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Author Topic: Stocksy's call to artist  (Read 42114 times)

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« Reply #100 on: June 13, 2014, 20:59 »
+1
Here's an image on Stocksy that really blows my mind.

http://www.stocksy.com/224056

Can anybody explain the appeal of an image like that?


I'm not going to comment on this image, but to answer your question, no, I cannot.


« Reply #101 on: June 13, 2014, 21:02 »
+12
Really?  We need to start picking out images you don't like?

Let's not start that in this thread.

« Reply #102 on: June 13, 2014, 22:49 »
0
Here's an image on Stocksy that really blows my mind.

http://www.stocksy.com/224056


I think that sentence is two words too long.

« Reply #103 on: June 13, 2014, 23:48 »
+1
Here's an image on Stocksy that really blows my mind.

http://www.stocksy.com/224056

Can anybody explain the appeal of an image like that?


I'm Stocksy big fan. I don't get that too. I have seen this style several times. The most memorable one is on latest edition of Fool Magazine, a blurred portrait of a chef, but that's more tasteful done than this photo.

« Reply #104 on: June 14, 2014, 00:12 »
0
what should be the minimum size of 25 sample images ? and as it is for evaluation purpose so can one send images which are already on any other site ?

I'm not sure about the number of sample images but yes, you can submit images for your application that are already on other sites.

Just to understand this better. The sample images after review will get approved for sale (like SS) or they are just part of the application to get approved (like iS where the sample images need to get submitted again for getting into sale).

« Reply #105 on: June 14, 2014, 00:28 »
0
what should be the minimum size of 25 sample images ? and as it is for evaluation purpose so can one send images which are already on any other site ?

I'm not sure about the number of sample images but yes, you can submit images for your application that are already on other sites.

Just to understand this better. The sample images after review will get approved for sale (like SS) or they are just part of the application to get approved (like iS where the sample images need to get submitted again for getting into sale).

I think it should be just part of application like IS if stocksy has not changed the rule what were there last year, so following some old stocksy threads here, its for application purpose and if you are accepted as stocksy photographer once, you have to submit again so that they can be reviewed before including to the stocksy collection. If its not so then any stocksy member kindly correct me.
And i dont see anything wrong in the image posted in above link, its just that microstock has changed our view and taste for photography. I liked Michael's recent post about stocksy in his blog
When I submitted my application yesterday, it stated the files must be at least 5.8 MP..

Thanks Tanya. Am I reading it right.. at least "5.8" MP ?

« Reply #106 on: June 14, 2014, 02:48 »
+6
I like the idea of Stocksy being difficult to get into. If at some point I make it there as a contributor, it will give me a great sense of accomplishment. I certainly wont disrespect another photographers work because of my own failure. I'll keep trying to better my own skills for the next opportunity.

shudderstok

« Reply #107 on: June 14, 2014, 03:06 »
+10
Really?  We need to start picking out images you don't like?

Let's not start that in this thread.

and you have never singled out an image before?

« Reply #108 on: June 14, 2014, 04:21 »
+2
Can anybody explain the appeal of an image like that?


I can explain that image. Its a contemporary and impressionistic take on the snapshot aesthetic. It looks like a casual misfire - which is to say that it looks typical.

It would not look out of place in fashion layout or on tumblr. And that fits with how she is dressed, the texting etc. It looks like she is hanging-out, nothing much to do.

(Or change the blue for red and youve got something which could almost be a still from Dont Look Now. And maybe it is a bit sinister too.)

gillian

  • *Gillian*

« Reply #109 on: June 14, 2014, 04:26 »
+3
^agree, although it's not my style either (i'm just way too uptight to shoot a blur like this), this is exactly what Stocksy does well: pushing the boundaries on what is stock, on what is trending. It does that very well. Jen's blog post is excellent, and has reminded me to go back to my own aesethic a little more.

Good luck to those who apply and I look forward to seeing you in the forums over there. It's a very different place. :)

« Reply #110 on: June 14, 2014, 05:23 »
+4
Good luck to those who apply and I look forward to seeing you in the forums over there. It's a very different place. :)
Sure a different place - but probably not independent and free as here 8)

« Reply #111 on: June 14, 2014, 07:12 »
0
what should be the minimum size of 25 sample images ? and as it is for evaluation purpose so can one send images which are already on any other site ?

I'm not sure about the number of sample images but yes, you can submit images for your application that are already on other sites.

Just to understand this better. The sample images after review will get approved for sale (like SS) or they are just part of the application to get approved (like iS where the sample images need to get submitted again for getting into sale).

I think it should be just part of application like IS if stocksy has not changed the rule what were there last year, so following some old stocksy threads here, its for application purpose and if you are accepted as stocksy photographer once, you have to submit again so that they can be reviewed before including to the stocksy collection. If its not so then any stocksy member kindly correct me.

Thanks gemmy12 ! Good to know !

jen

« Reply #112 on: June 14, 2014, 07:55 »
+2
Can anybody explain the appeal of an image like that?


I can explain that image. Its a contemporary and impressionistic take on the snapshot aesthetic. It looks like a casual misfire - which is to say that it looks typical.

It would not look out of place in fashion layout or on tumblr. And that fits with how she is dressed, the texting etc. It looks like she is hanging-out, nothing much to do.

(Or change the blue for red and youve got something which could almost be a still from Dont Look Now. And maybe it is a bit sinister too.)


I like this explanation.  Here are a couple examples of how blur might be used in design:

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/366550857141228276/
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/366550857141234327/
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/366550857141228008/

cuppacoffee

« Reply #113 on: June 14, 2014, 08:16 »
0
Here's an image on Stocksy that really blows my mind.

http://www.stocksy.com/224056

Can anybody explain the appeal of an image like that?


Article for psychology journal on identity or mood disorders, medical article on eye disorders like the need for cataract surgery, law enforcement power point presentation on witness protection programs, etc. Yes, it would be easy to manipulate any photo of a person in focus but not everyone is a photographer or has the software to do that so it might be a choice for an editorial article.

« Reply #114 on: June 14, 2014, 08:33 »
0
Jen, bunhill & cuppacoffee, thanks for the illustrations and commentary on use options. I was wondering too how that type of image would be used and your commentary was enlightening. 

« Reply #115 on: June 25, 2014, 12:45 »
+2
I filled out the basic application right away but just uploaded 62 images to Stocksy today - keeping my fingers crossed. I thought I was done and then decided to upload a few more & am so glad I did since even after it gives you that cool cover page and says you've met the minimum requirement, you're not done. When I went back to upload a couple more that didn't transfer into lightroom properly, I got a green banner asking if I was ready to submit. soooooo glad I saw that!

I really like their aesthetic and hope I get a chance to join them. Most blurs land in the trash but on occasion a blur can be a happy accident. Have you looked at the rest of his (quite excellent) portfolio?

Sometimes I worry that shooting stock makes me forget that there's much more to good photography than perfect focus - and there's a need for all kinds of "stock."  I licensed a photo to Smithsonian magazine back in February - it was up on my site but I didn't think of it as stock - and I shoot commercial stuff as well as photojournalism - but to me it was simply a photo I took for the love of it. Well, their photo editor loved it too. My stock portfolio is not very typical, so hoping this could be the right fit for me . .  .
    of course, that means I'm hoping They think my work is the right fit for them! 
« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 12:50 by wordplanet »

« Reply #116 on: June 25, 2014, 14:46 »
0
If the wait for a reply to your application is overwhelming, you can check by going back to the "call to artist" page and click on the "apply with Stocksy" button. It informed me my application is waiting for review and I would be notified by email after the editors had time to check it.

« Reply #117 on: June 25, 2014, 15:56 »
+1
In the application process it asks for social media links. Is this important? I don't really put my images on social media because if I feel I have a good image I will try to license it rather than giving it away for free.

« Reply #118 on: June 25, 2014, 16:07 »
+7
In the application process it asks for social media links. Is this important? I don't really put my images on social media because if I feel I have a good image I will try to license it rather than giving it away for free.

