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Author Topic: Generative AI Collection of links and important articles, videos, court cases  (Read 55671 times)

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« Reply #250 on: September 25, 2023, 10:13 »
0


Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #251 on: September 25, 2023, 10:45 »
0
getty announces their ai generator

https://www.theverge.com/2023/9/25/23884679/getty-ai-generative-image-platform-launch

Interesting. The company said any photos created with the tool will not be included in the Getty Images and iStock content libraries. Getty will pay creators if it uses their AI-generated image to train the current and future versions of the model. It will share revenues generated from the tool, allocating both a pro rata share in respect of every file and a share based on traditional licensing revenue.

« Reply #252 on: September 25, 2023, 10:55 »
+4
How do you create with pushing a button on a camera?

I do not know about you, maybe you are only doing snapshost, but my microstock photos are more than just "pushing a button".
It can easily take me an hour just setting up backdrops and lighing equipment and arrange photo props for one photo. Then taking the actual photos and editing them can easily take me up to 30 minutes per photo as well.
Now I can get the same result in 5 seconds with Midjourney....


And I already told the story once about how everyone constantly wants me to take photos of ther wedding, their child, their pet, their anniversary and when I offer to just give them my camera, then suddenly it seems to be more than "pushing a button" after all and they tell me they just can't make the photos look and I have to do it. So my "pushing abutton" seems to be different then their "pushing a button" after all?  I am so sick of my skill and effort in taking photos being downtalked whenever it suits someone, but when I tell people to just do it themselves it suddenly becomes an unieque skill only I seem to possess?
« Last Edit: September 25, 2023, 10:59 by Her Ugliness »

« Reply #253 on: September 25, 2023, 16:27 »
+1
How do you create with pushing a button on a camera?

I do not know about you, maybe you are only doing snapshost, but my microstock photos are more than just "pushing a button".
It can easily take me an hour just setting up backdrops and lighing equipment and arrange photo props for one photo. Then taking the actual photos and editing them can easily take me up to 30 minutes per photo as well.
Now I can get the same result in 5 seconds with Midjourney....


And I already told the story once about how everyone constantly wants me to take photos of ther wedding, their child, their pet, their anniversary and when I offer to just give them my camera, then suddenly it seems to be more than "pushing a button" after all and they tell me they just can't make the photos look and I have to do it. So my "pushing abutton" seems to be different then their "pushing a button" after all?  I am so sick of my skill and effort in taking photos being downtalked whenever it suits someone, but when I tell people to just do it themselves it suddenly becomes an unieque skill only I seem to possess?

keep doing what you do because it can never be like an AI generated image,I've never seen any of your content,but I'm sure you create exceptional work,and I'm sure you're much better than me at this,don't ask me how I know,but I'm 100% sure of this.

« Reply #254 on: September 25, 2023, 18:26 »
+1
How do you create with pushing a button on a camera?

I do not know about you, maybe you are only doing snapshost, but my microstock photos are more than just "pushing a button".
It can easily take me an hour just setting up backdrops and lighing equipment and arrange photo props for one photo. Then taking the actual photos and editing them can easily take me up to 30 minutes per photo as well.
Now I can get the same result in 5 seconds with Midjourney....


And I already told the story once about how everyone constantly wants me to take photos of ther wedding, their child, their pet, their anniversary and when I offer to just give them my camera, then suddenly it seems to be more than "pushing a button" after all and they tell me they just can't make the photos look and I have to do it. So my "pushing abutton" seems to be different then their "pushing a button" after all?  I am so sick of my skill and effort in taking photos being downtalked whenever it suits someone, but when I tell people to just do it themselves it suddenly becomes an unieque skill only I seem to possess?

Nah, that is all much too complicated for my little brain.

I just direct my camera at the world and happily and randomly press that button and upload what the camera sees all by itself to make all the money I make.

And of course if I use a more expensive camera, like my Leica M with Noctilux lens, then I get much better pictures and then I can feel like a "real" artist.

So working with ai is more mind intense for me because I have to think very hard how to organize my words and cannot get results by just entering a random word salad.

