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Author Topic: Alamy- Tips on getting Sales  (Read 28273 times)

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dbvirago

« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2014, 17:42 »
0
Congrats on the threshold, OldHand.


« Reply #26 on: August 10, 2014, 03:07 »
0
Thanks! - I never knew there was one till I apparently crossed it!

« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2014, 03:24 »
+5
Yeah, walk around with your camera and point it at stuff and keep clicking, upload 10s of thousands of whatever comes out and some of it will probably find buyers.

Actually it's called Street Photography and there's still demand for it.

I think there's a difference between interesting documentary "street photography", and "here's the fence down the road from me, and this is the building next to it, and here's another, and here's the sign on the building" that some Alamy contributors do.

« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2014, 08:29 »
+1
Started with Alamy in January 2014. Submitted hundreds of my best sellers, images that sell daily elsewhere. 0 sales. Stopped submitting because of their lazy review process where they check one image in a batch and refuse of deny the whole lot. So someone uploads 100 borderline garbage images, one barely passes, they all pass, search results get watered down. Another batch of 100 high quality, sale-able images, curator finds minor issue with one example, rejects them all and penalizes the contributor by delaying further reviews, and then they can't be bothered with specifying which image and why. Not a very well thought out system.

Then there's the lack of an upload option for video, and that new uploads seem to debut at the absolute bottom of search results without consideration of their quality or relevance, or a realistic chance of being seen let alone sold. Anyone with any success there had to be in years ago it seems. I definitely missed that boat. But since they offer a fair split and the faint hope of a healthy priced sale, I'll leave my content there. Not worth the time to continue uploading though, IMO.

« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2014, 09:16 »
0


I think there's a difference between interesting documentary "street photography", and "here's the fence down the road from me, and this is the building next to it, and here's another, and here's the sign on the building" that some Alamy contributors do.

not directed at Alamy, but all ms sites
... and we must not forget all those  nice little flowers by the roadside, artistically-placed garbage bins, insects, birds, laundry of many colours, etc. these r inspirational as the toilet-seats, meat-coat, bars on the wall,etc we have in our national art musuems...

lest we  forget, the ultimate street photographer ... papparazzi masterpieces of actresses bum-cracks, nipslips, hairpies coming out of cars,etc.. (but that's for another thread, of course).
« Last Edit: August 10, 2014, 09:28 by etudiante_rapide »

Ed

« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2014, 09:29 »
0


I think there's a difference between interesting documentary "street photography", and "here's the fence down the road from me, and this is the building next to it, and here's another, and here's the sign on the building" that some Alamy contributors do.

not directed at Alamy, but all ms sites
... and we must not forget all those " nice little flowers by the roadside, artistically-placed garbage bins, insects, birds, laundry of many colours, etc. these r inspirational as the toilet-seats, meat-coat, bars on the wall,etc we have in our national art musuems" ;D

Yes, this is the difference between microstock and traditional stock.....those images of insects and birds and nice little flowers are getting licensed by natural history textbook producers, and as in the case of an image licensed at AGE about a year ago, that "laundry of many colours" image licensed for about 5 figures (in this case, it was stacked bath towels of many colours).


« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2014, 11:39 »
+2
Stopped submitting because of their lazy review process where they check one image in a batch and refuse or deny the whole lot.
I actually like their review process, it treats photographers as professionals not children.  Upload good work and you will not have any issues.  I have not had a single image rejected in over a year.  Try that on SS, DT or any other micro worth being on. (Probably just jinxed myself :) )
Quote
Anyone with any success there had to be in years ago it seems. I definitely missed that boat.
Disagree with that, I started in 2012 and Alamy is my #2 earner.

What is important to remember is that Alamy is NOT microstock.  It takes a different mind set to be successful there.  Normal everyday MS images do sell occasionally but their core is textbook, reportage, newspapers and so on.  No one is going to buy an isolated tomato on Alamy when they can get it on MS for nothing.

And their reviewers look at things much differently than most MS sites.  One tiny dust spot and you are rejected on Alamy, probably never be noticed on an MS site.  But they will not reject you for borderline poor lighting, poor composition, or LCV.  They are looking for technically correct photographs, and relying on you, the photographer, to decide if the content is worth uploading.