It isn't about seeing what images you are giving away for free (or if you're doing that at all).  Part of the mindset and money saving facets of the co-operative is that you should make an effort to help promote the site through your contacts.

« Reply #119 on: July 03, 2014, 12:04 »
+2
Here's an amazing blur on Stocksy i found in the newest photos as I was taking a look today - Love looking through people's portfolios there, the personal feel of many of the images makes them seem more like assignment work.
http://www.stocksy.com/207756

Valo

« Reply #120 on: July 03, 2014, 15:33 »
+3
I am in the understanding that Stocksy wants the complete package when onboarding a new photographer. They want to see your progress, they want to see your style, your commitment to help promote the site and of course your images need to be a fit. You are supposed to help out in their forums, and help promote Stocksy through your own social media channels. It seems that shooting specifically for Stocksy is not always successful as they would like to onboard photographers that already shoot in a certain style. I guess there is always room to change your own style but it would a bit of time to fully adapt a new style to get to a point where it looks 'natural' or 'native'.

As I am on the fence which direction to take my own photography, I am contemplating on changing my style and work on becoming a Stocksy photographer. I do appreciate the fact that it might take me till the next round in 2015 to be fully ready to join them as I assume their 2014 slots are being filled rapidly.

Shelma1

« Reply #121 on: July 03, 2014, 17:02 »
+4
Perhaps I'll get a lot of minuses for this, but if contributors are expected to help promote the site they should get much more than 50%.

Valo

« Reply #122 on: July 03, 2014, 17:12 »
+7
As I understand it, they keep the cost of marketing down, so that they can pay 50% on regular sales, 100% on EL sales and share profits at the end of the financial year. Sounds like a fair deal to me. At least it sounds better than 3% (Deposit) 5% (Fotolia) 15% (Istock) 20% (Getty) in my sincere and honest opinion.

« Reply #123 on: July 03, 2014, 17:15 »
+4
They are getting more than 50%.

They get 100% for all extended licenses and the profits are shared with the artists as well.

stocksy has a very small team. If you dont want to help promote the cooperative, then maybe it is better to work with a place that pays out less, but does it all for you.

But 500 or more people regularly posting on google+,facebook,writing blog articles about their work or their collegues,pinning their favorite stocksy images to pin interest... and always adding links to stocksy images is really helpful. stocksy of course advertises in magazines etc...but community marketing is a powerful tool.

It also helps to build community interaction, to work together as a team when we promote each others work.

« Reply #124 on: July 04, 2014, 12:28 »
+9
Jasmin (cobolt) and Valo are right on the money. +1

Stocksy is a co-op, so their expectation that their photographers help promote the site certainly makes sense. Social media marketing, although it is a very new phenomenon, has already become such an accepted part of our lives. Their expectation that those who are part of the co-op tweet, pin, and share on facebook, G+ and elsewhere seems like a very reasonable requirement.

And given their success in such a short time, it seems to be working.

Personally, I really hope I get in. I'd be happy to blog about it, tweet, like photos, etc.

Yesterday, I watched the stocksy awards and was impressed by the sense of community and the founders' commitment to their fellow photographers. Bruce Livingstone made millions, and now he's using some of that wealth to help the photography community, which is really great. He could just sit back and enjoy his wealth. But instead, he has a stake in this new venture.

Expecting the photographers who get on board to have a stake in it as well, to do more than just upload photos, I think, is a good idea. Being passive members of microstock communities after all, helped bring things to their current state, and fighting back as a community against some of the more egregious things that have happened has made a difference. It has shown that if we photographers want to be treated fairly, we need to do more than just complain. Taking an active role in a fair trade site, helping to support and market it seems like no-brainer. And having hundreds of other like-minded photographers out there promoting the site by tweeting, sharing, etc., getting 50% to 100% of each sale, and getting a percentage of the year-end profits seems like a fair deal to me.

As photographers we need to also be business people if we want to succeed. Successful photographers like Livingstone and Brianna Wettlaufer understand that.

Stocksy is one club I'd really like to join.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2014, 12:37 by wordplanet »


 

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