Still surprised why I get more sales for my random snapshot photos than for my ai, but it must be that the camera button has more artistic skills than my prompts.

« Reply #255 on: September 26, 2023, 03:22 »
0
Dall-e3 will have encrpyted watermarks

https://www.reddit.com/r/dalle2/comments/16sgvt3/fyi_content_credentials_in_dalle_3_images/

FYI. Content credentials in dall-e 3 images. Potential explanation for the disappearance of visible water mark
DALLE 3
I asked Bing chat about these things and this is what I got:
DALLE 3 content credentials are a new feature that Bing is introducing to ensure the authenticity and originality of the AI-generated images in Bing. Content credentials use cryptographic methods to add an invisible digital watermark to all AI-generated images in Bing, including the time and date of original creation. This way, users can verify the source and provenance of the images they see or create on Bing. Content credentials will also be supported by Paint and Microsoft Designer, two other applications that use DALLE 3 for image generation.
To decrypt and view the credentials for verifying authenticity, you need to use a third-party program that can access the encrypted credential files and display their content. One such program is CredentialsFileView from Nirsoft, which you can download for free from this link.
To use CredentialsFileView, you need to enter your Windows login password, which is required to decrypt the credential files. Then, the program will automatically detect and list all the credential files on your computer. You can click on each file to see its decrypted content in the lower pane of the program. The content will show the time and date of original creation, as well as the cryptographic signature that proves the authenticity of the image.
Another way to view the credentials for verifying authenticity is to use Paint or Microsoft Designer, which are applications that support content credentials. You can open any AI-generated image in these applications and click on the Content Credentials button in the toolbar. This will show you a dialog box with the same information as CredentialsFileView, such as the time and date of original creation and the cryptographic signature. You can also copy or save this information for future reference.
Source: Conversation with Bing, 9/26/2023 (1) CredentialsFileView: access decrypted Credentials files - Windows Report. https://windowsreport.com/credentialsfileview-windows/. (2) encryption - How can I read the contents of a crd file as plain text (i .... https://superuser.com/questions/1574865/how-can-i-read-the-contents-of-a-crd-file-as-plain-text-i-e-recover-my-passwo. (3) How to View Your Passwords in Credential Manager on Windows - wikiHow. https://www.wikihow.com/View-Your-Passwords-in-Credential-Manager-on-Windows. (4) 3 Ways to Decrypt Files and Folders on Windows 10 - MUO. https://www.makeuseof.com/windows-10-ways-to-decrypt-files/.

« Reply #256 on: September 26, 2023, 07:47 »
+2
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2023/sep/26/techscape-ai-images-elections-integrity-tiananmen-square

"A strange thing happened last week when you searched for tank man on Google.

Tap on image results and instead of the usual photos of Tiananmen Square in Beijing, and the iconic image of a brave protester staring down a convoy of tanks that was captured in 1989, the first result was the same historic moment but from a different point of view.

For a time last week, the first result on Google Images for tank man was instead an AI-generated image of the same protester, taking a selfie in front of the tank. The image was created by Midjourney, and was at least six months old. First reported by 404 Media, a new tech journalism startup set up by former Vice News staff, the emergence of the tank man selfie which Google subsequently removed from search results for tank man highlighted one of the main fears that Eddie Perez, Twitters former head of election integrity, highlighted to me in a recent podcast interview: its now possible, with the use of AI imagery, to create alternative history. "

« Reply #257 on: October 02, 2023, 10:43 »
+1
https://techcrunch.com/2023/09/30/how-much-can-artists-make-from-generative-ai-vendors-wont-say/

"So vendors including Adobe, Getty Images, Stability AI and YouTube have introduced or promised to introduce ways creators can share in their generative AI profits. The trouble is, the companies havent been clear about how much, exactly, creators can expect to earn. And for creators considering allowing a vendor to train a model on their works, it doesnt make the decision easy."

"Tough luck, creators
Tellingly, none of the generative AI vendors we spoke with would give a dollar amount the average creator can expect to see after forking over their creations for model training.

