MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: Failed my first 4 images on Alamy. Please tell me what I did wrong.  (Read 1775 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: May 19, 2016, 21:15 »
0
Wow I now feel even more horrible after reading posts where people dont fail the QC often and on my first outing starting out all 4 of my photos fail (also the fact that Alamy says "70% of first submissions pass"). Thats a huge blow to my self-confidence as a budding photographer and I was hoping that anyone could help and tell me why my photos failed. I guess I just dont know what to look for when checking my images. I did look a the QC failed reasons on their website, but that didnt help.

So the first image (DSC05035) got a interpolation artifacts and compression artefacts reason. The second and third image (DSC06342 & DSC04525) got a compression artefacts reason. The last image (DSC05062) got a interpolation artifacts reason. I want to learn from my mistakes and create great photos, so I hope everyone can help me out.

newbielink:https://www.flickr.com/photos/137754526@N08/albums/72157668285591172 [nonactive]

These are some of my questions about the said photos.

 Im not very good at understanding technology but I was under the impression that compression meant that your file has been shrunk down for size. All of my files go straight from the camera into Lightroom, so I dont understand how my images were "compressed". The second critique, interpolation artifacts, is something I just dont understand in general. What I mean when I say that is when I looked in the QC failure reasons I dont understand what it is trying to tell to me, so I dont know what I did wrong. Is there a better example someone could give for this?




« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 21:52 »
0
Here is a very educational site that you may findhelpful:

Cambridgeincolour.com

« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2016, 21:56 »
0
what settings are you using when saving (exporting the files)?

Probably those artifacts are created when saving it in lower quality jpeg (compression), if you saved it over and over again it would be like taking a photocopy of a photocopy, or when you enlarge/upsize the file which could create interpolation artifacts.
see if this helps https://photographylife.com/jpeg-compression-levels-in-photoshop-and-lightroom

« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2016, 22:35 »
0
I shoot in RAW and from the camera I transfer to a file folder. From there I import the file into Lightroom. Once I finish my editing I export it to a new file folder that turns it into a JPG.

« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2016, 01:36 »
+3
Personally, I would go back and shoot four new photos which have less challenging light situations. You do not need to produce startlingly magnificent images for your first four submissions, just a variety of images which are technically correct and can demonstrate you have a grasp of how a professional camera works. Your present collection would present challenges to even an experienced photog.

« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2016, 01:40 »
0
Which camera are you using? You need to save photos highest quality JPEG. I get that rejection reason when I used noise reduction too much. I shoot wih ISO 80 setting but my camera loves to upset me with lots of noise. Too much noise removal leaves artifacts. I am very thinking of buying a better camera even though mine wasn't cheap at all.

« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2016, 06:25 »
+1
So the first image (DSC05035) got a interpolation artifacts and compression artefacts reason. The second and third image (DSC06342 & DSC04525) got a compression artefacts reason. The last image (DSC05062) got a interpolation artifacts reason. I want to learn from my mistakes and create great photos, so I hope everyone can help me out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/137754526@N08/albums/72157668285591172

These are some of my questions about the said photos.

 Im not very good at understanding technology but I was under the impression that compression meant that your file has been shrunk down for size. All of my files go straight from the camera into Lightroom, so I dont understand how my images were "compressed". The second critique, interpolation artifacts, is something I just dont understand in general. What I mean when I say that is when I looked in the QC failure reasons I dont understand what it is trying to tell to me, so I dont know what I did wrong. Is there a better example someone could give for this?

If we are talking about artefacts, those are most likely only showing in the 100% resolution of the images. So there is not much use at looking at a downscaled version on Flickr to give specific help. So maybe consider posting a 100% resolution somewhere (with a watermark in the center or something...) and give a link again.

However, in general, landscapes are not known to sell really well. The images may look beautiful but it's not really what agencies are looking for. With the exception of the fox in the tree, your images don't look like they have high sales potential, so reviewers are very likely to look much more closely to this kind of images than they would at a people shot with a good concept. So I would really consider other subject matter when applying to any agency these days.

On the technical side I do see what I think is heavy purple fringing in the fox image (where the branches are going through some bright sky). And in image number 4 it looks a bit like you couldn't make up your mind - it has some motion blur but it's not really a long exposure. This might not be ideal as well.

« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2016, 06:52 »
0
I don't have anything to add as far as technical issues, other than what has already been said above, but...nice photos!

« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2016, 06:59 »
0
As MJF says, we really need to be able to see full sized images,  preferably with intact exif data to make any meaningful comment. Watermark any images you do put online.


Compression artifacts are caused by software compression used to make the file smaller in "lossy" file types like jpeg. The problem is cumulative if you are re-saving as jpeg during working on a file. You should save as the native format of the software you are using or a non lossy format like TIFF when working on files. Only save as jpeg once when you export the image at the end of your workflow. (which I've just seen has already been said!  :) )
Too much sharpening (Alamy don't like sharpening) and generally "pulling the image around" too much in conversion by adding too much contrast and saturation will also give artifacts.
Interpolation artifacts are caused by upsizing.


Again I'd agree with the others that you are choosing difficult light conditions for a first submission. They should be very different types of subject as well IMHO. As is often said, a landscape, a portrait of a person, a still life. . . 





« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2016, 08:09 »
+1
I guess I just dont know what to look for when checking my images.

That is definitely it - you will sort that out in time.

As others said, it's impossible to know for certain without looking at 100%, but I could clearly see noise and posterization in the sky on a couple of those images even without it.  Noise could maybe be fixed with a noise-reduction program, but it's better to avoid that if possible, especially on first submissions, and it might make posterization (the banding in the sky) worse.  Once you get used to seeing noise and artifacts you will find them everywhere, but it may take a little while to train your eyes.  Alamy is very tough about noise, fringing and other artifacts - I got nailed once because I forgot to correct purple fringing in one image of a batch and that is the one they looked at.  Posterization is especially obvious and will never fly.  Don't bother with low-light images for your initial four and be careful about posterization with blue skies.  Good luck!

« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2016, 18:49 »
0
Thanks everyone for all of the critiquing. I know stock photo sites don't prefer landscape but I don't like portrait photography and just want to do it fun fun at this point. I was wondering if the photos I posted on flickr would be 100% but I guess I was wrong. Like I said on the digital side of photography, technology just confuses me, so can someone tell me how I can upload a 100% version onto flickr. 
« Last Edit: May 20, 2016, 19:07 by Letty »


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
13 Replies
3369 Views
Last post March 08, 2010, 11:42
by Gannet77
20 Replies
11039 Views
Last post May 24, 2010, 00:21
by Danybot
54 Replies
22502 Views
Last post July 10, 2012, 15:16
by Freedom
3 Replies
1055 Views
Last post May 26, 2012, 01:47
by ShadySue
23 Replies
2497 Views
Last post February 11, 2015, 17:27
by Rinderart

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors