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Author Topic: Stop Complaining  (Read 10210 times)

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« Reply #100 on: April 15, 2017, 14:53 »
+4
You happy campers who are content to eat as much merde as the agencies dish out are the reason they get away with treating contributors so badly.

I thought the agencies were the reason your livelihood is threatened. Now it's me?  :) That's kinda sad. You should pay more attention to your neighbor's cat, it might be plotting something.  8)

Yeah, it is sad.  But no inconsistency there.  Many agencies ARE treating contributors badly and they get away with it because of the many contributors who are willing to happily accept it.  I didn't single you out, but if you recognized yourself in my comment thats on you.

Oh, and I care for my neighbor's cat when they go away on vacation or for work, so I think the cat and I are on pretty good terms.  ;D


« Reply #101 on: May 16, 2017, 21:30 »
+3

3.    No matter how hard I try I cannot improve my sells- dont you realize that just maybe you dont have the talent required for this business.


Here's a complaint of mine - people who use the verb "sell" as if it was a noun. The correct wording would be: "I cannot improve my sales."

« Reply #102 on: May 17, 2017, 01:22 »
+4

3.    No matter how hard I try I cannot improve my sells- dont you realize that just maybe you dont have the talent required for this business.


Here's a complaint of mine - people who use the verb "sell" as if it was a noun. The correct wording would be: "I cannot improve my sales."
A lot of contributors here don't have English as their first language cut them some slack ;-).

« Reply #103 on: May 17, 2017, 01:30 »
0

A lot of contributors here don't have English as their first language cut them some slack ;-).

Very true. Will do. Though I have noticed on some other microstock forums that some native English users make the same "mistake" (just an observation.)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 02:09 by dragonblade »

« Reply #104 on: May 17, 2017, 01:51 »
+1

A lot of contributors here don't have English as their first language cut them some slack ;-).

Very true. Will do. Though I have noticed on some other microstock forms that some native English users make the same "mistake" (just an observation.)
Very probably...the quality of English on Facebook from English speakers is often appalling. I tend to let it pass unless they are saying how clever they are ;-).

« Reply #105 on: May 17, 2017, 05:40 »
+1
We aren't all english experts.  It was a subject I hated in school, I'm sure that's the same for a lot of photographers.  If you want to correct peoples english, go to a forum where they want that.  I see no need for it here at all.  Maybe we should all do a geography test and see who's bad at that :)

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #106 on: May 17, 2017, 05:50 »
+1

A lot of contributors here don't have English as their first language cut them some slack ;-).

Very true. Will do. Though I have noticed on some other microstock forums that some native English users make the same "mistake" (just an observation.)

How do you know they are native English speakers?
Just because someone lives in England doesn't mean they're 'native English speakers'.

« Reply #107 on: May 17, 2017, 06:05 »
0

How do you know they are native English speakers?

Just an assumption of mine based on their country of residency and their overall level of written English. Their grammar and spelling were pretty much perfect except for their habit of referring to "sells" rather than "sales." Of course my assumptions may be wrong. They may well be non-native English speakers who have migrated to an English speaking country.


Just because someone lives in England doesn't mean they're 'native English speakers'.

I wasn't referring specifically to people living in England. I was referring to individuals living in a number of so-called 'inner circle' countries.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 06:15 by dragonblade »

ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #108 on: May 17, 2017, 06:30 »
0

How do you know they are native English speakers?

Just an assumption of mine based on their country of residency and their overall level of written English. Their grammar and spelling were pretty much perfect except for their habit of referring to "sells" rather than "sales." Of course my assumptions may be wrong. They may well be non-native English speakers who have migrated to an English speaking country.


Just because someone lives in England doesn't mean they're 'native English speakers'.

I wasn't referring specifically to people living in England. I was referring to individuals living in a number of so-called 'inner circle' countries.

I've never heard the term 'inner circle' countries. But my reference to England specifically was to imply the assumption you admitted you'd made above.
My typos are so bad, I can't throw stones; but some phrases still really get to me like 'I could care less' when they mean, "I couldn't care less" as discussed on here a while back. I can't remember who kindly pointed me to this clip on that subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om7O0MFkmpw
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 16:22 by ShadySue »

« Reply #109 on: May 17, 2017, 07:04 »
0

I've never heard the term 'inner circle' countries.