Some vendors blamed the absence of data on the newness of the tech and business model. Others said that the range would vary too widely to give a useful figure.

But for creators particularly those dependent on contract income to make ends meet those are arguments that are likely to ring hollow.

... At best, theyre offering hazy promises of future riches and hazy promises dont pay the rent."

« Reply #258 on: October 12, 2023, 10:12 »
+3
It's not really news that agencies are accepting content that violates their published rules, but given the recent WAG strike and ongoing SAG-AFTRA strike where AI use by companies is a key issue, I can see how this became a subject of discussion.

https://www.theverge.com/2023/10/9/23909529/disney-marvel-loki-generative-ai-poster-backlash-season-2

Some interesting points of view in the comments. For example how designers under pressure to keep their jobs feel

"It's an integrated tool in Photoshop at this point as well. If you're not using all the tools available to you, you're simply going to be seen as slow to employers. This pixel-measuring is just as ridiculous as when people tried to determine if filters were used in the 2000s. Having consumers breathing down creatives backs for the tools they pick is just an unnecessary pressure in an otherwise high-tension position to begin with."

"As a senior graphic designer who often does highly visible work for a myriad of household names, I can only shrug. Generative AI tools are an entrenched part of my workflow now, albeit at conceptual stage rather than finished artwork, or client internal communications use otherwise and the line has become blurred even further with the release of Photoshop's Generative Fill tools. The expected pace of design turnaround is faster than ever and I need to stay ahead of the hack account managers armed with Canva and MidJourney taking evening design courses, or its my job on the line."

"I mean, as a designer I understand very well that I have to keep up at this point. Pandora's box is open. It's out there. It won't go away. I'm also using it. But I do see the injustice in how big tech companies profit off of the labor of millions of artists and then selling the computer made remix back to me as a service. I feel if there's still a window where open outrage can sway some policies to better integrate artists and designers into the value chain it is probably now. If not now - it will be never."

Slightly different angle on the same topic - about how key Adobe's finance head is in making AI product decisions...

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/adobe-cfo-helping-steer-company-110806766.html

My experience is that the understanding finance people have of the guts of the business behind the numbers is very shallow
« Last Edit: October 12, 2023, 15:24 by Jo Ann Snover »

« Reply #259 on: October 13, 2023, 15:21 »
0

« Reply #260 on: October 21, 2023, 08:34 »
+2
Washington Post article (paywall) about major newspapers looking for payment for use of their content for AI tools/training

https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2023/10/20/artificial-intelligence-battle-online-data/

There is a mention of the estimates of Shutterstock's payout to contributors for data training on the collection:

"For example, the stock photo site Shutterstock has a partnership to provide training data for OpenAI. Late last year, the company also launched a Contributor Fund to compensate artists whose work has been used to train AI models. An analysis by stock photographer Robert Kneschke estimated that the fund paid out more than $4 million in May but the median payout was just $0.0069 per image. Shutterstock did not respond to request for comment."

The above contains a link to this PetaPixel story:
https://petapixel.com/2023/07/12/shutterstock-may-have-paid-out-over-4-million-from-its-ai-contributor-fund/

Some other interesting quotes (emphasis mine):

"Until recently, tech companies have been loath to pay for that data. At a listening session on generative AI hosted in April by the U.S. Copyright Office, Sy Damle, a lawyer representing the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, acknowledged that the only practical way for these tools to exist is if they can be trained on massive amounts of data without having to license that data. "

I'd suggest that it is not impractical, just more expensive. What theory of business mandates that your raw materials have to be free?

OpenAI continues to push the notion that their original scraping of data they didn't own or license was fair use:

"An OpenAI spokesperson confirmed that the company is in talks with the newspapers and that discussions were not focused on prior training data, which it argues was obtained legally. None of the companys practices have violated copyright law, the spokesperson said. Any deal would be for future access to content that is otherwise inaccessible or display uses that go beyond fair use. "

"Nearly $16 billion in venture capital poured into generative AI in the first three quarters of 2023, according to the analytics firm PitchBook a flood of cash that in part reflects how expensive the technology is to build. Every component is prohibitively pricey or hard to acquire, from hardware to computing power. Until now, the only free and easy part had been the data. "

« Reply #261 on: October 24, 2023, 01:33 »
+3

« Reply #262 on: October 24, 2023, 07:20 »
+1
Nightshade is a tool that performs a data poisoning attack against generative AI image models:
https://www.technologyreview.com/2023/10/23/1082189/data-poisoning-artists-fight-generative-ai/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_campaign=site_visitor.unpaid.engagement&utm_medium=tr_social

Very interesting read - from the people who worked on Glaze.

