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Author Topic: Coffee pics, only natural light - critique request  (Read 2029 times)

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Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« on: March 22, 2017, 08:58 »
+1
Hey all,

These were taken with 100% natural light, at a cafe.

Critique would be appreciated, including post.

Thanks

Brasilnut


Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2017, 08:59 »
0
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Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2017, 08:59 »
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Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2017, 09:00 »
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2017, 02:27 »
+2
My thought is just that there must be so many like this on the other hand I guess production costs were just for the coffee

« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2017, 05:06 »
+3
Hi BN

To me, the cups look very blue/grey, and the coffee looks very yellow.

Did you apply a "Hollywood Blockbuster Movie Teal and Orange" filter?  ;)

Can't tell how sharp they are, but other than that, submit and see. I've sold a few tea/coffee shots, and if you were there anyway, and drank the coffee, then as Paul says it didn't cost you anything!

Gary

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2017, 06:04 »
0
Quote
To me, the cups look very blue/grey, and the coffee looks very yellow.

Did you apply a "Hollywood Blockbuster Movie Teal and Orange" filter?  ;)

Can't tell how sharp they are, but other than that, submit and see. I've sold a few tea/coffee shots, and if you were there anyway, and drank the coffee, then as Paul says it didn't cost you anything!

Yea, it was a 5 minute $2 job :D

Perhaps it's too orange / saturated. I'm new when it comes to still life.

As for sharpness it's fine, just quite a bit of grain as it was shot at ISO 4000.

« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2017, 06:28 »
+1
Quote
To me, the cups look very blue/grey, and the coffee looks very yellow.

Did you apply a "Hollywood Blockbuster Movie Teal and Orange" filter?  ;)

Can't tell how sharp they are, but other than that, submit and see. I've sold a few tea/coffee shots, and if you were there anyway, and drank the coffee, then as Paul says it didn't cost you anything!

Yea, it was a 5 minute $2 job :D

Perhaps it's too orange / saturated. I'm new when it comes to still life.

As for sharpness it's fine, just quite a bit of grain as it was shot at ISO 4000.
I'd be interested to know if it gets through at that asa. I have a Nikon D7000 and struggle to get much through above 400. Though to be fair I haven't tried much lately.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2017, 06:36 »
0
Quote
I'd be interested to know if it gets through at that asa. I have a Nikon D7000 and struggle to get much through above 400. Though to be fair I haven't tried much lately.

The one with the barista didn't get through for noise/grain rejection but I've since resubmitted with more noise reduction. The rest got through OK.

I'm using a Nikon D800 and it's quite impressive, even at higher ISO.

« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2017, 06:56 »
+1
Quote
I'd be interested to know if it gets through at that asa. I have a Nikon D7000 and struggle to get much through above 400. Though to be fair I haven't tried much lately.

The one with the barista didn't get through for noise/grain rejection but I've since resubmitted with more noise reduction. The rest got through OK.

I'm using a Nikon D800 and it's quite impressive, even at higher ISO.
Yep quite a step up from mine I'm guessing being full frame is a bit benefit noise wise

angelawaye

  • Eat, Sleep, Keyword. Repeat

« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2017, 07:04 »
+3
ISO 4000 is very high. If I have to go over 1000 use a tripod and timer instead of increasing the ISO.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 10:13 by angelawaye »

« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2017, 07:22 »
+1
ISO 4000 is very high. If I have to go over 1000 I use a tripod and timer.

Usually, yes, but ISO values are not absolute, it depends on the camera. ISO 6400 on the a7S II is not that high but astronomic on an m43 sensor.

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2017, 08:26 »
0
This is tough. Might try some negative clarity and further NR. Wouldn't be surprised if I get hit with a focus rejection but worth a try...

« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2017, 09:35 »
+4
For stock photos, I never shoot over ISO 800, there is simply too many rejections for noise.  For personal use or personal projects I'm happy to shoot at ISO 12800.. but for stock that will never fly.

Try shrinking the images to 6mp. 

« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2017, 09:41 »
+1
i dont like the composition on most of them

« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2017, 10:59 »
+1
Hey all,

These were taken with 100% natural light, at a cafe.

Critique would be appreciated, including post.

Thanks

Brasilnut

in all there are little flaw..like the cup not perfectly centered on the plate, or lack of negative space to add text, light is pretty flat. if you want do this seriously you need equipment control of light. these are snapshot and micro stock is full of this. if you want use natural light u need big bright window. post processing can't do anything if the raw is flat.

« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2017, 11:09 »
0
Quote
I'd be interested to know if it gets through at that asa. I have a Nikon D7000 and struggle to get much through above 400. Though to be fair I haven't tried much lately.

The one with the barista didn't get through for noise/grain rejection but I've since resubmitted with more noise reduction. The rest got through OK.

I'm using a Nikon D800 and it's quite impressive, even at higher ISO.
Yep quite a step up from mine I'm guessing being full frame is a bit benefit noise wise
Yup, I noticed a huge difference in noise when I went to full frame.  It was great!  I still like my crop sensor for "getting closer" to pictures at events, etc, though

« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2017, 11:13 »
0
Hey all,

These were taken with 100% natural light, at a cafe.

Critique would be appreciated, including post.

Thanks

Brasilnut
They don't make me want to drink the coffee,which is important.  It just seems a bit flat and the colors a bit off.  It would be nice to see some steam wafting up and maybe a little brighter and less saturated.  Since most of them got accepted, though-see if they sell.  It's what the customers like that matters. 

« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2017, 11:14 »
0
Hey all,

These were taken with 100% natural light, at a cafe.

Critique would be appreciated, including post.

Thanks

Brasilnut
They don't make me want to drink the coffee,which is important.  It just seems a bit flat and the colors a bit off.  It would be nice to see some steam wafting up and maybe a little brighter.  Since most of them got accepted, though-see if they sell.  It's what the customers like that matters.

« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2017, 11:14 »
0
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Hi Brasilnut
You should use a tripod, for stock. With this kind of images where i have control i use ISO 100. Remember this images have to be with not noise or minimum noise.
What's the name of that wood you use?

« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2017, 11:26 »
0
"I still like my crop sensor for "getting closer" to pictures at events, etc, though"

thats funny, because you can do the same with a full frame camera and just crop the photo, unless you use a 18mp crop sensor and need the full resolution image, then i can see the point

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2017, 11:35 »
0
Thanks everybody for your comments. As it's a public cafe, not sure they would be happy to see me with a tripod there but doesn't hurt to ask...

Let's see how these do, no harm in re-shooting another time.

Quote
What's the name of that wood you use?

Not sure, but the texture is interesting. Perhaps oak.


« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2017, 11:41 »
0
Maybe you can go there first thing in the morning before many customers arrive if you want to use a tripod.

« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2017, 13:46 »
0
Thanks everybody for your comments. As it's a public cafe, not sure they would be happy to see me with a tripod there but doesn't hurt to ask...

Let's see how these do, no harm in re-shooting another time.

Quote
What's the name of that wood you use?

Not sure, but the texture is interesting. Perhaps oak.
You might get away with a gorilla pod IF you can keep it steady or bean bag!

« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2017, 16:58 »
0
"I still like my crop sensor for "getting closer" to pictures at events, etc, though"

thats funny, because you can do the same with a full frame camera and just crop the photo, unless you use a 18mp crop sensor and need the full resolution image, then i can see the point
I like to have a full resolution picture when I can.  Some of the events I shoot I have to be pretty far away from the stage and even crop for composition on my 7d.  With the full-frame and my 70-200, the subject might be microscopic. I have an extender, but hate to use it if I can avoid it.

I see your point, though. 


 

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