They are not for everyone, I find I have to put my "Alamy hat" on when shooting for them as it is things I would not think of sending to MS.  I do send them as RF the best of my MS collection as well but use a different pseudo to keep that separate from my RM collection.

« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2014, 12:32 »
+1
"Upload good work and you will not have any issues.  I have not had a single image rejected in over a year."

Not by any means claiming my images are perfect, but they were certainly "good" enough to be accepted and make sales in multiple other places. While I do understand that they have a different kind of standard, and I admit I'm not quite clear on what that is exactly, I can't for the life of me figure out which image they deemed unworthy from a given group, or why. "Throwing out the baby with the bath water", as they say. Definitely doesn't make figuring out what they want any clearer either.

It can't be good for the collection as a whole and the search results to have a system that might allow what could be hundreds of poor quality images to "sneak" through in a batch because the reviewer just looked at one and found it "good enough". Quality control isn't just for children.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2014, 12:58 by Daryl Ray »

« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2014, 12:56 »
+4
"Upload good work and you will not have any issues.  I have not had a single image rejected in over a year."

Not by any means claiming my images are perfect, but they were certainly "good" enough to be accepted and makes sales in multiple other places. While I do understand that they have a different kind of standard, and I admit I'm not quite clear on what that is exactly, I can't for the life of me figure out which image they deemed unworthy from a given group, or why. "Throwing out the baby with the bath water", as they say.

It can't be good for the collection as a whole and the search results to have a system that might allow what could be hundreds of poor quality images to "sneak" through in a batch because the reviewer just looked at one and found it "good enough". Quality control isn't just for children.
Just click on the "failed batch" in red on the track submissions page and the rejection reason and rejected image is clearly marked.  And I certainly did not mean to imply your images were not good, only that what Alamy thinks is 'good' is NOT the same as what MS sites think is 'good'.  And they are not throwing anything away, you are free to resubmit all of the images in that batch except the rejected one without penalty or notice.  Unlike most MS sites.

You might have a point about the collection as a whole, but I think most people with poor quality images get weeded out or just frustrated and leave.  And those images quickly go to the bottom of the search and get lost anyway. 

As I said it is not for everyone, no matter how good their work is, because it takes a different mind set and standards.  It is hard to be good at both Alamy and MS because of that.  My MS collection is there but most sales come from the RM stuff that is not on MS.  You really do have to learn what they want, how it needs to be titled and keyworded and what quality standards they care about.  That is a lot of work and might not be worth the effort if you are used to shooting MS style stuff.

Different styles, different sites.  For example I have applied to Stocksy twice and been rejected twice.  Not because my work does not sell elsewhere but because my style is not what they want.  (Apparently, anyway or maybe I'm just not good enough:) )

« Reply #34 on: August 10, 2014, 13:07 »
0
"Just click on the "failed batch" in red on the track submissions page and the rejection reason and rejected image is clearly marked."

Clicked it, however all images in said batch just say "Failed QC" and the rejection reasons are all blank. Overall though, your points make perfect sense, thanks for the insight. Different strokes for different folks.

« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2014, 16:30 »
0
-1) What is important to remember is that Alamy is NOT microstock.  It takes a different mind set to be successful there.  Normal everyday MS images do sell occasionally but their core is textbook, reportage, newspapers and so on.  No one is going to buy an isolated tomato on Alamy when they can get it on MS for nothing.

-2) Different styles, different sites.  For example I have applied to Stocksy twice and been rejected twice.

so, is the money u make at Alamy good? or as good as u hoped to get from Stocksy?
do u consider Alamy in the same category as Stocksy?

« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2014, 18:41 »
+1
"Just click on the "failed batch" in red on the track submissions page and the rejection reason and rejected image is clearly marked."

Clicked it, however all images in said batch just say "Failed QC" and the rejection reasons are all blank. Overall though, your points make perfect sense, thanks for the insight. Different strokes for different folks.
Did you have more than one batch open at that time?  If so the failed image might be in another batch as all open batches get failed.  Other than that I've no idea, I have always gotten a reason even if I did not agree with it.