It's intriguing to think about how this tool could be deployed (when available) if contributors trusted stock agencies to be a representative of contributor interests.

Contributors would upload images as they do now. Agencies would generate thumbnails and preview images that had been "poisoned" by Nightshade. The contributor supply agreement would explicitly state that agencies can only train AI on the original images with compensation to the contributor.

By default, all licensed images for buyers would be unwatermarked but poisoned, allowing. use anywhere on the web, mobile apps, etc.

Licenses would permit a new type of extended license for large print uses (not any online use) where a buyer could license the unpoisoned JPEG in case reproduction at huge sizes or with certain printing techniques was compromised by the Nightshade alterations.

Except for that big "if"...

As it is, I'd expect agencies to state that they don't accept Nightshade-altered content and continue as before

https://venturebeat.com/ai/meet-nightshade-the-new-tool-allowing-artists-to-poison-ai-models-with-corrupted-training-data/
https://gizmodo.com/nightshade-poisons-ai-art-generators-dall-e-1850951218

Edited to add Ars Technica article on Nightshade

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2023/10/university-of-chicago-researchers-seek-to-poison-ai-art-generators-with-nightshade/

"The development of technologies like Nightshade could ignite an arms race between researchers intent to protect human creative works from AI absorption and those who seek to feed their data-hungry models. Larger companies with more resources may be able to eventually work around Nightshade with countermeasures, but smaller firms and open source projects with lower budgets might be disproportionately affected."
« Last Edit: October 26, 2023, 14:38 by Jo Ann Snover »

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #263 on: October 24, 2023, 14:07 »
0
Nightshade is interesting. Also reminder that AI can't be trained with AI or the process is poisoned or at the least, unreliable and diluted.

.0069 an image? I'd like to see how they arrived at that estimated number.

« Reply #264 on: October 24, 2023, 14:47 »
0

« Reply #265 on: October 29, 2023, 15:06 »
+1
https://petapixel.com/2023/10/29/ai-and-me-how-image-generation-is-changing-my-role-as-a-photographer/

One photographer's perspective on use of genAI images, including composites where the "set" is genAI and the studio is used to shoot the model who will be photoshopped into the set.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #266 on: October 30, 2023, 11:43 »
0
https://petapixel.com/2023/10/29/ai-and-me-how-image-generation-is-changing-my-role-as-a-photographer/

One photographer's perspective on use of genAI images, including composites where the "set" is genAI and the studio is used to shoot the model who will be photoshopped into the set.

Interesting use, nice colors and designs.

There are also some Escher stools in the bar photo, three legs, and even with an allowance for "art" some of the one leg versions look physically unstable. I think the one the girl is sitting on might be impossible to balance like that, or at least, very uncomfortable.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #267 on: November 02, 2023, 11:08 »
0
"A California federal judge on Monday dismissed all but one claim from a proposed class action by artists accusing companies behind artificial intelligence art software Stable Diffusion of using their works to train the program, saying the complaint "is defective in numerous respects" yet giving the plaintiffs a chance to amend their suit. "

https://www.reuters.com/legal/litigation/judge-pares-down-artists-ai-copyright-lawsuit-against-midjourney-stability-ai-2023-10-30/

Summary:
    Judge dismisses claims over AI output, publicity rights
    Key claim over use of artists' images in Stability AI training continues

Ruling:  https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/legaldocs/byprrngynpe/AI%20COPYRIGHT%20LAWSUIT%20mtdruling.pdf

« Reply #268 on: November 03, 2023, 08:49 »
0
You can still use Adobe firefly for free for a while.

