pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Author Topic: what is my photo/portfolio worth?  (Read 5712 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

« on: December 11, 2016, 17:27 »
0
I just started selling photos about 3 weeks ago. I was wondering if you can give me an idea of how much I will make with it, only on shutterstock (other sites have not approved my work yet so they are not for sale)

My best selling photo sold 3 times on shutterstock (in the first 2 days) for 38 cents per sale.
http://www.shutterstock.com/pic.mhtml?id=519838123

How much is this photo going to earn me in the long run?

in 3 weeks, my entire SS portfolio has earned me about $20. every sale was for 38 cents. how much might I expect to earn with my existing portfolio in 1 year, or monthly, or for its lifetime? how many years do images sell for?

thanks


« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2016, 17:33 »
0
It takes much time for images to be sold frequently

« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2016, 17:38 »
+14
How do you make 38 cents per sale when your total is at $20? Something looks wrong here...

« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2016, 00:46 »
+1
How do you make 38 cents per sale when your total is at $20? Something looks wrong here...
Even I was thinking the same.

« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2016, 00:54 »
+1
Video earnings.  It's total earnings that determine your level at Shutterstock.

« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2016, 01:54 »
0
Video earnings.  It's total earnings that determine your level at Shutterstock.

I don't see any videos in his port.  Just a bunch of repeated people shots. So if no vids (as far as I could tell) how is it he makes 38 cents?

« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2016, 01:59 »
+5
Video earnings.  It's total earnings that determine your level at Shutterstock.


I don't see any videos in his port.  Just a bunch of repeated people shots. So if no vids (as far as I could tell) how is it he makes 38 cents?

http://www.shutterstock.com/video/search/?page=1&perpage=100&sort=popular&translation_method=service&use_local_boost=0&language=en&safesearch=1&version=llv1&site=videos&contributor=cheapbooks&lang=en

Shutterstock makes it a pain to look between footage and photos.

« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2016, 03:15 »
+2
in 3 weeks, my entire SS portfolio has earned me about $20. every sale was for 38 cents. how much might I expect to earn with my existing portfolio in 1 year, or monthly, or for its lifetime? how many years do images sell for?

So, you've got about 10,000 videos.  And you're at the highest royalty level.  So you have some idea how SS works, obviously.  Here's a tip, though.  Try a different composition then shooting the same thing repeatedly at eye level, from the shoulder up, cutting off the top of the head.

Something weird here.

JaenStock

  • Bad images can sell.
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2016, 05:26 »
+1
With 10.000 lifestyle average images con can earn 2500-5000 $ per mont in shutter.

But i dont know how many $ can be earned with 10.000 average lifestyle videos... ;)

Brasilnut

  • Author of the Brutally Honest Guide to Microstock
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2016, 07:36 »
0
Quote
How much is this photo going to earn me in the long run?

I don't think it will sell that much as it's just a simple portrait. If you get the hispanic girl and her friends to start doing selfies, for example, then it will up the images' commercial value considerably.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2016, 08:32 »
+4
At the risk of pointing out the obvious, have you considered dividing your $20 over the three weeks it took to make, and then multiplying it by 52 to get an estimated forecast for the year?

Sure, your rate of sales might increase and you'll make more, but it's impossible to say if it will decrease over time as well... it's a bit hard to say after only three weeks.

How long they will sell for is a bit of a tough one as well. Might depend on the content. A picture of somebody with the latest smartphone can quickly become a photo of somebody without the latest smartphone. Same with cars, fashion, changing skylines etc. Certain landscapes and stuff that doesn't really change over time, are likely to have more longevity.

« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2016, 13:27 »
0
please let me explain a bit further...

I have perhaps 30,000 photos. however, processing them and preparing them for sale takes a long time. I sent some test images to SS to determine if it is viable, if it is worth putting the time into putting them up for sale. my first impression is that it will be largely a waste of time considering that it will divert me from my other work.

I have been averaging about 75 cents to $1 per day but to me I am not sure if it is worth it to continue doing so if each photo might only sell 1 time, and only 10% of them sell.

I would rather get some insight now, rather than wait 1 year to see if it was worth it.

« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2016, 14:12 »
+4
Over the past few decades the rule of thumb was $1 per image per year for the images on sale from your library. These days maybe $.50 or $.25. There is also a wide range depending if your images are unique and selling from a unique outlet or if they are run-of-the-mill "tomatoes on white" sold at bargain prices in Microstock with heavy similars competition. All you can do is put up a couple thousand images, wait a couple of years, and calculate how it is working for you. Also note how the market changes over that time so you can judge your efforts going forward.

« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2017, 05:48 »
0
I think you have a very repetitive portfolio... I saw even photos that are twice in the portfolio, you should choose between the photos that are almost the same, not to put the whole photoshoot... choose the ones that can have the most sales... I think you could earn something, but clean your portfolio... i have the impression that i am looking at the same photo all over again...

« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2017, 12:18 »
+2
30000 repetitive photos...10000 repetitive videos of medium low quality....then we still discuss while is difficult to sell in micro stock and why we reach 100 million....
no offence but if this portfolio video and photo earn 2500 5000 we will assist next month to submission of anybody in the world...

« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2017, 12:20 »
+2
I think you have a very repetitive portfolio... I saw even photos that are twice in the portfolio, you should choose between the photos that are almost the same, not to put the whole photoshoot... choose the ones that can have the most sales... I think you could earn something, but clean your portfolio... i have the impression that i am looking at the same photo all over again...


what a mess shutter stock...really in 2008 2009 probably 3 files over 800 would have been accepted.
i understand why stocksy is growing fast...what customer want browse to the mess of millions of poor quality files...

« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2017, 12:23 »
0
:)
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 18:32 by jonbull »

« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2017, 18:32 »
0
I think you have a very repetitive portfolio... I saw even photos that are twice in the portfolio, you should choose between the photos that are almost the same, not to put the whole photoshoot... choose the ones that can have the most sales... I think you could earn something, but clean your portfolio... i have the impression that i am looking at the same photo all over again...


not intended to be rude sorry

« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2017, 16:35 »
+1
Taking pics just to count money they will bring you seems a bit strange for me. Photographer is a profession and it should be paid of course but don't forget to provide your clients with something worth buying. The photo isn't bad but i don't think it will make you a millionaire.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2017, 16:46 »
+3
Taking pics just to count money they will bring you seems a bit strange for me.

Seems completely natural to me. Sure, it's a profession, or a business might be a more accurate description, but if your business isn't making sufficient revenue, then that's am issue.

People should be looking at their sales figures, working out their return per image, forecasting how much they're likely to make on an image. Then you're in a better position to plan future shoots and work out what's going to give you the best return.

Making great images is the main part of the profession, but what images you make and what you do with them is just as important.

« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2017, 17:01 »
+3
Taking pics just to count money they will bring you seems a bit strange for me.

Seems completely natural to me. Sure, it's a profession, or a business might be a more accurate description, but if your business isn't making sufficient revenue, then that's am issue.

People should be looking at their sales figures, working out their return per image, forecasting how much they're likely to make on an image. Then you're in a better position to plan future shoots and work out what's going to give you the best return.

Making great images is the main part of the profession, but what images you make and what you do with them is just as important.
Putting pictures up for sale and not counting the money seems more strange...some pictures I take cos I like them some I take only because I think they might sell.

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2017, 17:54 »
0
* straight!

SpaceStockFootage

  • Space, Sci-Fi and Astronomy Related Stock Footage

« Reply #22 on: April 16, 2017, 19:19 »
0
Maybe a bit of an out of date answer to your last post in December, but still....

This isn't rocket science. You have historical data, and although it's still maybe a bit too soon to give any kind of accurate forecast... all you have to do is take your total earnings so far, divide it by the amount of days since you uploaded them, divide that by the total number of images, multiply it by 365 and then multiply that by 30,000.

That will give you a rough idea of how much you stand to make over the coming year. You can then use that dollar amount to decide whether it's worth your time.

Sure, that's not going to be spot on, and you may have only uploaded your best stuff for your test... but it should give you a ball park figure.

There's nothing wrong with asking for advice and hearing anecdotal evidence of what other people are earning, but you're the only one that knows exactly how much you are earning currently, and from how many files.

« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2017, 03:22 »
0
Taking pics just to count money they will bring you seems a bit strange for me.

Seems completely natural to me. Sure, it's a profession, or a business might be a more accurate description, but if your business isn't making sufficient revenue, then that's am issue.

People should be looking at their sales figures, working out their return per image, forecasting how much they're likely to make on an image. Then you're in a better position to plan future shoots and work out what's going to give you the best return.

Making great images is the main part of the profession, but what images you make and what you do with them is just as important.
Putting pictures up for sale and not counting the money seems more strange...some pictures I take cos I like them some I take only because I think they might sell.

Do you take pics you don't like just to sell them? (I don't criticize you, just curious.)

« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2017, 06:18 »
+1
Taking pics just to count money they will bring you seems a bit strange for me.

Seems completely natural to me. Sure, it's a profession, or a business might be a more accurate description, but if your business isn't making sufficient revenue, then that's am issue.

People should be looking at their sales figures, working out their return per image, forecasting how much they're likely to make on an image. Then you're in a better position to plan future shoots and work out what's going to give you the best return.

Making great images is the main part of the profession, but what images you make and what you do with them is just as important.
Putting pictures up for sale and not counting the money seems more strange...some pictures I take cos I like them some I take only because I think they might sell.

Do you take pics you don't like just to sell them? (I don't criticize you, just curious.)
Don't like might be a bit strong but I take plenty I wouldn't if I were doing this just for "art" or my own satisfaction....just as I'm sure the "old masters" did portraits of people they don't like or even say Doctors who treat people they don't like.


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
6 Replies
4611 Views
Last post April 16, 2010, 06:47
by Magic Toolbox
7 Replies
1452 Views
Last post September 03, 2011, 12:52
by mlwinphoto
24 Replies
5627 Views
Last post December 11, 2016, 18:51
by cathyslife
197 Replies
15007 Views
Last post June 11, 2015, 01:39
by Semmick Photo
4 Replies
1047 Views
Last post September 06, 2016, 13:40
by Tyson Anderson

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors