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Author Topic: what do you think of this photo?  (Read 9776 times)

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« Reply #25 on: August 21, 2015, 21:47 »
+7
Dear 4seasons
This session is called photo critique and not photo ofense. I am shure i will improve but not thanks  to someone like you. I do no think people are waisting their time trying to help me. They really helped me think which should be my next steps. I understand you have issues with beginers but try to be a litle more polite next time.
See you in a few photos.
And, by the way, I am a she, no a he.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2015, 22:07 by micsmt »


« Reply #26 on: August 22, 2015, 04:32 »
+6
So don't waste others time and do some homework himself. Browse forums, read books and magazines, check 10 agencies best sellers, check 100 best photographers portfolios, practice with your camera- do 10000 shots and examine them. Then after two months of hard work come here and show your photos. Such is my advice.

You wasted your time, good advices ;)

« Reply #27 on: August 22, 2015, 04:47 »
+7
Dear 4seasons
This session is called photo critique and not photo ofense. I am shure i will improve but not thanks  to someone like you. I do no think people are waisting their time trying to help me. They really helped me think which should be my next steps. I understand you have issues with beginers but try to be a litle more polite next time.
See you in a few photos.
And, by the way, I am a she, no a he.

Dear micsmt,
I'm very very sorry if I was too harsh. Please forgive me.

Now, with all respect to You, I would like kindly shortly repeat:

1. Your photos are trash.
2. You have no understanding about stock photography.
3. You have no self-criticism.
4. You should do your homework from the very basic first. A lot of homework.
5. There is no beginning point from where I could start critique your photos, because they are below critique.
6. Do your homework.
7. Do your homework.

All the best to you!!

Respectfully,
4Seasons

« Reply #28 on: August 22, 2015, 07:08 »
+3


Im from Brasil, can you give me tips of what kind of photos from here are comercialy viable? Regional dishes? Large plantations? Nature?

Maybe the plantations. Brazil is known for Rio, MMA (BJJ & Capoeira), travel, the beautiful women, football, samba, dance, the slums of Brazil, etc.
There's enough there for a whole portfolio.


Thanks for the tips, Ill practice a little more and hope to bring better pictures in the future...
Seriously, and not trying to put you down. At present you are not "a photographer" (whatever that is!) It's not as simple as "practising a little more" you really need to start with the basics. There are plenty of books, and / or resources on the web that you can use. Don't ignore the basic stuff. My advice FWIW, is to set your camera on fully manual exposure mode, ("M" on the dial usually) spot exposure metering, single point focus, ISO 100. Disable the flash if you have one fitted.
That will mean that just the subject is being metered for exposure. You will have to set the aperture, and then alter the shutter speed to suit. (or vice versa). The focus will at least stand a chance of being where you want it, rather than where the camera decides it should be. Once you have metered the subject with the camera, and set the exposure, you can half press the shutter release with the focus point where you want it, and "recompose" to put the subject where you want it in the frame. 
Read up about composition, try to understand that a photograph needs an actual subject, and then go and take some photographs with the camera set like that. Take something like a still life, a portrait of a pet or person, and a landscape. Try to shoot them in good even light. Try to actually look at what you are shooting through the viewfinder. Don't cut off bits that matter.
Then come back with your shots and you'll get help if you're serious about learning.
 


ShadySue

  • There is a crack in everything
« Reply #29 on: August 22, 2015, 07:13 »
+3
OK, consider this.
Imagine I have a hob, a grill and a pot.
I decide I can open a restaurant before I've even learned to get the scrambled eggs and toast to be perfect at the same time.

A lot of people recently seem to be doing the same thing with microstock.
There's a person who uploaded 8831 files to iStock, starting in 2013 and has fewer than 30 downloads, about half of his sales being cheap subs.
He also seems to be based in South America, but his files are technically better than yours, in general.

There is NO point in getting loads of acceptances on iStock if they don't sell.

Go back to basics and learn how your camera works and how to compose.
Whatever way works best for you: take a class, join a club, buy books or magazines.
If you learn best online, I recommend John Greengo's Fundamentals of Photography 2015 class at Creative Live.
Loads of other classes on photography and Photoshop at Creative Live and on Lynda.com (a subscription site which allows access to all their classes, but you can often get a month's free trial).
For free, there are some useful articles at the New York Institute of Photography and no doubt many other places.

Give yourself lots of time to learn the basics.
Then, and only then, think about stock photography and what buyers want.

