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Author Topic: Shutterstock want to buy "all right" of one of my images  (Read 1675 times)

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« on: November 02, 2018, 21:13 »
0
I'm I alone... are they really buying images and so they can rule the stock world without us ?
Story block asked me the same last year.
I never said yes, but they are talking about a decent amount of money now... 1500$ is a lot seriously !

Here is the message:
++++++++++++++++

Dear (my name)

I am happy to notify you that we are interested in buying all rights to image "123456whatever" in your portfolio on behalf of our client.

For this offer to proceed, I would like to know the following from you:

1. Are you interested in a full copyright transfer of this image to Shutterstock for (a minimum) of $1500.00 commission? (Client is looking at 1yr, 2yr, and indefinite exclusivity.  $1500 would be the least amount of the payout for 1 year)

2. Where else is the image available and for how long has it been available at those agencies? (If terms are finalized, the image and similars will need to be removed from all other agencies, including Shutterstock)

3. Are there similar images in addition to and that we need to be aware of? If yes, please explain where the similars are and how many exist total. This offer is time sensitive so please confirm whether or not you are interested in this offer as soon as possible. I look forward to hearing from you.


« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2018, 21:31 »
+6
If this is a serious legit offer from ShutterStock, I am not sure why you are even asking here?

Personally, I would take it without a doubt, but then I certainly have no single image that earns me $1500 per year, so to me this is a no-brainer.

k_t_g

  • The Vector barber is in.
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2018, 22:22 »
+1
Up to the individual I guess. Personally I wouldn't. Not enough peanuts.

« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2018, 23:05 »
+5
If the image already sells well for you, don't do it.

If the image doesn't sell well for you and is a subject that won't sell regularly, do it!

« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2018, 23:51 »
+6
I don't understand the offer being made - but no, I haven't heard of Shutterstock buying out images before.

What I don't understand is that copyright transfer to Shutterstock is a one time legal transaction for which I would expect a one time payment from SS. Once they own the copyright they are free to do what they want with the image(s).

If they're talking about minimum payout for the first year with the possibility of more money later, that doesn't sound like a copyright transfer but a complex rights managed deal.

If the restrictions on the sister images are forever, I'd suggest that you try and sell the copyrights to all of the images rather than give away any earnings for sister images at all images for all time, particularly if the subject matter/people/props/location is one where you have many images that would no longer be licensable.

$1,500 is a nice royalty, but they're asking for a lot of rights, so don't shortchange yourself.

« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2018, 04:45 »
0
I don't understand the offer being made - but no, I haven't heard of Shutterstock buying out images before.

What I don't understand is that copyright transfer to Shutterstock is a one time legal transaction for which I would expect a one time payment from SS. Once they own the copyright they are free to do what they want with the image(s).

If they're talking about minimum payout for the first year with the possibility of more money later, that doesn't sound like a copyright transfer but a complex rights managed deal.

If the restrictions on the sister images are forever, I'd suggest that you try and sell the copyrights to all of the images rather than give away any earnings for sister images at all images for all time, particularly if the subject matter/people/props/location is one where you have many images that would no longer be licensable.

$1,500 is a nice royalty, but they're asking for a lot of rights, so don't shortchange yourself.

Quite right! they dont buy images outright!  why should they!

« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2018, 06:41 »
+1
I don't understand the offer being made - but no, I haven't heard of Shutterstock buying out images before.

What I don't understand is that copyright transfer to Shutterstock is a one time legal transaction for which I would expect a one time payment from SS. Once they own the copyright they are free to do what they want with the image(s).

If they're talking about minimum payout for the first year with the possibility of more money later, that doesn't sound like a copyright transfer but a complex rights managed deal.

If the restrictions on the sister images are forever, I'd suggest that you try and sell the copyrights to all of the images rather than give away any earnings for sister images at all images for all time, particularly if the subject matter/people/props/location is one where you have many images that would no longer be licensable.

$1,500 is a nice royalty, but they're asking for a lot of rights, so don't shortchange yourself.

