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« Reply #400 on: January 12, 2018, 14:51 »
0

stocksy content is like cavan,offset,getty,corbis (nowgone), arcangel,westend and hundreds of other macro agencies. Some of these have a typical look to set them apart, while others are generalists and have several artistically styled collections. But it is all traditional macrostock.



Thanks for the all information you provided, very useful. What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy? Can you tell about sellings and content needs if it's possible :)


« Reply #401 on: January 12, 2018, 14:53 »
0
I just the expected generic rejection. Oh well...  ::)
that's sad ((((

I'm still waiting and in fear  :-[

« Reply #402 on: January 12, 2018, 16:11 »
+3

stocksy content is like cavan,offset,getty,corbis (nowgone), arcangel,westend and hundreds of other macro agencies. Some of these have a typical look to set them apart, while others are generalists and have several artistically styled collections. But it is all traditional macrostock.



Thanks for the all information you provided, very useful. What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy? Can you tell about sellings and content needs if it's possible :)

gettyimages is a one stop shop for literally EVERYTHING. Any kind of style, any kind of content. And apparently their best customers also have access to all the istock content as well from the inside. That is why on istock you sometimes see a Getty sale.

It is like Amazon or ebay.

But the customer has to then go through millions and millions of files. They do offer a large variety of themed "collections" and their customer service will also put together a lightbox if you tell them what you need. This personal service is basically what you are paying for.

Together with their editorial content they must have several hundred million files and are the largest database of the industry. They have over 200 partners that feed them content, its a huge place. They used to have sales offices across the globe as well, not sure how many they have now and they used to have thousands of employees, again not sure how many survived the various restructurings they did.

Stocksy is one of many small agencies with a certain "look" and often a certain type of content. The advantage is that you can freely mix and match any file from stocksy with others from the collection. To a certain extent it feels like it was all done by one studio or one just one art director. This saves the customer A LOT of time.

In my opinion stocksy is excellent at ethical people stock. Gay lifestyle, minority communities, lots of very, very interesting character faces. Lots of other beautiful stuff course, food, travel...

But it is not a one stop shop. If you need some design elements, backgrounds, objects on white...not there. Overfiltered crazy images...not there...The stereotypical "thumbs up" people grinning design element...not there...and also what is very trendy in other places "ugly realism", i.e. images in the visual language of "normal people"...not there...every image on stocksy is extremly professional and many images would easily win competitions.

It is stunningly beautiful collection, very carefully curated.

But if you look at all the things you can do and sell in the world of stock, I would say it is 1% of what you can do. But that 1%, they do  that exceptionally well.

Other places like Offset or Westend61, Arcangel, Tetra, Plainpictures also have a very distinctive "look". But very different from stocksy.

All of them are high quality macrostock.

So as a customer if you have a project, you will probably look at Getty first and then depending on the style and the look you need you can browse these "themed" high quality agencies.

Some agencies specialize in a certain content - only medical images, only food (stockfood), only images from a certain country or region, only images and videos done with drones etc...

There are hundreds and hundreds of these small agencies.

But looking from outside you cannot really tell how much money you can make. Just like the list price on getty doesnt tell you that they sell their 600 dollar files for 60 cents or less to high volume customers.

stocksy is a coop, artist are coowners. they are very fair trade pay out 50% plus bonuses and have a very welcoming and loving vibe from the inside.

But they get tons of applications and only a small number of places are open every year.

However, they are not the only Macrostock agency or Macro portal. There really are a lot of places.

But getting accepted in macro is one challenge, then getting files accepted the next, because the editors edit for "artistic style" to make it fit the "theme" of their agency and then...you have to wait to see sales. In the macrostock world it is very common that customers only pay every three months or even later. Many images are returned and then suddenly money is deducted and if you are working with a distributor then it might take 18 months or longer for the first sales to appear in your account.

Macro is a very slow world, individual sales can be a lot higher but can also be lower than on microstock...2 cents...or several hundred dollars up to thousands of dollars for special licenses.

And since you first have to heavily self edit a series and then the editors might cut that in half...it is very hard to predict if you  make more money on macro than non exclusively on micro.

But personally I believe it is good to have exposure to all worlds, in themes, in style and in customer groups.

However Gettyimages is facing stiff competition from Shutterstock and Adobe. Fotolia has always had a large macrostock section, but the micro artist usually dont have access to that. Now with the money from Adobe I would expect them to grow that very strongly, especially if they start adding Editorial.