You've already had lots of great advice in this thread.
There are presumably plenty of other sites more geared towards starting photographers. However, beware of any which simply coo "Lovely, like, fave" - you'll learn nothing without strong criticism.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2015, 08:21 by ShadySue »

« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2015, 07:29 »
+2
OK, consider this.
Imagine I have a hob, a grill and a pot.
I decide I can open a restaurant before I've even learned to get the scambled eggs and toast to be perfect at the same time.

A lot of people recently seem to be doing the same thing with microstock.
There's a person who uploaded 8831 files to iStock, starting in 2013 and has fewer than 30 downloads, about half of his sales being cheap subs.
His files are technically better than yours, in general.

There is NO point in getting loads of acceptances on iStock if they don't sell.

Go back to basics and learn how your camera works and how to compose.
Whatever way works best for you: take a class, join a club, buy books or magazines.
If you learn best online, I recommend John Greengo's Fundamentals of Photography 2015 class at Creative Live.
Loads of other classes on photography and Photoshop at Creative Live and on Lynda.com (a subscription site which allows access to all their classes, but you can often get a month's free trial).
For free, there are some useful articles at the New York Institute of Photography and no doubt many other places.
Give yourself time to learn the basics.
Then, and only then, think about stock photography and what buyers want.

You've already had lots of great advice in this thread.
There are presumably plenty of other sites more geared towards starting photographers. However, beware of any which simply coo "Lovely, like, fave" - you'll learn nothing without strong criticism.


Good advice. I particularly agree with the last part about getting good strong criticism.

« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2015, 08:02 »
+8
Difydave, ShadySue and Hongover
I agree with everything you posted. Strong criticsm and hard opinions are excelent if they really are made to help.
I realised I have to take baby steps in all the aspects: tecnique, self criticsm, market etc. (I have to improve my english too, Im loosing a lot of information because my poor english)
I want you to know how much your opinion affected me in a good way. Hope get back and show some photos you aprove some day.
Thanks for the tips and for the critics.

« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2015, 10:59 »
0
Im trying to start from the very beginning. Please, ignore the subject. I tryed to concentrate on the focus and the light. I know I have a long way but my anxiety is bigger than me and I had to make this post to show you my first baby step. Season of critics is open.
The second picture is a crop I did in the photo in 100% so you can analize the focus and the noise.

« Reply #33 on: August 23, 2015, 11:19 »
+4
Please place the focus on the front, or better... stack the image ( Combine ZM). Next is the light, your lightsource does not reach the dark areas between the berries.
When I do photos like this I use 3 light sources ( strobes). Main and fill light, which should illuminate both the tops and bottom of the texture, set 45 degrees apart, and then a 3rd light from the side to produce textures in the subject, like on this one:
http://www.naturephotos.dk/showpic.php?kgf=23589&menu=1
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 12:05 by JPSDK »

« Reply #34 on: August 23, 2015, 13:24 »
+1
If you use ambient light (one light source) try use a reflectors to lit shadows. There is many simple and cheap choices to use, white paper, aluminium folio and so on. Of course blacks materials are important and versatile in a lighting planning tools too, to darken shadows.

Hongover

« Reply #35 on: August 23, 2015, 14:34 »
0
You need some serious work on your compositions. I can see why some people think you're trolling because it look like you just a got a budget DSLR from your parents/friends as a gift and you just started to take photos.

You have your camera on auto focus and you're shooting these berries without any considerations. Don't just snap the first thing your viewfinder sees, let it refocus on the foreground object before hitting the button.

Start reading stuff on the internet otherwise you'll never get the basics.

« Reply #36 on: August 23, 2015, 15:21 »
0
You need some serious work on your compositions. I can see why some people think you're trolling because it look like you just a got a budget DSLR from your parents/friends as a gift and you just started to take photos.

You have your camera on auto focus and you're shooting these berries without any considerations. Don't just snap the first thing your viewfinder sees, let it refocus on the foreground object before hitting the button.

Start reading stuff on the internet otherwise you'll never get the basics.

Dear Hongover
I swear that I had my camera on manual focus, that Im doing lots of researchs on the internet and taking a lot of photos. I just want to show I took the advices I got here very seriously and started right away.

« Reply #37 on: August 23, 2015, 18:39 »
0
This time I worked on the focus and the subject...
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 18:42 by micsmt »

« Reply #38 on: August 23, 2015, 23:24 »
+2
there are many problems.