It's a means of categorisation developed by the linguist Braj Kachru in dividing the globe into convenient sectors according to the degree of English usage. For example the 'inner circle countries' are countries where the dominant (or first) language is English - eg Australia, New Zealand, US, Canada, England. The 'outer circle countries' are nations in which many were English colonies and so English plays a major role in some aspects of peoples lives (government use, educational use) - eg Singapore, the Philippines, South Africa, India, Pakistan. The 'expanding circle countries' are ones where English is regarded as a foreign language - eg Japan, Korea, Russia, China, most of Europe.

I can't remember who kindlyh pointed me to this clip on that subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om7O0MFkmpw

That was quite amusing. Good educational value too.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 11:13 by dragonblade »

« Reply #110 on: May 17, 2017, 08:34 »
0

How do you know they are native English speakers?


Just an assumption of mine based on their country of residency and their overall level of written English. Their grammar and spelling were pretty much perfect except for their habit of referring to "sells" rather than "sales." Of course my assumptions may be wrong. They may well be non-native English speakers who have migrated to an English speaking country.


Just because someone lives in England doesn't mean they're 'native English speakers'.


I wasn't referring specifically to people living in England. I was referring to individuals living in a number of so-called 'inner circle' countries.


I've never heard the term 'inner circle' countries. But my reference to England specifically was to infer the assumption you admitted you'd made above.
My typos are so bad, I can't throw stones; but some phrases still really get to me like 'I could care less' when they mean, "I couldn't care less" as discussed on here a while back. I can't remember who kindlyh pointed me to this clip on that subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om7O0MFkmpw
I think that might of been me but it also highlights how pompous some people can get over language.  I could just as easily pointed this link out instead http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/03/18/why_i_could_care_less_is_not_as_irrational_or_ungrammatical_as_you_might.html

« Reply #111 on: May 17, 2017, 10:16 »
0

I've never heard the term 'inner circle' countries.

It's a means of categorisation developed by the linguist Braj Kachru in dividing the globe into convenient sectors according to the degree of English usage. For example the 'inner circle countries' are countries where the dominant (or first) language is English - eg Australia, New Zealand, US, Canada, England. The 'outer circle countries' are nations in which many were English colonies and so English plays a major role in some aspects of peoples lives (government use, educational use) - eg Singapore, the Philippines, South Africa, India, Pakistan. The 'expanding circle countries' are ones where English is regarded as a foreign language - eg Japan, Korea, Russia, China, most of Europe.


If you were born and raised in Canada, English is not necessarily your mother tongue. You could very well not speak it at all, because Canada is an officially bilingual country, the second official language being French.

By the way, English is not my native language, I only started learning it at about 30 yo. Is it obvious? I would not confuse "sell" with "sale", but I do make silly mistakes, and I am often made "good natured" fun of by people who think being fluent in a second language is easy. Those are typically people who do not have an experience of speaking a foreign language with natives. It is, of course, understandable, people only understand well what they experience first hand.

« Reply #112 on: May 17, 2017, 11:07 »
0
If you were born and raised in Canada, English is not necessarily your mother tongue. You could very well not speak it at all, because Canada is an officially bilingual country, the second official language being French.


Good point. I visited Canada a number of years ago. I remember travelling on a train there from BC to Alberta and an onboard announcement being made in both French and English. Plus I thought it was interesting how a lot of products being sold in shops had both French and English text.


By the way, English is not my native language, I only started learning it at about 30 yo. Is it obvious?

Not obvious at all. Sounds like you have a degree of competency in the language.

Those are typically people who do not have an experience of speaking a foreign language with natives. It is, of course, understandable, people only understand well what they experience first hand.

I'm learning Korean at the moment. Occasionally, I practise my Korean with the staff of Korean snack shops and restaurants when ordering food. Sometimes they understand me but other times they don't - likely due to my pronunciation.

« Reply #113 on: May 17, 2017, 20:06 »
0

I'm learning Korean at the moment. Occasionally, I practise my Korean with the staff of Korean snack shops and restaurants when ordering food. Sometimes they understand me but other times they don't - likely due to my pronunciation.

I am sure there is also the element of surprise to it. If you don't look Korean, not expected to speak Korean, you are not likely to be understood. They will probably wonder what what you said means in English  :)

« Reply #114 on: May 17, 2017, 21:44 »
0
We aren't all english experts.  It was a subject I hated in school, I'm sure that's the same for a lot of photographers. 

No, it was my favorite subject at school! As a matter of fact, in one year, I was the best at my school. English was probably the only good thing that I learned at that stupid school. But I didn't grow up in an English-speaking country nor am I a native speaker.