« Reply #37 on: August 10, 2014, 18:56 »
+1
-1) What is important to remember is that Alamy is NOT microstock.  It takes a different mind set to be successful there.  Normal everyday MS images do sell occasionally but their core is textbook, reportage, newspapers and so on.  No one is going to buy an isolated tomato on Alamy when they can get it on MS for nothing.

-2) Different styles, different sites.  For example I have applied to Stocksy twice and been rejected twice.

so, is the money u make at Alamy good? or as good as u hoped to get from Stocksy?
do u consider Alamy in the same category as Stocksy?

Alamy is my #2 earner behind SS.  But it is more erratic, some months very good money, some months nothing at all.  SS gives me a paycheck every month Alamy does not, but at the end of the year I feel I made money there.  it is really no bother to upload the RF stuff to Alamy, all the keywording and so on has already been done and since I only upload material that has been accepted widely elsewhere I do not worry about QC much.  The RM stuff is harder and I spend more time on it, but it is also fun to shoot things and not worry about how to frame every shot so there are no logos or people in them.

I think it is very hard to compare Alamy and Stocksy.  I really like the artists cooperative idea behind Stocksy and really wanted to belong.   I have a background in member owned cooperative management and thought it would be a good fit.  I had no expectations of what I would make.

Alamy is very old school and many contributors there started with film and slides so the attitude is different.  I like the agency, I think they try to treat contributors fairly and are very responsive to questions and issues.  The upload / keyword system is dated, even archaic but likely too hard to change now.  There is a plugin for Lightroom that makes things a lot easier though.  Sales are erratic and if you are used to logging in to SS several times a day to see your sales you will be sorely disappointed.

Stocksy, is (to me) mostly a concept or idea. Since I was not accepted I have no idea how they operate or if I would like being there.  I like the idea, I think it would be great to belong and help but as an outsider I cannot really give you any opinion on how they compare to Alamy.

« Reply #38 on: August 10, 2014, 19:08 »
0
Alamy is my #2 earner behind SS.  But it is more erratic, some months very good money, some months nothing at all.  SS gives me a paycheck every month Alamy does not, but at the end of the year I feel I made money there.  it is really no bother to upload the RF stuff to Alamy, all the keywording and so on has already been done and since I only upload material that has been accepted widely elsewhere I do not worry about QC much.  The RM stuff is harder and I spend more time on it, but it is also fun to shoot things and not worry about how to frame every shot so there are no logos or people in them.

I think it is very hard to compare Alamy and Stocksy.  I really like the artists cooperative idea behind Stocksy and really wanted to belong.   I have a background in member owned cooperative management and thought it would be a good fit.  I had no expectations of what I would make.

Alamy is very old school and many contributors there started with film and slides so the attitude is different.  I like the agency, I think they try to treat contributors fairly and are very responsive to questions and issues.  The upload / keyword system is dated, even archaic but likely too hard to change now.  There is a plugin for Lightroom that makes things a lot easier though.  Sales are erratic and if you are used to logging in to SS several times a day to see your sales you will be sorely disappointed.

Stocksy, is (to me) mostly a concept or idea. Since I was not accepted I have no idea how they operate or if I would like being there.  I like the idea, I think it would be great to belong and help but as an outsider I cannot really give you any opinion on how they compare to Alamy.

 much appreciated u took the trouble 2 respond so promptly. cheers

« Reply #39 on: August 11, 2014, 11:28 »
0
Just to say: You have a private message from me a couple of days ago and I hope will get response from Alamy:)

Thanks!
Deyan

« Reply #40 on: August 11, 2014, 11:40 »
+2
My Alamy earnings would probably be better if I didn't have some of the same RF photos on Alamy and the micros - nearly every time I have an image that's on both zoomed on Alamy, it sells on one of the micros, so I mostly stick with keeping the two portfolios separate these days.

I shoot a lot of travel, nature and editorial, so Alamy is a good outlet for my work and I've seen an uptick this year after a couple of years of dwindling sales. Since I'm licensing more images on my own these days, in order to protect the work I submit to publishers on my own, I've been uploading more as either RM or as RF without adding the same work to the micros.

My best sales on Alamy were $250+ and a few years back most were $100+, but this year my average sale there has been $48 (with $24 to me), which means I still get those $100+ sales but also some really small ones (ike Shady Sue, I'm in the newspaper scheme, meaning $3-16 sales). Sales are picking up and I expect 2014 to be much better than 2013.