Its meaningless
what does dollars have to do with beads?
Its unresolved.
its not sharp
it is grainy
the composition is cluttered
lighting is bad

Noedelhap

  • www.colincramm.com

« Reply #39 on: August 24, 2015, 04:17 »
0
It's "cheap" looking. Not sharp. Bad composition, Bad framing. Ugly yellowish tint.

« Reply #40 on: August 24, 2015, 07:46 »
+3
Seems to me that you're following the well worn path of a new photographers thinking there is a quick fix to taking good images.
Forget that. There is no "quick fix"


Berries : So you're trying to learn, but you start with one of the more difficult types of photography. "Macro" All sorts of difficulties with that. Selecting the correct aperture, depth of field, focussing in the right place, lighting. You need a solid tripod, and a remote shutter release at least to do any good. Lots of light too. The problems with your shots have already been pointed out.

Beads: Again the problems have been pointed out. None of your shots look very sharp to me. They need to be pin sharp at the point of focus when viewed at 100% All in camera processing like sharpening should be turned off. No good really posting these images that are little more than thumbnails. To have any real chance of seeing what is going on, you need to post full sized images, with the EXIF intact, and preferably watermarked.

The shot has a nasty yellow tint, as well as being "flat and grey" lacking contrast. As already said it looks "cheap" "Diamonds" on a black velvet background would be OK. Yellow plastic beads on "white" look cheap.

Seems to me (and without the EXIF I'm guessing) that you're still using either centre weighted or evaluative exposure metering. Try using spot metering on the actual subject for these type of things, along with manual settings. You don't have to use manual focus, although for some macro work it becomes necessary. For most subjects, single point auto focus will be enough.

Read The Friendly Manual. . .


« Reply #41 on: August 24, 2015, 16:27 »
0
Seems to me that you're following the well worn path of a new photographers thinking there is a quick fix to taking good images.
Forget that. There is no "quick fix"


Berries : So you're trying to learn, but you start with one of the more difficult types of photography. "Macro" All sorts of difficulties with that. Selecting the correct aperture, depth of field, focussing in the right place, lighting. You need a solid tripod, and a remote shutter release at least to do any good. Lots of light too. The problems with your shots have already been pointed out.

Beads: Again the problems have been pointed out. None of your shots look very sharp to me. They need to be pin sharp at the point of focus when viewed at 100% All in camera processing like sharpening should be turned off. No good really posting these images that are little more than thumbnails. To have any real chance of seeing what is going on, you need to post full sized images, with the EXIF intact, and preferably watermarked.

The shot has a nasty yellow tint, as well as being "flat and grey" lacking contrast. As already said it looks "cheap" "Diamonds" on a black velvet background would be OK. Yellow plastic beads on "white" look cheap.

Seems to me (and without the EXIF I'm guessing) that you're still using either centre weighted or evaluative exposure metering. Try using spot metering on the actual subject for these type of things, along with manual settings. You don't have to use manual focus, although for some macro work it becomes necessary. For most subjects, single point auto focus will be enough.

Read The Friendly Manual. . .

Difydave
I know I have a long, long way and I am not even thinking about upload anything soon.
I have no words to thank your patient and atention, not to mention you hability to teach. Everything you said will be processed and studied over and over.
I will control my anxiety now and upload something just when I really think I will have taken my first step in the right way.
Thanks again!!

« Reply #42 on: August 24, 2015, 19:07 »
+17
I understand you have issues with beginers

Wrong. I have no issues with beginners, but maybe some beginners have issues with me.
Let me tell you my story. This is for all beginners, if you'll only find it useful.
[I'm sorry for my bad English]

About at least 20 years ago I already was a "good photographer". There was no Facebook, no internet (as it's today), no online teachings, tutorials etc. I learned everything from books, magazines and from my own practice. All my friends and family praised my photos and spoke "You're the best!". But I himself was not very happy as I understood that I can and must do better. So one day I acquired courage and called one of the best, nationally recognized and reputable photographer. I asked maybe he could take a glance in to my photos and judge them. He agreed to give me one hour for a cup of coffee. As you know, there was no digital photography at that time. So I selected 10 of my best photos, printed them in the lab and we met. He has reviewed my photos, then... crumpled them ALL and threw in the trash bin! "What the s/*@# you're showing me?!"- he loudly asked. I was shocked. These were my best of the best photos! I asked, is there any hope that I will succeed in photography? He said, that if I want and if I will work very hardly and persistently, maybe one day I will take some good photos. Then he explained me the very basic what I should do. And we agreed to meet again in two weeks.

