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Author Topic: Back to RAW  (Read 2784 times)

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WarrenPrice

« on: May 06, 2012, 12:28 »
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I had been shooting in RAW/JPEG but dropped RAW in favor of conserving disc space, especially since getting the 18MP T2i.  JPEG seemed to work fine until recently.  I've been getting CA and purple fringing rejections.  I must credit iStock for detailing their rejection.  It made it obvious, even to these old eyes.

This happens mostly with my Canon T2i and cheap lenses -- and some with my Tokina 35mm f2.8 Macro.

I am cheap and still using Photoshop Elements for all my cataloging and editing.  I see no way there for correcting Chromatic Aberration.  Make that no "simple" way.  There is a convoluted masking technique that may or may not work?

I found a possible solution in Canon's FREE Digital Photo Professional but it doesn't work with JPEG or TIFF, only RAW.
So, back to shooting RAW.  Unless, someone can recommend a JPEG solution?
Thanks


« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2012, 12:44 »
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You can use Photoshop: Filter - Lens Correction. But it's definitely less precise than correcting of Raw files in Adobe Raw and it deforms images a little bit (usually it's not visible) and you have to crop image again.

ShadySue

« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2012, 12:58 »
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I found this tutorial: http://www.photoshopelementsuser.com/video/removing-chromatic-aberration-with-elements, and there is more hits on a search on "photoshop elements" and "Chromatic aberration". Disclaimer: I haven't tried any of them.

I have not noticed any correlation between reduction of CR in my expensive L series lenses as opposed to my older Sigma lenses, by the way. The opposite if anything.

Good luck.

ShadySue

« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2012, 13:04 »
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I wonder if there's any way you can open your jpg in Element's RAW editor. You can eidt JPEGs in Photoshop's version of RAW. I see that the version of RAW in Elements is 6.6, but it's a cut down version of the one in CS5. I can't see how to do it, but I'm not that familiar with Elements, so there might be a way.

Wim

« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2012, 13:12 »
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I have learned a lot from istock reviews Warren! best agency where reviewing is concerned.
They actualy make you feel you are involved with a professional team of reviewers, not some kids trying to make a quick buck or who love to play bingo.
Mind you they reject all my compositions (which are my best selling images) for overfiltering but they are still my n1 agency where reviewing is concerned.

Always shoot RAW mate, don't even think about JPEG unless you're shooting action and your cam can't keep up.
PS and LR is all you need my friend, don't waste your time on the kiddie stuff (PE)

Later old geezer ;)
« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 13:14 by Wim »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2012, 13:38 »
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@jm -- I've used the filter "lens correction" but do not see a correction for CA.  I'm using Elements, not PS;
@ Sue -- I have Elements 8 and do have the Adobe RAW capability ... but don't see a way to open JPEGS.  I'm researching that possibility.

@WIM -- I've stuck with elements thru the years because of the cataloging capability.  Just can't seem to go thru the hassle of converting to any other system.  Was really upset when changing from Elements 5 to 8.  It really screwed up my tagging/keyword hierarchy.   >:(
I suppose I'll have to return to RAW (CR2) with the Canon but continue shooting JPEG with my Nikon.
Life was so simple until iS enlightened me.   ;)

O what a tangled web we weave.   ::)

lisafx

« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2012, 13:48 »
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Disk space is really cheap now.  Might be worth getting a larger memory card and a cheap usb hard drive to store the images. 

I know what you mean about the old eyes.  Thank goodness for the 100% zoom or I would never spot the noise, c/a etc. 

« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2012, 13:50 »
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I think DXO optics can do it (and much more):
http://www.dxo.com/intl/photo/dxo_optics_pro/features

169$

« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2012, 14:14 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\

lisafx

« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2012, 14:38 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\

Some feature.  :P

Lightroom has it.  Hope they don't get rid of it in LR too. 

« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2012, 14:44 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\

Some feature.  :P

Lightroom has it.  Hope they don't get rid of it in LR too. 

They do:
Adobe Lighroom 4: The Lens Corrections panel has a minor change, the profile-based chromatic aberration does not have a slider; it is on or off and is independent of whether the Profile Corrections are enabled or disabled. They seem to be pretty confident of the way it works at Adobe to remove the slider. Nice to know that. I would have liked to see that in the manual corrections panel since it is not tied to the profile, but that is a minor issue. The chromatic aberration sliders are gone from the Manual control of the lens corrections as well. Also gone art the lens vignetting sliders. The Effects and Camera Calibration panels round up the tool panels with no change in them.

But to be fair - I just tested this on / off option on my old images taken with cheap Tamron 18-200 where CA was real distaster and it works very well - maybe better that manual sliders.