But if you click on your account you can see your current credit allowance and usage.

https://discord.com/channels/1076190214369853510/1087560280982175784


Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #269 on: November 03, 2023, 10:42 »
0
You can still use Adobe firefly for free for a while.

But if you click on your account you can see your current credit allowance and usage.

https://discord.com/channels/1076190214369853510/1087560280982175784

No Text Channels error, unless I'm missing something?

« Reply #270 on: November 03, 2023, 15:01 »
+3
Artists may poison AI models before Copyright Office can issue guidance

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2023/11/artists-may-poison-ai-models-before-copyright-office-can-issue-guidance/

(emphasis mine)
" ...the Federal Trade Commission may have the power to intervene. Andrew Burt, a founder of an AI-focused law firm called BNH.ai, told TechCrunch that the FTC is "already pursuing" what the FTC calls algorithmic disgorgementwhich is where the FTC "forces tech firms to kill problematic algorithms along with any ill-gotten data that they used to train them." It seems possible then that, should artists suing AI makers win or should the Copyright Office provide such a recommendation, enforcers could one day order AI image makers to retrain models using only permitted, licensed data."

I'm not holding my breath, but it's an interesting idea

Separately from copyright law issues (which are a real tangle in an international arena), my thinking about training is that without creators' images generative AI image could not exist. They are wholly dependent on having stuff to ingest and it's stuff they didn't create or pay for. Some reasonable accommodation needs to be worked out (reasonable for both sides, not just whatever the large tech think they have the economic heft to grab).

« Reply #271 on: November 05, 2023, 15:24 »
+3
"The biggest companies in AI arent interested in paying to use copyrighted material as training data, and here are their reasons why."

https://www.theverge.com/2023/11/4/23946353/generative-ai-copyright-training-data-openai-microsoft-google-meta-stabilityai

"Meta: Copyright holders wouldnt get much money anyway...
Google: AI training is just like reading a book...
Microsoft: Changing copyright law could hurt small AI developers...
Anthropic: Current law is fine; dont change it...
Adobe: Its fair use, like when Accolade copied Segas code...
Anthropic: Copying is just an intermediate step ...
Andreessen Horowitz: Investors have spent billions and billions...
Hugging Face: Training on copyrighted material is fair use...
StabilityAI: Other countries call AI model training fair use...
Apple: Let us copyright our AI-made code"

Let me paraphrase: Because I have to spend huge sums on developing the code and any one of you wouldn't make much anyway, I get to take your stuff for free to train what I'm building. The last part from Apple would add: and all the profits from anything I make is mine to keep.

This is such self-serving B-S-

« Reply #272 on: November 05, 2023, 15:28 »
+1
https://petapixel.com/2023/11/05/genai-and-the-forced-evolution-of-photography-from-artifice-to-authenticity/

I like the notion that "Photography is more than just an imageits our connection to the real world, to one another, and to moments that inform our decisions."

His twitter feed references this article

https://futurism.com/adobe-caught-selling-ai-generated-images-israel-palestine-violence

I think the pseudo-editorial images have to be removed - like the 9/11 images that were allowed in and then removed a few months back.

The Futurism article doesn't mention Freepik, but their collection of over 30 million genAI images includes over 40k for a search for "gaza"

https://www.freepik.com/search?format=search&last_filter=query&last_value=gaza&query=gaza&type=ai

And even Shutterstock's sad collection of DALL-E creations includes a couple (along with their standard note "Important information - This content was generated by an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system. Shutterstock does not review AI-generated content for compliance with Shutterstocks content compliance standards. AI-generated"):

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-generated/gaza-city-palestine-2-children-playing-2384676855
https://www.shutterstock.com/image-generated/outdoor-photo-gaza-city-palestine-2-2384676351

Edited Nov 8 to add links to stories about the use of the fake Gaza images

https://www.crikey.com.au/2023/11/01/israel-gaza-adobe-artificial-intelligence-images-fake-news/
https://venturebeat.com/ai/adobe-responds-to-controversy-over-ai-generated-images-of-gaza-explosion/
https://www.vice.com/en/article/3akj3k/adobe-is-selling-fake-ai-generated-images-of-violence-in-gaza-and-israel
https://petapixel.com/2023/11/07/adobe-stock-is-selling-ai-generated-images-of-the-israel-hamas-conflict/

IMO the Adobe statement that they are working on the adoption of Content Credentials is an irrelevant distraction - I don't believe downloadable images had content credentials added, so how can any viewer of the pseudo-editorial stock image have any idea if it's authentic or not?