Shutterstock has Offset which looks like a small collection, but apparently they have in house solutions where customers get a macro style service and also pay much more for the files. We see that when we suddenly get 120 dollars for a file that usually sells for 30 cents.

But I dont know if they are planning to expand their premium section or if they just want to focus on normal Shutterstock.

So most likely the macro world in the future will not be just getty (very large) and hundreds of smaller places, but there will be a few more large players.

Sorry for the long rant, maybe it is useful to some of you.

I like Macro, they  take a lot of files normal micros would never accept and the beautiful collections are great for visual inspiration as well.

But you need a lot of patience and unfortunately nobody can tell you in advance which agency will work best for you.

So if stocksy doesnt take you, maybe have a look at a few others if you are interested in macro. And you can always apply again next year.


« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 16:36 by cobalt »

« Reply #403 on: January 12, 2018, 16:24 »
+4
" What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy?"

Also, Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity. Meaning everything you submit there is exclusive (and the whole series) until the end of time, unless you completely quit your contract.  Problem is, you don't know what they'll take until they review it.  You submit 100 images from a shoot and they take 5, you just wasted your time, and you can't do anything else with that content.

« Reply #404 on: January 12, 2018, 16:38 »
+1
Very important point! You cannot deactivate files or a series from getty if it doesnt sell.

On istock the same, no deactivation of individual files unless you end the contract and delete everything. But if you are non exclusive with istock, at least you can sell your content elsewhere.

Once you give them content...it is theirs...

« Reply #405 on: January 12, 2018, 18:43 »
+1
" What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy?"

Also, Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity. Meaning everything you submit there is exclusive (and the whole series) until the end of time, unless you completely quit your contract.  Problem is, you don't know what they'll take until they review it.  You submit 100 images from a shoot and they take 5, you just wasted your time, and you can't do anything else with that content.

If you must remain bitter after all this time, please, please, please stop spreading misinformation. The above statement is not true at all Sean.

« Reply #406 on: January 12, 2018, 18:45 »
0
Can you deactivate individual files and series from Gettyimages?

When did that change happen?

That would be a very drastic change. I have many friends with content that is not selling and they canˋt take it down and sell it elsewhere.

I mean, trying to figure out which content sells best where is a bigger challenge than shooting.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 18:49 by cobalt »

« Reply #407 on: January 12, 2018, 20:37 »
+4
" What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy?"

Also, Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity. Meaning everything you submit there is exclusive (and the whole series) until the end of time, unless you completely quit your contract.  Problem is, you don't know what they'll take until they review it.  You submit 100 images from a shoot and they take 5, you just wasted your time, and you can't do anything else with that content.

If you must remain bitter after all this time, please, please, please stop spreading misinformation. The above statement is not true at all Sean.

I would love to hear what part is misinformation.  Please, clue us all in.  BTW, I can be bitter, but that's the same thing I would have said five years ago.

Also, btw, don't accuse me of lying about something knowingly.  I'll appreciate your apology on that, and then for contradicting ( I think ) my information unless you have proof.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 20:46 by Sean Locke Photography »

« Reply #408 on: January 12, 2018, 20:56 »
+1
" What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy?"

Also, Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity. Meaning everything you submit there is exclusive (and the whole series) until the end of time, unless you completely quit your contract.  Problem is, you don't know what they'll take until they review it.  You submit 100 images from a shoot and they take 5, you just wasted your time, and you can't do anything else with that content.

If you must remain bitter after all this time, please, please, please stop spreading misinformation. The above statement is not true at all Sean.

I would love to hear what part is misinformation.  Please, clue us all in.  BTW, I can be bitter, but that's the same thing I would have said five years ago.

Not sure what kind of contract you have/had with Getty, but they only require image exclusive and don't want similars sent elsewhere. It's always been that way. I have a Getty contract and send my work to a few agencies.

Is Stocksy not the same? My understanding is that Stocksy wants series exclusive and you can't submit elsewhere from that series. Correct me if I am wrong on that.

The way you worded it sounds like submitting to Getty is tantamount to servitude.

Now if you were meaning Istock, then yes it is rather a unilateral arrangement whereas all RF is in a strangle hold for all agencies. That works for me sort of... I get enough on S+ which equates more or less double dipping... my better work gets mirrored over and my lesser work stays at Istock.

I also think Getty and Istock are less tolerant to the frequent emotional mood swings of the activate-deactivate-activate-deactivate hissy fit crowd so common in microstock.