Alamy was my best site last month, but that is still the exception rather than the rule. They've lowered their payout threshold from $250 to $75 and the minimum size photo from 48MB to 24MB since I started in 2008, so in that sense they are responding to the realities of the stock photo market (they also decreased royalties from 60% to 50%, still way above average). And recently they licensed a couple of my old 6MP images that I upsized to 48MB back in 2008, so old photos are selling there. Most of my travel and editorial stuff is illustrative editorial so I think they'll have a good shelf-life on Alamy. I'm averaging less than 2 but more than 1 sale per month with 600+ images.

Honestly, a lot of my travel stuff would sell equally well on both Alamy and micro (and many more times on micro) so I often have a hard time deciding where to place my work which makes it tough for me to give you advice. The best thing I can say is that the more work you have up there the better you'll probably do, and to point out the benefits of RM with this example: I have one photo that was purchased twice this month by a book publisher - since it was RM, they had to license it twice to use it twice in the same book. I have another that is RF and a magazine publisher with 20+ magazines licensed it once and can use it in all of their publications worldwide as many times as they want. The RM sales were both for more $ than the RF sale.

I also licensed that RM photo to a calendar company last year. Those 3 sales have netted me almost half as much as my best-seller ($-wise) on SS which has been licensed 261 times, including 10 ELs. Both images are comparable in many ways, of popular travel locations in New England, so I think the comparison is illustrative. Hard to say if I'd have earned twice as much on SS if I'd uploaded that same image there as RF instead, but it would require hundreds of sales, not just 3.

« Reply #41 on: August 11, 2014, 12:17 »
+1
My Alamy earnings would probably be better if I didn't have some of the same RF photos on Alamy and the micros -
- I've been uploading more as either RM or as RF without adding the same work to the micros.

-  payout threshold from $250 to $75
- minimum size photo from 48MB to 24MB
- Most of my travel and editorial stuff is illustrative editorial so I think they'll have a good shelf-life on Alamy. I'm averaging less than 2 but more than 1 sale per month with 600+ images.

Honestly, a lot of my travel stuff would sell equally well on both Alamy and The RM sales were both for more $ than the RF sale.

I also licensed that RM photo to a calendar company last year. Those 3 sales have netted me almost half as much as my best-seller ($-wise) on SS which has been licensed 261 times, including 10 ELs. Both images are comparable in many ways, of popular travel locations in New England, so I think the comparison is illustrative. Hard to say if I'd have earned twice as much on SS if I'd uploaded that same image there as RF instead, but it would require hundreds of sales, not just 3.


many changes happened since i was last there, for sure.
highlit edited your points taken to heart.

i too was with Alamy from their maiden voyage, but have long neglected it for micro
but these days micro has over-saturated itself , and i consider going back to RM ,
and ur port is pretty much in line with my new project of non-micro collections (travels, calendar ,
editorials).

it's good too the reduction to 24MB as min req. but i still think there can be a need
for the old  48MB. maybe Alamy might give an option to the higher-paying RM
to have this available upon request . i m sure the clients would prefer a 48mb
than 24mb as they will give better hard copy, cleaner, etc

for my own gallery quality hard copies i still prefer as high original px as they do print cleaner
posters,etc
maybe, as  here mentioned, i should be looking to Alamy once again.
the RM editorials are what originally attracted me to Alamy.

thx

ShadySue

« Reply #42 on: August 11, 2014, 15:20 »
+1
We are very different to microstock so a different strategy is needed.
It would be very interesting if you would spell out exactly how you feel you are different - given that so many of my images sell for less from Alamy than (other) images I have on iS sell for (totally different images and RM vs RF), and what our 'different strategy' should be.

One of the most frustrating things about Alamy IMO is that no matter how rare the subject matter of a file is, it can still be sold for peanuts because of a client's negotiated discount. I'm intrigued about what strategy I can adopt to prevent that.

ShadySue

« Reply #43 on: August 11, 2014, 16:56 »
+2
Despite my best year at Alamy being 2013, my average sale gross was $42.63.
This year, not only have sales slumped, but my average  in 2014 has been $36.24 gross.