ShadySue

« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2012, 14:45 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\
Is that in the beta for CS6, or is it 5.5?
Both CS5 and Elements 10 have the manual chromatic aberration sliders in ACR 6.6.

lagereek

« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2012, 14:48 »
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Both ACR and LR,  will clip the red and yellow channels, Canon as well as Nikon. Both NX and DPP, are optimized for their raw conversions.

« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2012, 14:49 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\
Is that in the beta for CS6, or is it 5.5?
Both CS5 and Elements 10 have the manual chromatic aberration sliders in ACR 6.6.

I have CS5 and I had CA sliders but there was some Adobe Raw update week or two ago and sliders are gone. There is some discussion on Adobe Forum but it's down for maintenance now.

ShadySue

« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2012, 15:37 »
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I just found out that after last update of Adobe Raw - manual chromatic aberration slider controls are gone. According to Adobe Forums I'm not the only one - I'm afraid that it's not a bug but a feature  :-\
Is that in the beta for CS6, or is it 5.5?
Both CS5 and Elements 10 have the manual chromatic aberration sliders in ACR 6.6.

I have CS5 and I had CA sliders but there was some Adobe Raw update week or two ago and sliders are gone. There is some discussion on Adobe Forum but it's down for maintenance now.
Sh*t, maybe they're trying to force us to buy Lightroom AS WELL as PS, whether we really want its features or not.
Hope it's a mistake. I'm glad I didn't get/see the invitation to update RAW. Odd, I've had  updates to pdf in the past week.
Tx for the warning.

« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 15:53 by jm »

ShadySue

« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2012, 16:06 »
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That's interesting about the different types of CA. I have noticed, as I guess everyone has, that some kinds of CA are easy to fix and others are almost impossible. The fully-finished product may well get it all sorted.
I don't usually dive in to betas, I'm a classic 'slow adopter'!
Tx for the links.

« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2012, 16:20 »
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If you are shooting Canon cameras and their own lenses why aren't you using Canon Digital Photo Professional, which is a disk that came with your camera?

I routinely correct for CA and lens distortion with DPP and then just process via photoshop.

« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2012, 16:58 »
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That's interesting about the different types of CA. I have noticed, as I guess everyone has, that some kinds of CA are easy to fix and others are almost impossible. The fully-finished product may well get it all sorted.
I don't usually dive in to betas, I'm a classic 'slow adopter'!
Tx for the links.

It didn't look like beta, it was just another Adobe product update. When I look at "about CR" it doesn't look like beta either. But after short testing it seems it really works well.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2012, 18:13 by jm »

WarrenPrice

« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2012, 18:14 »
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If you are shooting Canon cameras and their own lenses why aren't you using Canon Digital Photo Professional, which is a disk that came with your camera?

I routinely correct for CA and lens distortion with DPP and then just process via photoshop.

I bought the Canon after the Nikons, BD.  I've always used PSE for organizing and editing.  Didn't see any reason to use a different SW package for each -- until I ran into the CA problem.  Plus, I copied the following from DPP help:

Correcting Lens Aberration
You can easily make corrections to drops in peripheral illumination, distortions in the subject, and color blur which occur by the physical characteristics of the lens or slightly remaining aberration. Please note that you can only correct RAW images which have been taken with the compatible cameras and lenses. JPEG or TIFF images cannot be corrected.


The bold part is why I asked for help.

« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2012, 19:13 »
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Sorry, I obviously was behind the curve

WarrenPrice

« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2012, 20:02 »
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All ideas and recommendations appreciated. 
Looking like returning to RAW processing may be best answer.

lagereek

« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2012, 00:21 »
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All ideas and recommendations appreciated. 
Looking like returning to RAW processing may be best answer.

Warren!  once an image in jpg or tiff, no! it cant be corrected for CA, unless a hell of a lot of "fine tuning" in PS, takes ages. Use Canons DPP and shoot in RAW, only there can you effectivly remove CA or fringing, ( not the same though).

Binuscan and Barco, have got CA removers, mainly for the film industry but I doubt you want to fork out 5K, for these programs. Also, for any raw conversions, forget the generalist converters such as ACR and LR,  stick to the camera-makers own converter.

« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2012, 02:34 »
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I use Elements with the PTLens plug in to correct CA.  It's only $25 and does a great job.
http://epaperpress.com/ptlens/

lagereek

« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2012, 03:18 »
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I use Elements with the PTLens plug in to correct CA.  It's only $25 and does a great job.
http://epaperpress.com/ptlens/


Actually, thats a good plug-in,  but can it be used as a stand-alone application?

PhotoDuneMicrostock Insider

 

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