When I back home, I cried. I was angry. I was mad on him. I was full of self-pity and my self-esteem was below zero. I did not want to even look at my camera. I wanted to quit. After two or three days of deep depression I woke up and decided that I CAN. I MUST. And I WILL be a good photographer. So I furiously started to study basics. I took pictures everywhere: at home, in the yard, in the park, street etc. I printed them in the lab, examined them and again took pictures. I take notes on a paper of every single shot: aperture, shutter speed, again printed in lab and analyzed them. So after two weeks I selected my 10 new best photos and we met again. He reviewed them and selected ONE photo: "This one is very average. All others go to recycle bin". I was shocked again. And he explained me again, what I did wrong and how can I improve. I asked him for another one meeting, he agreed. So now I had another two weeks to prepare another 10 photos. I was angry again but I started from the very first day. I did the same things: read books, took pictures, printed them, examined and analyzed my notes, and again and again and again.

And we met third time. He took my photos, intently viewed them and this time selected five (FIVE!) photos. "These are mediocre. But from this point you can start learn something more". And he taught me next several steps and few basic rules of photography. We never meet again but I learned something.

Maybe in a year or two after our last meeting I called him and thanked. Even after many years I was so grateful to that man.

This man was not very cute. He was not polite. He was very categorical. And I had many reasons to hate him and be angry at him. But I concentrated on my purpose. And I worked very hard to achieve it. Not hours, days or weeks. Not even months, but years. Many years.

Today I'm a good photographer. Not the best by far, but good enough to make my living out of my photos. And I'm learning further every day.

So if you want only fluffy compliments, that's ok. You can get them from your family members or some close friends, but you'll learn nothing. Subservience will not teach you nothing, but will rise your self-love only, and you'll stay to live in a world of illusions.
But you will be thankful for a hard (and sometimes rough) critique after some time, if you will understand some principles deeply in your heart.

You're the only human being and you have feelings, so you can be angry and enraged. You feel depressed? Fine! Go ahead. Cry and scream that no one loves you. Feel distressed when your ego will be trampled. Weep and wail day and night. But one day you must stop and grow up.
If you really want to catch your dream, then stop self-pity, stand up, wipe your tears and set to work. Hard work.

Today you have internet so you have all the world in your hands. All teachings, tutorials, books, magazines, articles, examples are directly in front of you.
Today you don't need to go to the lab to see your photos, you can check them after one second on your camera screen.
Today you don't need to write on a paper values of aperture and shutter-speed. They appear right away right now.
So today the only one that can prevent to achieve your goal is you.
When you'll understand that, you will certainly succeed.

Thank you for so long reading and good luck!
4Seasons
« Last Edit: August 25, 2015, 03:58 by 4seasons »

« Reply #43 on: August 27, 2015, 14:47 »
0
bad photo. my first impression is "snapshotish" with no clear context and  concept.
 should not earn you a lot of (if any) money, but don't be surprised if you get some high-priced extended download. (i'm speaking from my personal experience, i had number of photos that really were crap - and got extended licenes downloads for these ones).

« Reply #44 on: September 01, 2015, 17:53 »
0

« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2015, 13:01 »
0
Now that I am taking lots of photos everyday, I wonder how great the old school photographers had to be. I try over and over (not whith satisfactory results yet, of course) but I dont spend any money or time to see the results so I can keep trying...
Hope someday I will take photos as good as this photographer (who took the pictures of the link in 1913)
http://mashable.com/2015/04/23/autochrome-photos-ogorman/


« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2015, 14:34 »
+2
Micsmt, don't worry too much about what other people think, just continue to do what you think it's right. Eventually you will find your own path.

Your photos are not that bad, you've got the idea. You will have to refine your execution in lighting, composition and post processing. You cannot please everyone, if you can please yourself and more and more buyers, you are successful.

Yesterday's masters may not produce masterpieces today. Today's newbies may become a master one day, that's a fact. We all had snapshots, that's a part of the learning process. Keep at it. Best of luck!

dbvirago

« Reply #47 on: September 06, 2015, 18:28 »
+1
and the photo you linked to wouldn't be accepted today. Noise, lighting, probably composition would get it rejected,

« Reply #48 on: September 06, 2015, 20:31 »
0
and the photo you linked to wouldn't be accepted today. Noise, lighting, probably composition would get it rejected,

Yes, it is "dated," to say the least.

« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2015, 20:33 »
+3
Just sold my first photo (first 0,48 cents) at Fotolia and Shutterstock finally acepted 9 of my 10 first pictures. I know I am just taking my first steps but feels so good to see some results...


 

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