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Author Topic: rejection: Images too soft  (Read 2452 times)

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« on: November 25, 2007, 13:42 »
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I have applied to SX and got rejected with the message your images are too soft. The same images have been accepted at IS and DT. I do not sharpen my images. The settings on my Canon 40D and Rebel Xti are Standard picture. That automatically  gives Amount 25, Radius 1,
Detail 25. What should I do to get accepted at SX?

vphoto


« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2007, 14:13 »
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You need to sharpen your images.

It sounds like you're trying to avoid doing post-production work on your shots by letting the camera do the work for you - not a very good strategy for producing commercial imagery.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2007, 14:14 by sharply_done »

« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2007, 14:17 »
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sharply_done,

what should  camera settings be ? Neutral ?

vphoto

« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2007, 14:30 »
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I now use in camera sharpening whit my D200, after I notice about the same thing...It was always seem to be out of focus at 200 and 300%. After a week or two, some people on other forums was talking about if the D300 was going to sharpen more than the D200, like Canon do.

It was a problem for them. Personally, I'm not a great photoshoper and I use an old version of photoshop (6.0). The sharpen filter in photoshop 6.0 do a poor job. So unless someone give me a better version, I use and only use this in camera setting to help my pictures been selected. I know there are probably some better way to sharpen a picture, but this one seem to work.

« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2007, 15:43 »
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I agree with sharply_done
I'd never let the camera to do the post processing.(as sharpening a part of it)

I think even a shareware would do a better job than the camera (GIMP ie)
I actually try to stay away from sharpening unless it's absolutely necessary and when there is a need for it I try to keep it at  a minimum level.

sticking with  certain aperture values between f8-f16 would help to get sharper images and obviously one major solution is using a better lenses if possible.I don't know what camera and lenses you use but if you are a Canoner using the kit lens (ef18- 55) I'd strongly recommend the famous ef 50mm f1.8 which will get you sharp enough photos on a very little budget.
good luck with your next attempt

 

« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2007, 18:02 »
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A certain amount of sharpening is often necessary as images staright from DSLR cameras are invariably soft due to the AA filter.

They also lack dynamic range.

I've found with my Nikon D200 that a normal levels adjustment changes the perceived sharpness of an image, presumably due to the increased contrast.

I would have thought that even Photoshop 6 had 'unsharp mask'.  This tool is often criticised and derided, but that's probably because people don't spend enough time learning how to use it.  Just changing the 'amount' isn't using it to its full advantage - the 'radius' and 'threshold' adjusters are powerful tools and can be used to create just the right amount of sharpness depending on whether one is trying to sharpen small details or a large scene.  Some time spent learning how to use 'unsharp mask' with a variety of different settings and a range of images will be time well spent.

Selective sharpening is also useful - for this I tend to use 'quick mask' but others probably have their own preferred system.

« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2007, 19:15 »
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I would have thought that even Photoshop 6 had 'unsharp mask'.  This tool is often criticised and derided, but that's probably because people don't spend enough time learning how to use it.  Just changing the 'amount' isn't using it to its full advantage - the 'radius' and 'threshold' adjusters are powerful tools and can be used to create just the right amount of sharpness depending on whether one is trying to sharpen small details or a large scene. 

Hatman, I also find it very useful.  Using PSP7, I don't have the "high pass" or something like that. 

As I don't understand the settings well, I have developed a very simple and subtle sharpening adjustment using unsharp mask in PSP.  I set radius and strength in the same number apart the decimal point (for example, radius=0.60 with strength=60 or radius=0.70 with strength=70), always keeping clipping at 1. 

I don't know if the paramenters are the same in PS, but do you use something very different? 

For my website, I use a more aggressive sharpening, but not in stock photography.

Regards,
Adelaide

digiology

« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2007, 01:07 »
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I would have thought that even Photoshop 6 had 'unsharp mask'.  This tool is often criticised and derided,

Really?? I thought "unsharp mask" was an industry standard (at least for print production). I always use this and never use the regular "sharpen" tool in photoshop. I have used "unsharp mask" for years and I am pretty sure it is available in PS6.

Microstock InsiderPhotoDune

 

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