I was not implying your were lying, you don't seem the type, quite the opposite actually.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 21:01 by Clair Voyant »

« Reply #409 on: January 12, 2018, 21:06 »
+2
"Not sure what kind of contract you have/had with Getty, but they only require image exclusive and don't want similars sent elsewhere. It's always been that way."

That's exactly what I said.

« Reply #410 on: January 12, 2018, 21:26 »
+1
"Not sure what kind of contract you have/had with Getty, but they only require image exclusive and don't want similars sent elsewhere. It's always been that way."

That's exactly what I said.

"Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity."  is what you said. And I have never seen a Getty contract like that.

I noticed you did not reply to my understanding of Stocksy having a similar requirement "series exclusive". How is that any different from Getty?
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 21:28 by Clair Voyant »

« Reply #411 on: January 12, 2018, 21:30 »
+2
Clair you implied that content on Getty can be deactivated. It cant.

So if your series doesnt sell on Getty it is dead. The only way to remove anything is to remove the entire portfolio and end the istock or getty contracts.

I have a lot of content that was on either istock and getty that never sold that now has become bestsellers elsewhere.

On stocksy, like on nearly every other agency you can deactivate a series if you want to. They dont tie you down.

If you enjoy having files that dont sell and dont mind losing money, well that is your choice. What percentage of your port is not selling? 30%? 50? How many are dead files?

Other artist prefer to maximise their income.

I also dont understand why you are so aggressive and insulting, both to Sean and other stock artists, calling them an overemotional crowd? To me it sounds like you are jealous that you cant make money of what is not selling in your port and try to distract yourself by blaming other people.

Anyway, if you are an istock exclusive and happy, what do you care about stocksy?

Our files never show up on Getty through a distribution deal, so these files never compete with yours.

Shutterstock and Adobe have a strong effect on the sales of istock and getty, but stocksy and all the other small macrostock agencies are irrelevant.

Organic food stores dont affect walmarts or whatever is the large store in your area.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 21:41 by cobalt »

« Reply #412 on: January 12, 2018, 21:48 »
+2
"Also, Getty requires perpetual and undying loyalty exclusivity. Meaning everything you submit there is exclusive (and the whole series) until the end of time"

In the context of the second sentence I thought it was clear I was talking of image/series exclusivity, but I can see where it might be read as artist exclusivity.  Sorry.

« Reply #413 on: January 13, 2018, 11:03 »
0

stocksy content is like cavan,offset,getty,corbis (nowgone), arcangel,westend and hundreds of other macro agencies. Some of these have a typical look to set them apart, while others are generalists and have several artistically styled collections. But it is all traditional macrostock.



Thanks for the all information you provided, very useful. What can you tell about Getty compare to Stocksy? Can you tell about sellings and content needs if it's possible :)

gettyimages is a one stop shop for literally EVERYTHING. Any kind of style, any kind of content. And apparently their best customers also have access to all the istock content as well from the inside. That is why on istock you sometimes see a Getty sale.

It is like Amazon or ebay.

But the customer has to then go through millions and millions of files. They do offer a large variety of themed "collections" and their customer service will also put together a lightbox if you tell them what you need. This personal service is basically what you are paying for.

Together with their editorial content they must have several hundred million files and are the largest database of the industry. They have over 200 partners that feed them content, its a huge place. They used to have sales offices across the globe as well, not sure how many they have now and they used to have thousands of employees, again not sure how many survived the various restructurings they did.

Stocksy is one of many small agencies with a certain "look" and often a certain type of content. The advantage is that you can freely mix and match any file from stocksy with others from the collection. To a certain extent it feels like it was all done by one studio or one just one art director. This saves the customer A LOT of time.

In my opinion stocksy is excellent at ethical people stock. Gay lifestyle, minority communities, lots of very, very interesting character faces. Lots of other beautiful stuff course, food, travel...

But it is not a one stop shop. If you need some design elements, backgrounds, objects on white...not there. Overfiltered crazy images...not there...The stereotypical "thumbs up" people grinning design element...not there...and also what is very trendy in other places "ugly realism", i.e. images in the visual language of "normal people"...not there...every image on stocksy is extremly professional and many images would easily win competitions.

It is stunningly beautiful collection, very carefully curated.

But if you look at all the things you can do and sell in the world of stock, I would say it is 1% of what you can do. But that 1%, they do  that exceptionally well.