I don't mind people making mistakes, but one thing does irritate me: when native speakers don't understand the difference and confuse "you're" with "your" and "there" with "they're" or "their". People who have learned English as a foreign language usually don't make such mistakes.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2017, 21:48 by LDV81 »

« Reply #115 on: May 17, 2017, 22:14 »
+5
We aren't all english experts.  It was a subject I hated in school, I'm sure that's the same for a lot of photographers. 

No, it was my favorite subject at school! As a matter of fact, in one year, I was the best at my school. English was probably the only good thing that I learned at that stupid school. But I didn't grow up in an English-speaking country nor am I a native speaker.

I don't mind people making mistakes, but one thing does irritate me: when native speakers don't understand the difference and confuse "you're" with "your" and "there" with "they're" or "their". People who have learned English as a foreign language usually don't make such mistakes.

Your write. Its a loosing battle trying to correct there spelling.

« Reply #116 on: May 18, 2017, 03:32 »
0

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« Reply #117 on: May 18, 2017, 05:35 »
+1
By the way, English is not my native language, I only started learning it at about 30 yo. Is it obvious?

Depends if you're currently 31 yo or 91 yo! 😉

« Reply #118 on: May 18, 2017, 07:51 »
+3

I've never heard the term 'inner circle' countries.

It's a means of categorisation developed by the linguist Braj Kachru in dividing the globe into convenient sectors according to the degree of English usage. For example the 'inner circle countries' are countries where the dominant (or first) language is English - eg Australia, New Zealand, US, Canada, England. The 'outer circle countries' are nations in which many were English colonies and so English plays a major role in some aspects of peoples lives (government use, educational use) - eg Singapore, the Philippines, South Africa, India, Pakistan. The 'expanding circle countries' are ones where English is regarded as a foreign language - eg Japan, Korea, Russia, China, most of Europe.

I can't remember who kindlyh pointed me to this clip on that subject:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=om7O0MFkmpw

That was quite amusing. Good educational value to.

I wouldn't normally correct anyone on a forum but too meaning also has a double 'o'. Sorry, just couldn't help myself 😂😂😂

« Reply #119 on: May 18, 2017, 08:48 »
0
By the way, English is not my native language, I only started learning it at about 30 yo. Is it obvious?

Depends if you're currently 31 yo or 91 yo! 😉

Haha, not 91 yet, but not a spring chicken either.  ;)

« Reply #120 on: May 18, 2017, 11:13 »
0
I wouldn't normally correct anyone on a forum but too meaning also has a double 'o'. Sorry, just couldn't help myself 😂😂😂

Well spotted! Yes, I am well aware of that 'double o' rule (a silly unintentional typo on my part.) Just goes to show we all make mistakes.

« Reply #121 on: May 18, 2017, 12:38 »
+2
I think that might of been me but it also highlights how pompous some people can get over language.  I could just as easily pointed this link out instead http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/03/18/why_i_could_care_less_is_not_as_irrational_or_ungrammatical_as_you_might.html


I see that one all of the time. It should be "I think that might HAVE been me".  ;D

Remember, even native English speakers might not have ( or might not of) excelled in English.

One thing I do when typing on my computer, in posts, is to not bother with apostrophes. Especially on my ipad. So don't is frequently dont. I know better, just too lazy to type it, especially if i have to go to another keyboard screen.

« Reply #122 on: May 18, 2017, 14:12 »
+1
I think that might of been me but it also highlights how pompous some people can get over language.  I could just as easily pointed this link out instead http://www.slate.com/blogs/lexicon_valley/2014/03/18/why_i_could_care_less_is_not_as_irrational_or_ungrammatical_as_you_might.html


I see that one all of the time. It should be "I think that might HAVE been me".  ;D

Remember, even native English speakers might not have ( or might not of) excelled in English.

One thing I do when typing on my computer, in posts, is to not bother with apostrophes. Especially on my ipad. So don't is frequently dont. I know better, just too lazy to type it, especially if i have to go to another keyboard screen.
Like I said before, I don't care.  I like not being good at english, even if I try really hard to remember all the pathetic rules, my brain doesn't retain them and I'm really pleased about that because there are much more important things in life.  I also failed religious education in school and I'm not bothered about that either :)

« Reply #123 on: May 18, 2017, 14:16 »
0
Like I said before, I don't care.  I like not being good at english, even if I try really hard to remember all the pathetic rules, my brain doesn't retain them and I'm really pleased about that because there are much more important things in life.  I also failed religious education in school and I'm not bothered about that either :)

That's OK if you don't care...maybe someone trying to better their language skills does.  :)
"I also failed religious education in school and I'm not bothered about that either". I am with you on that one, though we didn't even have religious education in school. (Separation of church and state)


 

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