Would also therefore be interested to know what kinds of images sell for the $100 gross you quoted - presumably high production value studio shots with models - except that is bread and butter for micro, and you're different.
Does RF sell better/for more than RM on Alamy?

« Reply #44 on: August 12, 2014, 03:10 »
0
Just to say: You have a private message from me a couple of days ago and I hope will get response from Alamy:)

Thanks!
Deyan

It will - but we're very busy at the moment so it might not be for a couple more days.

Despite my best year at Alamy being 2013, my average sale gross was $42.63.
This year, not only have sales slumped, but my average  in 2014 has been $36.24 gross.

Would also therefore be interested to know what kinds of images sell for the $100 gross you quoted - presumably high production value studio shots with models - except that is bread and butter for micro, and you're different.
Does RF sell better/for more than RM on Alamy?

We're not ignoring this, just have a lot on at present and will respond shortly.

Ed

« Reply #45 on: August 12, 2014, 07:50 »
+1
Despite my best year at Alamy being 2013, my average sale gross was $42.63.
This year, not only have sales slumped, but my average  in 2014 has been $36.24 gross.

Would also therefore be interested to know what kinds of images sell for the $100 gross you quoted - presumably high production value studio shots with models - except that is bread and butter for micro, and you're different.
Does RF sell better/for more than RM on Alamy?

Sue, I have many shots of models.  I have licensed exactly two images of the models I've shot in my portfolio at Alamy.

I uploaded a few more model shots from a recent session and they were zoomed immediately so I am hoping that this is changing.

As far as images $100 gross or more this year - they do exist.  My average is 84.49 (gross) and I am also in the newspaper scheme.  I won't show the images (I don't need everyone and their brother copying my images even if the majority are non-repeatable newsworthy images) but here is what I have seen personally reported to me as being licensed in 2014 that were $100 gross or over.

Country: Spain
Usage: Advertising/Promotion
Media: Point of purchase display
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Print run: up to 25
Image Size: up to 1/2 area
Start: 03 December 2013
End: 03 June 2014
$ 333.03

Country: World English Language
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: up to 3 million
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 21 April 2014
End: 21 April 2024
All terms and rights granted as per the Preferred Vendor Agreement dated 1st June 2010 prevail. World English Language rights plus two additional languages, flat rate per image, rights granted for the life of the edition.
$ 150.00

Country: World English Language
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: up to 5,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/4 page
Start: 23 April 2014
End: 23 April 2019
$ 115.00

Country: World English Language
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: up to 25,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 06 January 2015
End: 06 January 2020
Print run: 20,000 Duration :7 Years
$ 100.00

Note that three of the four $100 gross or above are editorial licenses.  If you place editorial images on the micros, they may get licensed once or twice or 10 times for less than $1 each time....this is why I always say the micros are not the place for editorial images.  Red Carpet and celebrities may be different, but not everyday editorial and newsworthy images.

ShadySue

« Reply #46 on: August 12, 2014, 08:22 »
0
Interesting.
Here are my non-'UK newspaper scheme sales' for this year (note how few, I'm running under 50% of last year's sales, and c30% of last year's $$) - sales figures below are gross, mostly 50% to me; a few distributor, 40% to me:

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 01 January 2014
End: 01 January 2024
$113.14

Country: Worldwide
Usage: iQ sale: Magazine, editorial print and digital use, up to DPS, cover and/or inside, repeat use for a single title
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 04 February 2014
End: 04 February 2016
$75

Country: United States
Usage: iQ sale: Magazine, Any editorial digital use. cover or inside.One time use only.
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 19 February 2014
End: 19 February 2016
$45

Country: Italy
Usage: Editorial
Media: Magazine - Print only
Print run: up to 50,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/8 page
Start: 26 February 2014
End: 26 March 2014
$32.92

Country: United Kingdom
Usage: Editorial
Media: Magazine - Print only
Print run: up to 150,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: Spot size
Start: 22 March 2014
End: 22 June 2014
In-Context online usage included. Print run: 120,000. UK - Includes up to 5% overseas distribution
$40.85

Country: World English Language
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: up to 50,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 11 April 2014
End: 11 April 2024
$73.22

Country: Russian Federation
Usage: Editorial
Media: Magazine - Print only
Print run: up to 10,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/2 page
Start: 01 April 2014
End: 01 May 2014
$44.79