Other places like Offset or Westend61, Arcangel, Tetra, Plainpictures also have a very distinctive "look". But very different from stocksy.

All of them are high quality macrostock.

So as a customer if you have a project, you will probably look at Getty first and then depending on the style and the look you need you can browse these "themed" high quality agencies.

Some agencies specialize in a certain content - only medical images, only food (stockfood), only images from a certain country or region, only images and videos done with drones etc...

There are hundreds and hundreds of these small agencies.

But looking from outside you cannot really tell how much money you can make. Just like the list price on getty doesnt tell you that they sell their 600 dollar files for 60 cents or less to high volume customers.

stocksy is a coop, artist are coowners. they are very fair trade pay out 50% plus bonuses and have a very welcoming and loving vibe from the inside.

But they get tons of applications and only a small number of places are open every year.

However, they are not the only Macrostock agency or Macro portal. There really are a lot of places.

But getting accepted in macro is one challenge, then getting files accepted the next, because the editors edit for "artistic style" to make it fit the "theme" of their agency and then...you have to wait to see sales. In the macrostock world it is very common that customers only pay every three months or even later. Many images are returned and then suddenly money is deducted and if you are working with a distributor then it might take 18 months or longer for the first sales to appear in your account.

Macro is a very slow world, individual sales can be a lot higher but can also be lower than on microstock...2 cents...or several hundred dollars up to thousands of dollars for special licenses.

And since you first have to heavily self edit a series and then the editors might cut that in half...it is very hard to predict if you  make more money on macro than non exclusively on micro.

But personally I believe it is good to have exposure to all worlds, in themes, in style and in customer groups.

However Gettyimages is facing stiff competition from Shutterstock and Adobe. Fotolia has always had a large macrostock section, but the micro artist usually dont have access to that. Now with the money from Adobe I would expect them to grow that very strongly, especially if they start adding Editorial.

Shutterstock has Offset which looks like a small collection, but apparently they have in house solutions where customers get a macro style service and also pay much more for the files. We see that when we suddenly get 120 dollars for a file that usually sells for 30 cents.

But I dont know if they are planning to expand their premium section or if they just want to focus on normal Shutterstock.

So most likely the macro world in the future will not be just getty (very large) and hundreds of smaller places, but there will be a few more large players.

Sorry for the long rant, maybe it is useful to some of you.

I like Macro, they  take a lot of files normal micros would never accept and the beautiful collections are great for visual inspiration as well.

But you need a lot of patience and unfortunately nobody can tell you in advance which agency will work best for you.

So if stocksy doesnt take you, maybe have a look at a few others if you are interested in macro. And you can always apply again next year.

Thank you very much for such detailed post, i need time to think about everything you told.
But this "I like Macro, they  take a lot of files normal micros would never accept and the beautiful collections are great for visual inspiration as well" is strange, I have noticed it too. Why macro sites acceptance is much easier than micros?

« Reply #414 on: January 13, 2018, 13:21 »
+1
Because traditionally a macrostock picture would not be heavily edited in photoshop, they might add text, but usually it would be used as is in prints. The way it was done before digital existed.

But the files that graphic designers buy on microstock are often used in a large Photoshop file together with many other images, backgrounds, then it gets compressed, filtered etc...the files have to be able to hold up to quite a bit of digital abuse.

That is why from a technical quality perspective, the inspections were more stringent on micro than on Macrostock.

Especially in the beginning when digital was new and files were anyway quite small.

Today if you have a 40Mp file and if it is not that perfect at 100% it doesnt matter, you can always downsize it to get a higher quality if you really need it.

To make money on the micros with the cheap prices, artists favored very generic images that could be sold 50 000 times, over artsy, highly specific images that might only find a buyer once every 10 years.

That is why you find more artsy content on the macros, the higher price is supposed to help the artist survive the often very long wait to get a sale.

But today it all doesnt matter. the macros sell images for as low as 2 cents and the micros can surprise you with sales of 200 dollars for a normal photo.

The Micros also now have a very large reserve of beautiful artistic content and the Macros now have a ton of ugly looking amateur stock and also a lot of generic micro style images.

The lines have been very blurred.

Which means, you really have to try it to learn what sells. And maybe in your personal case artsy finds a lot of fans on Shutterstock, but never gets a sale on the macros.

Personally, I think your sales depend a lot on your upload volume. A lot more than on what you shoot. Because most agencies will favor the regular uploader and sending up files every week is usually the best you can do to help your portfolio.

