #70 on: February 17, 2017, 13:43 »
+7
So? Find a solution. Nobody's stopping you. Let us know when you've found it.

Photodune Reject

« Reply #71 on: February 17, 2017, 13:49 »
+1
No thank you I will never join again!

« Reply #72 on: February 17, 2017, 17:04 »
0
Have any of you rejects received payout yet? I understand they will pay us what they owe us. It's not much for me but I still want it.

« Reply #73 on: February 17, 2017, 17:07 »
+2
Have any of you rejects received payout yet? I understand they will pay us what they owe us. It's not much for me but I still want it.
I assume they will wait till they get round to removing our unworthy efforts mine were still hanging around spoiling the look of their brilliant collection.

« Reply #74 on: February 17, 2017, 19:50 »
0
Have any of you rejects received payout yet? I understand they will pay us what they owe us. It's not much for me but I still want it.
I assume they will wait till they get round to removing our unworthy efforts mine were still hanging around spoiling the look of their brilliant collection.

and getting sales - don't forget these unworthy images still sell every once in a while - they might as well wait for all the sales to happen before they send us the final $...


 

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