pancakes

MicrostockGroup Sponsors


Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - PeterChigmaroff

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 71
1
Both Revolut and Transferwise are good: low currency conversion fees, free prepaid cards, free atm up to //$100 per month...

But how do you get paid from stock agencies?

- Major sites don't send bank transfers to European contributors;
- Some that do (Creative Market) only pay to your own country; both Revolut and Transferwise give us only a German IBAN, so other european countries are out of luck; and even Germans can't receive payments in dollars to their German IBAN;
- Payoneer does not allow Europeans to withdraw in dollars;
- Paypal does not allow to withdraw in a different currency and to a different country than your own;

So I still haven't found a way to be paid from stock agencies to Revolut or Transferwise.

Unless agencies decide to work with them directly, there's potential but no actual way.

Any ideas?
TransferWise has something they call a Borderless account. I've only started to use it but it shows promise. Once you're set up it only takes a click or two to create bank accounts in Euros with Swift and IBAN numbers, GPB with sort codes, USD with wire routing etc. Internally it's a small fee to do currency exchange if needed. Fees seem quite reasonable compared to PP.

I know, exchange rates are great (less than 1% compared to over 3.5% Paypal) and already use TransferWise Borderless accounts for other freelance work.

But Shutterstock, Fotolia, iStock and most top sites (with the exception of Alamy) won't pay European artists to a bank account! That's the problem.
Those that do (PanterMedia, ColourBox, MostPhotos, Zoonar, ScanStock) are irrelevant because sales are almost non-existent.

I get what you're saying. The trick seems to be getting the money out of PayPal in the currency they establish without having to use their exchange services. What I don't know is can you send from PP to TW in that currency, what ever it is. If you can, then you can access a much better exchange rate with TW or just move the PP currency to your home account with TW. It is a two stage process but can save quite a bit of money.

This is exactly the problem. PayPal only allows to withdraw to a bank account in the local currency of the account holder. They'd do the conversion from USD to e.g. EUR, using their horrendous rate, before the money reaches TW.

There may be some exceptions or workaround in some specific countries (e.g. here: https://jeangalea.com/changing-paypal-withdrawal-currency/ ).
Thanks for your insight. I was hoping there would be a way to transfer USD PP to a USD TW but it looks like I'm heading for a disappointment.

2
Both Revolut and Transferwise are good: low currency conversion fees, free prepaid cards, free atm up to //$100 per month...

But how do you get paid from stock agencies?

- Major sites don't send bank transfers to European contributors;
- Some that do (Creative Market) only pay to your own country; both Revolut and Transferwise give us only a German IBAN, so other european countries are out of luck; and even Germans can't receive payments in dollars to their German IBAN;
- Payoneer does not allow Europeans to withdraw in dollars;
- Paypal does not allow to withdraw in a different currency and to a different country than your own;

So I still haven't found a way to be paid from stock agencies to Revolut or Transferwise.

Unless agencies decide to work with them directly, there's potential but no actual way.

Any ideas?
TransferWise has something they call a Borderless account. I've only started to use it but it shows promise. Once you're set up it only takes a click or two to create bank accounts in Euros with Swift and IBAN numbers, GPB with sort codes, USD with wire routing etc. Internally it's a small fee to do currency exchange if needed. Fees seem quite reasonable compared to PP.

I know, exchange rates are great (less than 1% compared to over 3.5% Paypal) and already use TransferWise Borderless accounts for other freelance work.

But Shutterstock, Fotolia, iStock and most top sites (with the exception of Alamy) won't pay European artists to a bank account! That's the problem.
Those that do (PanterMedia, ColourBox, MostPhotos, Zoonar, ScanStock) are irrelevant because sales are almost non-existent.

I get what you're saying. The trick seems to be getting the money out of PayPal in the currency they establish without having to use their exchange services. What I don't know is can you send from PP to TW in that currency, what ever it is. If you can, then you can access a much better exchange rate with TW or just move the PP currency to your home account with TW. It is a two stage process but can save quite a bit of money.

3
Both Revolut and Transferwise are good: low currency conversion fees, free prepaid cards, free atm up to //$100 per month...

But how do you get paid from stock agencies?

- Major sites don't send bank transfers to European contributors;
- Some that do (Creative Market) only pay to your own country; both Revolut and Transferwise give us only a German IBAN, so other european countries are out of luck; and even Germans can't receive payments in dollars to their German IBAN;
- Payoneer does not allow Europeans to withdraw in dollars;
- Paypal does not allow to withdraw in a different currency and to a different country than your own;

So I still haven't found a way to be paid from stock agencies to Revolut or Transferwise.

Unless agencies decide to work with them directly, there's potential but no actual way.