ETA:

"Why macro sites acceptance is much easier than micros?"

Please keep in mind: they dont accept more files, they might very drastically cut into your files and just accept 2 files instead of the 8 you sent in. The other 6 cant be sent elsewhere, neither can the rest of the content from the shoot that is maybe just second best, so you didnt upload it, but if the series was indie you could wring every last cent out of it, any way you like.

But they are more open with technical imperfections. If it is not fully in focus, if it has some camera shake, if it has some grain or artifacts, if the visual message of the image works, technicals are secondary.

Again the most important: you will not earn more money by sending files exclusively to a macro.

You might make a lot less. Simply because if you are independent and have a large series, you can gradually release it, sometimes over several years over many different agencies. You can also process a series with a new style to bring it back to life, the way many people are now reprocessing files with lensflare filters or mobile stock apps to give them a modern vibe. You can also upload your content to any new agency that comes along.

But for some people having an exclusive partner is the easiest thing for them, they just take pictures and let someone else do the rest. For series exclusivity that can be a good deal, because then you can still work with many places and have just some of your content exclusive somewhere.

 
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 13:55 by cobalt »

« Reply #415 on: January 13, 2018, 14:07 »
0
one question i understand stocksy is exclusive photos , but what means series...
i mean for travel photography an entire trip is exclusive? or for food a complete food setup?
i have for example took photos of a group of animal in antartica...i think most are normal but 2 standout, i left them apart for a good macro agency. the rest of the day of shooting i can upload to micro or other macro agency?
i understand for a model shooting all the shooting must be sold only through stocksy...

what confuse me is for other theme. considering i have seen a portfolio of an artist in stocksy and in shutter stock, and while i not see any identical photos, she's clearly sending to micro similar images shot with the same setup.

« Reply #416 on: January 13, 2018, 15:47 »
+6
Usually a shooting would be what you do in one day at one location. A group of people cooking together in the kitchen. If you then do another shooting the next day with the same people, but in different clothes in an office, that would be another shoot.

I am not sure how series exclusivity works with travel or landscape imagery. But on stocksy that is easy to solve, you just send the editing team a link with everything from the trip and ask them to help you divide it into a proper series and they will tell you what to do if you are unsure. You dont need to process all the files first.

This is the advantage if working with a small community. And then gradually you will understand what they want and then you can do it yourself.

On other agencies that don't offer personal support, you can ask the community or forums or in their facebook groups for advice.

The important thing about series exclusivity is that the customer should not get upset when he/she find "the rest of the series" on another plattform. They are making their buying decision in good faith that this is the complete series that they can chose from.

Obviously exclusivity of landmarks like the Eiffel Tower etc...are difficult. You can try doing something visually different for an exclusive agency.

On the micros (and now eyeem) I have this image of Cologne cathedral, nothing special about it:

https://www.eyeem.com/p/82783951

On stocksy I have this:

https://www.stocksy.com/65815

On eyeem I have this (from the time when eyeem was exclusive):

https://www.eyeem.com/p/69701912

or this

https://www.eyeem.com/p/87221017, both with filter effects.

etc...

So there are many ways to make the same location, situation etc visually different and thus non-similar.

If in doubt, ask around.

ETA: one thing to keep in mind is that stocksy is very interested in your ability to tell a story with your series

A group of people meets up at the camp site, they set up their gear, have a coffee together and look at the map and the trail where they want to go hiking in the afternoon. Maybe they change their clothes, grab a backpack, put on mountain shoes, then they go hiking, at various locations they stop to admire the scenery, a couple in the group will have a private moment, they reach the summit, small celebration...then as it gets dark, they move back down, sit by the fireplace cook and eat, go to bed...

Its a cliche story, but along that idea you can organize a shooting over a week end, which elements do you need to tell your story, is it more about the individual characters or the specialiy of the location, which time of year, is there a special environmental angle (they dont use plastic and collect their trash), is there a romantic story, a family story...etc...

On the basis of these stories, it becomes clear what is essential for your series.  And also how to use the same location and the same group of people to tell different stories and series which would then be non exclusive.

Again, just to develop a story like this on stocksy you can ask the art directors to help you develop a mood board. And of course you can ask the community for help when you are preparing a shooting.

And maybe that is one more difference between macro and micro, you will find more people who design a shooting along a story on the macros than on the micros, because you have more professionally trained photographers there. But this concept also works on the micros. If you have a story in your series, it is more valuable for the customer.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 16:17 by cobalt »

JaenStock

  • Bad images can sell.
« Reply #417 on: January 14, 2018, 07:24 »
+2
Thanks Cobalt.

