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Author Topic: Is this photo appropriate for Istock's 3rd application sample?  (Read 4134 times)

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« on: October 03, 2011, 12:19 »
0
Hello,

2 of my images are approved by Istock but my 3rd image has failed twice.I was asked to wait a week and tomorrow would be uploading 3rd sample.

Could you tell me please if this pic is appropriate and would pass or not?I don't want to take any risk with them this time...

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/42878955/IS.jpg

Thank you.. :)


« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2011, 12:45 »
0
No.  It isn't in focus, areas are blown out, you've got chromatic aberration and the white balance looks off to me.

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2011, 12:46 »
0
nice composition, but not sharp enough. you have some chromatic abberation (just a little, blue fringing). and it is a little boring and flat. I wouldn't use it for an application photo. would also be helpful if you were to show us the other application photos you plan on uploading, since they like to see a variety.

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2011, 12:46 »
0
lol, Sean beat me to it. but you get the point, good luck ;-)

« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2011, 12:56 »
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No chance even if I fix CA?
2 of my other pics are already approved.I only need to upload 1.

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2011, 13:01 »
0
sorry, I don't think it is worthy. I'd say no chance, but that's just me

red

« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2011, 13:03 »
0
Made me change my glasses, twice. Out of focus.

« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2011, 13:06 »
0
No chance even if I fix CA?
2 of my other pics are already approved.I only need to upload 1.

If you're desperate enough to not have anything better than this, I'd say you're not really in a position to join up right now anyways.  Sorry.

« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2011, 13:18 »
0
Haha, okay I am not submitting this.I have other pics but just was considering this one.
It is better to get a 'no' from people who help here than from istock. :)

Okay, regarding focus, I would like to ask something as I am new to photography.
When I choose f/22 or f/32 to get everything in focus, there are still some soft areas as in this image.So I decided to catch this image with auto-settings so that I could get more focus points.

But how do you get everything in sharp focus in a shot like this?With aperture priority f/22?If yes, where would you set that focus point in an image like this ?How to get everything in sharp focus?Many said it was out of focus so what could I do next time in the camera when I want to keep everything in sharp focus?
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 13:20 by kiratsinhjadeja »

« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2011, 13:45 »
0
Haha, okay I am not submitting this.I have other pics but just was considering this one.
It is better to get a 'no' from people who help here than from istock. :)

Okay, regarding focus, I would like to ask something as I am new to photography.
When I choose f/22 or f/32 to get everything in focus, there are still some soft areas as in this image.So I decided to catch this image with auto-settings so that I could get more focus points.

But how do you get everything in sharp focus in a shot like this?With aperture priority f/22?If yes, where would you set that focus point in an image like this ?How to get everything in sharp focus?Many said it was out of focus so what could I do next time in the camera when I want to keep everything in sharp focus?

Hi.

It is probably better to use f/11 or around there, because diffraction will make your image more and more soft as you choose f/13, f/16, etc.

You should try and find a program or a table that lets you calculate the depth of field for given aperture, focal length, and distance to subject. Then you will see, that you may not need f/22 or f/32 at all. It is also good to have a feeling about these numbers relationship in the future.

Best regards
Morten

« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2011, 14:00 »
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Here is a depth of field calculator website:

http://dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

red

« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2011, 14:21 »
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For something this large I often take several pics with different focus points and combine the images in photoshop. Lots of work but sometimes worth the effort. I used to shoot lots of product photos and the buyers always wanted everything in focus, even when items were grouped. It was easier to take several shots with the camera locked on a boom and combine the shots. An outside shot would require a sturdy tripod.

SNP

  • Canadian Photographer
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2011, 17:40 »
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Here is a depth of field calculator website:

http://dofmaster.com/dofjs.html


COOL website...thanks

« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2011, 18:07 »
0
agree on current critiques, apart from that you have done this picture with the sun in your front, you "should" shoot when you got the sun behind, even if it means get earlier or later to make the picture :)

« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2011, 21:23 »
0
For something this large I often take several pics with different focus points and combine the images in photoshop. Lots of work but sometimes worth the effort. I used to shoot lots of product photos and the buyers always wanted everything in focus, even when items were grouped. It was easier to take several shots with the camera locked on a boom and combine the shots. An outside shot would require a sturdy tripod.

Okay thank you everyone!That was really a cool website.But cuppacofee, do you mean focus stacking?
And how about f/8?One guy on alamy recommended me f/8 for another picture that had similar problems.

« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2011, 22:00 »
0
No chance even if I fix CA?
2 of my other pics are already approved.I only need to upload 1.

Yes out of focus you clearly cannot do anything about it except take the picture again :(

red

« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2011, 00:00 »
0
Yes, focus stacking is the fancy term. It's easier for some shots than others. I take multiple shots, focusing on different areas of the object or scene. This gives me a series of the same images with different areas in focus. Then I layer them in Photoshop and remove the blurry areas on the different layers leaving the sharp spots visible. Then I merge the layers which results in a totally in-focus shot (composite), no matter the depth of field. Yes, it sounds like a lot of work but I've been working in Photoshop since it was invented so this method is easier and believe it or not faster (for me) than trying to get everything focused in one shot. Again, it depends on a really sturdy tripod, or boom, and controlled lighting. Some perspective adjustments may be needed on some layers if you have to move the camera slightly to get better focus on a particularly pesky area but that is usually minimal.

« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2011, 09:23 »
0
Yes, focus stacking is the fancy term. It's easier for some shots than others. I take multiple shots, focusing on different areas of the object or scene. This gives me a series of the same images with different areas in focus. Then I layer them in Photoshop and remove the blurry areas on the different layers leaving the sharp spots visible. Then I merge the layers which results in a totally in-focus shot (composite), no matter the depth of field. Yes, it sounds like a lot of work but I've been working in Photoshop since it was invented so this method is easier and believe it or not faster (for me) than trying to get everything focused in one shot. Again, it depends on a really sturdy tripod, or boom, and controlled lighting. Some perspective adjustments may be needed on some layers if you have to move the camera slightly to get better focus on a particularly pesky area but that is usually minimal.

Thanks for the tip, I love learning new things and I do have a lot to learn :). I did bracketing for different exposure and played with it in Photoshop but I never though about doing it with focus ;) I like that :)

« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2011, 12:02 »
0
I had read about focus stacking previously, but I must say 1 thing and that is focus stacking means alot of intelligent masking in photoshop if I am not wrong.

By the way guys thanks to you all for saving me.I uploaded another image and was approved yesterday.My 1st image is under inspection currently.Thank you!

« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2011, 12:39 »
0
I had read about focus stacking previously, but I must say 1 thing and that is focus stacking means alot of intelligent masking in photoshop if I am not wrong.

By the way guys thanks to you all for saving me.I uploaded another image and was approved yesterday.My 1st image is under inspection currently.Thank you!

Congratulations :-)


 

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