Any ideas?
TransferWise has something they call a Borderless account. I've only started to use it but it shows promise. Once you're set up it only takes a click or two to create bank accounts in Euros with Swift and IBAN numbers, GPB with sort codes, USD with wire routing etc. Internally it's a small fee to do currency exchange if needed. Fees seem quite reasonable compared to PP.

5
Also, if your camera was shifting from the wind, then again you are either using very low level amateur equipment, or don't know how to use it.  I have used my tripod (gitzo carbon fiber travel tripod) in heavy winds and not had any problems at all.  You need to do such things as NEVER raise the center pole, hang a bag (often my camera bag) on the hook under the center column to weight it down, etc.

Try photographing on a sandy beach and/or use a 400 mm lens and you might change your opinion on this.  ;) Not to mention anything made of wood. You can bolt your camera down and still have movement.

If you use a program like FCPX to edit the timelapes, the stabilizer has a "Tripod" mode where it will shift frames to remove small bounce and jiggle caused by wind. I've had good success with it from drone footage shot over a 5 minute period while in a hover and turned that into a timelapse clip with no apparant motion, as if on a giant stable tripod.

6
Only for content that demands a GoPro to be there or the shot would't happen.

7
General Stock Discussion / Re: iStock is "stealing" my videos
« on: April 27, 2018, 10:57 »
Final customer really does not care if product was made with hogh-end or lower-end equipment. The only criteria is "does this product fit my needs?" and "can i afford it?". It might sound cruel (and at some points - it is), however, that's how it works.
If the final product is a 500 pixel wide email GIF insert then you're probably right but there is a wide segment of the market where technical quality is every bit as important as aesthetic quality.

8
Learn how to interpret the various chroma and luma wavefroms and vectorscopes. You'd be able to see how you blew out the whites without even looking at the final render.

10
Photography Equipment / Re: Is Ebay a Waste of Time?
« on: November 21, 2017, 12:20 »
It's not 2005 anymore. E-bay is useless. Craigs List is Best. I've sold stuff In Minutes and I don't ship. Meet me for coffee and bring Cash. Period.
This is mostly how I feel. I've only had one bad experience selling on eBay but enough to keep me from using it except in special cases. If you are selling something rare or eclectic, eBay can be a better choice, but otherwise local sales choices like CL are better.

11
My new GoPro Hero 6 outputs 4K - 60fps and 2.7K - 120fps clips in HEVC - H 265 only.  Final Cut Pro, DaVinci Resolve (free version), Quicktime and imovie all fail to open the files.  The internet says FCP will update eventually...

I downloaded a trial version of Brorsoft Video Converter.  It does convert to 422 which would be okay for short clips but the file sizes are too far too big to work with if you have an hour of footage to chop.  Anyone working in Final Cut Pro with GoPro Hero 6 in h265 yet?  If so please let me know the best conversion work flow. 

Update:  Updated my Mac system to High Sierra and updated imovie.  HEVC - H 265 will preview in Quick Time Player and Finder now and import into imovie.. but will not export 4K.  Seems crazy that FCP is lagging behind.

Best h.265 convertor is iFFmpeg. About 18 Euro but a decent program that allows a wide variety of transcoding settings.

12
Mantis,

Yes I guess it is within Compressor. I bought the two together so can't actually tell.

13
Mantis, not my first choice in codecs but photo jpeg does seem to be there in FCP.

14
I find it a bit amusing that so many think it's completely natural to expect no less than $79-$199 for a few seconds of footage but don't want to spend even half that for software that takes years to develop.  ;D

If you're interesting in doing video, do yourself a favor and get the real software right away.

For me, I have Final Cut Pro X. But since it does not output certain codecs, I can just use MPEG (or used to) for quick access. For me, it's not about cheap. It's about speed and flexibility.  So I now use Quicktime Player Pro (that I paid for) which works just fine to export to other formats. For me, clipping will be done in FCPX where I have better control, but you can do it in Quicktime as well (if your'a Mac user).

Anyhow, I agree that to do things right you should make a modest investment for the right tools.

Mantis, I am surprised you are using FCPX and are having trouble getting the codec you want especially for stock. What are you missing?

15
Originally I was looking for a proper H.265 to ProRes converter. There a lot out there but most are substandard. I found something called iFFmpeg which is quite good. I see besides being a transcoder it does basic editing like trims and filter applications, rotations etc. It's not free but not expensive either. 18 euros I think

16
New Sites - General / Re: OverflightStock
« on: October 21, 2017, 15:52 »
Hey folks

Yes indeed we are working hard to build a solid collection and network of contributors and of customers, quite literally from the ground up. The process involves many challenges and what are worthwhile add ons, like contributor back ends, take second place to more important aspects of the company's growth. Sometimes it may appear as if all is stagnant, but there really is a great deal of work going on, not only to build our niche but to connect that niche to a customer base.