We need more posts like yours in this community, happy to see a not complain, repeated question, sarcastic or crying post.

By the way, I think you must try upload more photos to Stocksy. I try upload photos to all agencies I am... but sometimes is difficult choice where put images.



« Reply #418 on: January 14, 2018, 08:17 »
+1
I was waiting for them to open the video section, my videos are much weaker than my photos, so there is no point in uploading the photos to later discover they wont take the videos. And in 2017 i did a lot with friend that could have maybe worked for stocksy - seniors, groups with up to 12 different ethnicities...but unfortunately she didnt get in :( . However, no problem for her though, she has now found another solution. And for video we can still work together.

Its just what we did is now for other places.

For video and people shootings I like to work with a partner, so this year I want to try and find people who are on stocksy and are interested in doing video.

I should probably also upload just normal photos, but my photo production has dropped a lot and what i do is usually "ugly realism" which is the opposite of the polished stocksy style.

But yes, I certainly want to grow my portfolio.

In video there is so much to learn, though, it will take quite a bit of time before I reach a video level that works for them. But I love video, I wont give up :)

ETA: for interested parties reading...I still have some projects in the summer where I will also take photos...so I have no plans to only torture you with my amateur videos :)

Its just see stocksys biggest strength in the ethical people stock. That is why I would go there as a customer. But it is not something I shoot every day, I have to build up a network of suitable models first.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 09:13 by cobalt »

« Reply #419 on: January 14, 2018, 08:52 »
+1

I just the expected generic rejection. Oh well...  ::)

Rejection arrived here too :(

cobalt, greats posts, love the micro-macro differences part!




« Reply #420 on: January 14, 2018, 08:58 »
0

I just the expected generic rejection. Oh well...  ::)

Rejection arrived here too :(

cobalt, greats posts, love the micro-macro differences part!

Are you kidding?   :-\  I love your work and I could totally see it on Stocksy...I don't really get what they are looking for! One day (I think) I can see the typical Stocksy-style but then I discover some work on their site that doesn't look like their style AT ALL!

« Reply #421 on: January 14, 2018, 09:01 »
0

I just the expected generic rejection. Oh well...  ::)

Rejection arrived here too :(

cobalt, greats posts, love the micro-macro differences part!

when you applied for stocksy? the date of application ?

« Reply #422 on: January 14, 2018, 09:03 »
+1
Thank you!

I am developing a new workshop that can be attended by anyone in Cologne, instead of just the students of  Fotoakademie.

So the questions here are helping me a lot with preparing the workshop.

:)

If you are in Germany, it will be a two day workshop focussing on finding a very personal strategy in micro/macrostock. Trying to find a path in all the very confusing options.

Ill show real results from my own sales, explain the differences of macro and micro, explain current trends and themes and will try to give a very realistic idea of how much time you need to invest to establish a reliable income.

When you start out in stock there is so much to learn, but the situation of the professional photographer who wants to do stock between assignments is very different from the amateur who likes to go on holidays and wants some money for gear. or maybe a pensioner who loves photography and wants to build up a steady income stream and then pass along the portfolios to the family. Build up passive income. Or the creative artist who is looking for additional income instead of only print and gallery sales.

The confusion about how the stock market works is extremly frustrating. So I hope I can help with that.

(ETA: sorry for the little self promo )
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 09:19 by cobalt »

« Reply #423 on: January 14, 2018, 09:06 »
0
but then I discover some work on their site that doesn't look like their style AT ALL!

Which is probably why they got in. Just because stocksy has a certain look, doesnt mean that is all they do. It is a living, breathing agency and they will expand and adapt to meet customer needs.

maybe by now they have enough people their standard look.

« Reply #424 on: January 14, 2018, 09:12 »
0
Are you kidding?   :-\  I love your work and I could totally see it on Stocksy...I don't really get what they are looking for! One day (I think) I can see the typical Stocksy-style but then I discover some work on their site that doesn't look like their style AT ALL!

I think my portfolio problem was obvious, no people in it lol! Just kidding. It would be really nice to get some kind of feedback, but i understand they have too many applications to go through and it would take their time away.

But it's been almost 3,5 months so the waiting got me a bit excited too early ;D corinna, I hope you didn't get the rejection yet. It would be nice to have someone from forum get in!  ;)


 

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