Adobe Stock is a marketplace that requires all generative AI content to be labeled as such when submitted for licensing. These specific images were labeled as generative AI when they were both submitted and made available for license in line with these requirements. We believe its important for customers to know what Adobe Stock images were created using generative AI tools.

Adobe is committed to fighting misinformation, and via the Content Authenticity Initiative, we are working with publishers, camera manufacturers and other stakeholders to advance the adoption of Content Credentials, including in our own products. Content Credentials allows people to see vital context about how a piece of digital content was captured, created or edited including whether AI tools were used in the creation or editing of the digital content.


Seems like a no-brainer (to me) for Adobe Stock to add content credentials to all genAI images they host. They already strip and alter metadata in what we upload, so it wouldn't be groundbreaking in any way. But I also cannot see anything good coming out of accepting pseudo-editorial images of an ongoing war.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2023, 13:15 by Jo Ann Snover »

« Reply #273 on: November 06, 2023, 09:54 »
0
https://petapixel.com/2023/11/05/genai-and-the-forced-evolution-of-photography-from-artifice-to-authenticity/

I like the notion that "Photography is more than just an imageits our connection to the real world, to one another, and to moments that inform our decisions."

His twitter feed references this article

https://futurism.com/adobe-caught-selling-ai-generated-images-israel-palestine-violence

I think the pseudo-editorial images have to be removed - like the 9/11 images that were allowed in and then removed a few months back.

The Futurism article doesn't mention Freepik, but their collection of over 30 million genAI images includes over 40k for a search for "gaza"

https://www.freepik.com/search?format=search&last_filter=query&last_value=gaza&query=gaza&type=ai

And even Shutterstock's sad collection of DALL-E creations includes a couple (along with their standard note "Important information - This content was generated by an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system. Shutterstock does not review AI-generated content for compliance with Shutterstocks content compliance standards. AI-generated"):

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-generated/gaza-city-palestine-2-children-playing-2384676855
https://www.shutterstock.com/image-generated/outdoor-photo-gaza-city-palestine-2-2384676351

Yes - a lot of AI images are coming out from Gaza to the social media.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #274 on: November 17, 2023, 12:11 »
+1
New:  file:///C:/Users/User%201/Downloads/COLC-2023-0006-9075_attachment_1.pdf  Intel answers the US Copyright office. It's long and a PDF.

19. Are any revisions to the Copyright Act necessary to clarify the human authorship
requirement or to provide additional standards to determine when content including AI-
generated material is subject to copyright protection?

In U.S. copyright law, it is sufficiently established that human authorship is required to receive
copyright protection. Federal courts have also declined to extend copyright protection to non-
human authors.12 No revisions to the Copyright Act are needed to clarify this requirement.
For instances whereby humans create content using AI-generated material, case law and
copyright registration guidance have outlined that the nature of human involvement in the
creation of the work will be a factor to determine copyright protection.13 This is a case-by-
case exercise. Current copyright registration guidance notes that a work containing AI-
generated material can contain sufficient human authorship to support a copyright claim.14 For
example, a human may select or arrange AI-generated material in a sufficiently creative way
that the resulting work as a whole constitutes an original work of authorship.15 While this
guidance currently holds, as the litigation landscape for generative AI evolves, it may be
necessary for additional standards to clarify authorship for AI-generated material.


Also in the news:
"U.S. Copyright Office general counsel Suzanne Wilson told attendees at a Los Angeles conference on the intersection of technology and entertainment Wednesday that generative artificial intelligence went from something "no one" is talking about to something everyone is, which is why her office expects to issue a major AI report soon."



 

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