Overflightstock never started out to become another long tail agency like the many you are used to. This hasn't changed. We have started to tighten up the collection and will continue to tighten it up. High end buyers expect high end products and they expect service and they don't want to have to sift through thousands of non relevant files. This is what we are selling. The 79/199 video is not the primary product but we certainly realize that many users require this and will find a way to mix the two so it makes sense to the buyer.

Long tails agencies need you to do the background work; there is no other way for them to ingest the millions of assets per week that they do. For us, there is a lot of advantages to not giving access to the contributors in this regard. But it hardly means that contributors don't have a say in what appears on the site, both visually and WRT to metadata. Quite the opposite. Sales are made, reports and money are sent out, information is there.

One of a couple of scenarios can play out: those who insist that Overflightstock is waste of time can indeed be proven right OR those who took the time contribute will be there to share in its success. I happen to think it will be the second.

Cheers,

Peter







17
That's all great getting your USD deposited in a USD account in Canada, and not having any fees as a result... but what if you want to actually spend this money? I'm assuming Canadian ATM's don't dispense USD, and if they did, would most places accept them? And more importantly, would they accept them without charging you a fee? There's always a fee somewhere down the line.
Even if all you wanted to do is move the money over to a Canadian account at the same bank, the exchange rate would likely be better.

18
One time, I even went to BMO Branch to pay my BMO U.S.$ credit card with a wad of U.S$ cash in my hands and they wouldn't take it because they would lose on  the rate.  (Mind baffling isn't it?)  I had to deposit it into a CDN$ account and pay conversion fees then pay the fee to convert it back to U.S.$ and yes, I said f*You and made the teller call and cancel the card before I left the bank.

It doesn't matter which major city you go to in the world, the biggest buildings in the best parts of town are usually banking centres.

19
There used to be workaround with a certain type of RBC USD account, where you "could" get USD from PP arrive as USD into that account but believe that is all history now.

20
A modified DeLorean DMC-12
I was going to say a consult with HG Wells was in order but thought maybe that's exactly what's happened.

21
General - Stock Video / Re: h264 vs Photo JPEG
« on: September 03, 2017, 10:43 »
Thank you for you answers. As far as I understand, I won't be gaining much from switching to photoJPEG.

No, it's like switching back to a 28.8 modem and a 4:3 TV.
I agree, maybe not 28.8 but definitely no more than 56k

"Motion-JPEG: this is an adaptation for video of the JPEG compression scheme (used for still photographs). Actually MJPEG just encodes each frame with JPEG, using optimizations for speed and possibly for similar frames."

22
As an editor or a curator you'd have to be completely asleep not to see this.

23
I'm trying to find out a good way of emailing a model/talent release to people that's easy for them to fill out and send back, that doesn't require them to print and scan it.  I've been using the Easy Release app for all my releases in person but I'm looking for a way to email releases with a curser at all the required boxes and an E-Signature or signature that auto fills when they type their name.  This type of thing is not my specialty so any information would help, thanks.

And yes I know the professional thing would be to have people sign a release before filming.  I've been doing aerial work of kayaking and rafting.  Sometimes I'm told a certain part of a river to post up at and don't get to see some of the people before or after the float.  This example is what created the issue.
Tyson, You could use a regular release in PDF but send it by one of many different signing services. You define the necessary details for them to fill in. Unfortunately most of them cost money.

24
General - Top Sites / Re: My 5 cents on this
« on: May 08, 2017, 08:45 »

 HD is still the standard, the normal, today. It will be many, many years before (if ever) 8k is the standard. Of course for ONE camera content, not VR environments. That is not comparable. Fully realistic VR will require 100k.

I agree totally. Even as the last brick and mortar video rental store shut down, the transition to renting out BluRay hadn't really happened. In an area of production, where the highest standards of production were attained, the end user didn't really care or notice. Plain old vanilla DVD was fine.

25
General - Top Sites / Re: Thoughs On 4K Video For Stock
« on: May 07, 2017, 13:29 »
Way back when the transition from film to file for images was taking hold almost no one would consider taking a jpeg. It was for the most part lossless TIFFs. Those that suggested jpegs might be alright were usually scorned for not understanding the nuances of the new digital landscape. I suspect that sensors weren't quite as good and RAW files not as robust but fast forward a decade or so and I don't think anyway delivers anything but jpegs. It's kinda where I see h.264 right now.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 71

Sponsors

Microstock Poll Results

Sponsors