Country: Worldwide
Usage: iQ sale: Magazine, editorial print and digital use, inside, repeat use within a single issue
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 03 June 2014
End: 03 June 2016
$57.33

Country: Worldwide
Usage: iQ sale: Retail book. Editorial print + digital use. Up to DPS.inside.One time use only
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 10 June 2014
End: 10 June 2039
$65.52

Country: Australia, New Zealand and Oceania
Usage: iQ sale: Magazine, editorial print and digital use, cover and/or inside, one time use only
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 10 June 2014
End: 10 June 2016
$69.81

Country: Germany
Usage: Editorial
Media: Retail book - print only
Print run: up to 5,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/8 page
Start: 01 May 2014
End: 01 May 2015
$46.74

Country: Germany
Usage: Editorial
Media: Retail book - print only
Print run: up to 5,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/8 page
Start: 01 May 2014
End: 01 May 2015
$34.23

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Editorial website
Placement: Single Placement
Image Size: up to full area
Start: 01 July 2014
End: 01 July 2017
Editorial web use, multiple placement; rights granted in line with customer agreement which may vary from invoice details above
$10.00

So you can see, only one sale over $100 gross, and my UK newspaper scheme sales take the average way down from the above.

AIUI, and Alamy can correct me if I'm wrong, the amount paid for a photo is dependent only on the discount the buyer has negotiated, and nothing to do with the quality or rarity of the image itself.
Also, Alamy have said that buyers in the UK newspaper scheme don't see images which aren't opted into the scheme (though presumably they could choose to look through the rest of the collection if the image was rare enough and they were willing to pay full a higher price), and you can't, AFAIK, opt rare images 'out'.

Note also the bizarre, internally contradictory terms bolded in the last sale noted.

It was noted above that the BBC website uses Alamy pics. I see them very seldom, and suspect they're a source of last resort. What I see mostly there is Getty for celebs and Thinkstock for ordinary stock photos. I had a sole Alamy photo of a certain UK location, and incredibly a 'national newsworthy' incident took place there a couple of months after I took it. I had exactly the spot where the incident happened - and the Beeb chose to use a 'near enough' fuzzy/distorted pic cropped from Google Earth.

As far as micros go, up until whatever disaster iStock visited on themselves in late Sept 2012, my editorial sales there were almost on a par with Alamy, and obviously for a lot more than $1 (and more than Alamy's UK Newspaper Scheme). Now my iS editorial and 'creative' sales are equally down the swannee. I was never on the others, but can't imagine making the effort for 25c at some other places.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 15:41 by ShadySue »

« Reply #47 on: August 12, 2014, 11:08 »
0
I think one's average gross depends on a combination of image quality & scarcity, price negotiation, and luck.   For any one sale, one of those factors can strongly determine price, but over time all factors matter.

I checked out my sales for past year, and average gross is within a few dollars of Ed's, so close to A's $100 gross average comment. I don't have any images on micros. Licenses were almost all editorial, and involved varied city sights, politicians, cars, animals, public celebrations and civic engagement...
- Ann
« Last Edit: August 12, 2014, 12:45 by ann »

« Reply #48 on: August 12, 2014, 17:01 »
0
my overall gross is $53.4 per sale. for 2014 it is 69.3 (but a lot less sales so far compared to 2012) -  50% of 2013 with a bit past 50% of the year.

They were my #2 agency 2012 and 2013. Sales seem pretty random there though. I didn't have much there until they lowered the size requirement.

ShadySue

« Reply #49 on: August 13, 2014, 06:06 »
0
Well, whoopee, another dropped in from yesterday:
Country: Worldwide
Usage: iQ sale: Magazine, editorial print and digital use, repeat use within a single issue. Discounted re-use.
Industry sector: Media, design & publishing
Start: 12 August 2014
End: 12 August 2019
$10.75 (gross)
I would also, as well as the questions I asked above, like Alamy to confirm whether there's anything we can do (in terms of the photos we submit) to get larger value sales (the kind which make the 'average' $100 gross, as this one has just pulled my average even further down), or is it just buyer discount. That's a lot of usages for the price.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 06:49 by ShadySue »


 

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