Quite right! they dont buy images outright!  why should they!
The email says they are doing on behalf of a buyer so not them paying. I don't though if its something Shutterstock would do though. I know Dreamstimes do it.

« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2018, 06:48 »
+2
I don't understand the offer being made - but no, I haven't heard of Shutterstock buying out images before.

What I don't understand is that copyright transfer to Shutterstock is a one time legal transaction for which I would expect a one time payment from SS. Once they own the copyright they are free to do what they want with the image(s).

If they're talking about minimum payout for the first year with the possibility of more money later, that doesn't sound like a copyright transfer but a complex rights managed deal.

If the restrictions on the sister images are forever, I'd suggest that you try and sell the copyrights to all of the images rather than give away any earnings for sister images at all images for all time, particularly if the subject matter/people/props/location is one where you have many images that would no longer be licensable.

$1,500 is a nice royalty, but they're asking for a lot of rights, so don't shortchange yourself.

Quite right! they dont buy images outright!  why should they!


Shutterstock isnt buying it...they are buying it on behalf of a client. That happens sometimes.

For 1 yr exclusivity, I would take $1500, assuming I dont make anywhere near that in a year on the image.

Shelma1

« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2018, 07:29 »
+2
As others have said, it's up to you to determine whether it's worth it. If the image makes you more than $1500/yr, not worth it. If the image makes much less, it might be worth it. If they expect you to take it down everywhere else, figure out how much you'd charge for your time to do that and add that to potential royalties from that image. If they want you to take down all similar images everywhere, that could be a big undertaking and cost you a lot of income, depending on how popular the images are. Also, the time you spend taking things down is less time you have to create more images.

From what they wrote, it sounds like the minimum payout would be $1500 for one year of exclusivity and more for longer than that. I'd answer them and see where it goes.

« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2018, 08:04 »
+2
I've had several similar offers- None of them were serious so don't lose any sleep on this one.   8)


« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2018, 09:07 »
+1
Yes. I have had a couple offers, too, they never seem to go anywhere.

« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2018, 09:26 »
0
Seems worth it as long as the image doesn't have a lot of conflicts with other images in your portfolio. Like others said though, it is really up to the individual to determine what their images are worth.

« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2018, 10:42 »
+1
Look at how much you currently make per year on that image. If it is close to $0/year - then yes, go for it.

Curious - what image is it? (If you want to PM me, thats okay too - just very curious what they would pay $1500 for).

Cheers!

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2018, 11:47 »
0
Seems worth it as long as the image doesn't have a lot of conflicts with other images in your portfolio. Like others said though, it is really up to the individual to determine what their images are worth.

I think you are right. Someone else on a different version of the same question said, "how much do you need the money, right now"? Come on, the market isn't exactly growing and making profit gains for most of us, is it? Holding out for the long term could be waiting for some returns that never happen.

If the question is about the problems, the exclusive, the close duplicates, that needs to be factored in. Plus it appears to be a minimum of one year for $1,500 with possible more after that. The note also adds, possibly 2 years or buy out. These are all different.

If it's an exclusive license for one or two years, not so complicated. 1 year, how much does the image make in two years? Two years? How much dos the image make in three years. Buy out how much did the image make in the last four years? Double that.  :)

Whatever, it's up to the individual and how much that image and the related images will earn in the next two to four years.

Has anyone else here, ever had SS make a buyout offer for anything, ever? Seems highly unusual.

« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2018, 13:55 »
+2
...Are you interested in a full copyright transfer of this image to Shutterstock for (a minimum) of $1500.00 commission?...

Why do those who say the copyright transfer is to the client think that? That's not what the text in the OP says.

I'm not all that concerned with this transaction - up to the person affected - but am concerned if SS is embarking on a new way to do business that might not be advantageous to contributors. I'm aware of what Dreamstime does, but that's hardly any sort of industry standard.

Just remember that it's the money you get at the time of the deal that's important - hints, but no legal commitments to pay, future sums are worthless.

« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2018, 14:13 »
+3
...Are you interested in a full copyright transfer of this image to Shutterstock for (a minimum) of $1500.00 commission?...

Why do those who say the copyright transfer is to the client think that? That's not what the text in the OP says.

I'm not all that concerned with this transaction - up to the person affected - but am concerned if SS is embarking on a new way to do business that might not be advantageous to contributors. I'm aware of what Dreamstime does, but that's hardly any sort of industry standard.

Just remember that it's the money you get at the time of the deal that's important - hints, but no legal commitments to pay, future sums are worthless.

"On behalf of our client" in the first line would suggest that the client would be the end copyright holder.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2018, 16:55 by obj owl »

« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2018, 10:52 »
0
I have been contacted in the past for special licenses for their client (clips being part of a famous artist videoclip).

If Shutterstock wants to buy copyright off you for 1500$ USD my guess is that they negociated with their client a much higher pricing or a long term price payments. But you'll never the deal they struct, you can either counter offer with a higher price and maybe lose the opportunity, or accept the offer. I have sold many images copyright for 1000$ depending on the use, and most images will take 5 to 10 years to even make that amount, if it ever reaches it. Check your bestsellers lifetime earning and you'll get an idea, to me it sounds a good deal even if I know Shutterstock must be selling back to their client for 10 000$.

I'm I alone... are they really buying images and so they can rule the stock world without us ?
Story block asked me the same last year.
I never said yes, but they are talking about a decent amount of money now... 1500$ is a lot seriously !

Here is the message:
++++++++++++++++

Dear (my name)

I am happy to notify you that we are interested in buying all rights to image "123456whatever" in your portfolio on behalf of our client.

For this offer to proceed, I would like to know the following from you:

1. Are you interested in a full copyright transfer of this image to Shutterstock for (a minimum) of $1500.00 commission? (Client is looking at 1yr, 2yr, and indefinite exclusivity.  $1500 would be the least amount of the payout for 1 year)

2. Where else is the image available and for how long has it been available at those agencies? (If terms are finalized, the image and similars will need to be removed from all other agencies, including Shutterstock)

3. Are there similar images in addition to and that we need to be aware of? If yes, please explain where the similars are and how many exist total. This offer is time sensitive so please confirm whether or not you are interested in this offer as soon as possible. I look forward to hearing from you.


« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2018, 11:02 »
0
I have been contacted in the past for special licenses for their client (clips being part of a famous artist videoclip).

If Shutterstock wants to buy copyright off you for 1500$ USD my guess is that they negociated with their client a much higher pricing or a long term price payments. But you'll never the deal they struct, you can either counter offer with a higher price and maybe lose the opportunity, or accept the offer. I have sold many images copyright for 1000$ depending on the use, and most images will take 5 to 10 years to even make that amount, if it ever reaches it. Check your bestsellers lifetime earning and you'll get an idea, to me it sounds a good deal even if I know Shutterstock must be selling back to their client for 10 000$.


Which is it "my guess" or "I know"?

« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2018, 12:39 »
+3
Ive done it once with a video: as long as it is not one of your top sellers that is highly likely to earn you that amount within 3-4 years, do it!
They may ask you though, to delete some similars, and also to delete them on other sites you have the files on. Do your maths before.

« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2018, 06:25 »
0
I have been contacted in the past for special licenses for their client (clips being part of a famous artist videoclip).

If Shutterstock wants to buy copyright off you for 1500$ USD my guess is that they negociated with their client a much higher pricing or a long term price payments. But you'll never the deal they struct, you can either counter offer with a higher price and maybe lose the opportunity, or accept the offer. I have sold many images copyright for 1000$ depending on the use, and most images will take 5 to 10 years to even make that amount, if it ever reaches it. Check your bestsellers lifetime earning and you'll get an idea, to me it sounds a good deal even if I know Shutterstock must be selling back to their client for 10 000$.


Which is it "my guess" or "I know"?
I guess that the Even if that comes before the I know makes it just the same.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


 

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