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Author Topic: Best point and shoot for stock and general photography  (Read 7079 times)

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« on: February 07, 2008, 09:10 »
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When it just doesn't make sens to bring along a DSLR but you still want a camera that could take decent photos... which one would you pick.

I think my (so far) top pick would be
Canon Powershot G9 but I am interested in others thoughts.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2008, 09:17 by leaf »


« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2008, 10:31 »
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thats great P&S camera! I agree with your choice!

« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2008, 10:32 »
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leaf:

Just in case you don't know - I had posted the following similar thread a while back and had received quite a few replies:

http://www.microstockgroup.com/index.php?topic=1801.msg24483

« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2008, 11:11 »
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ah yes thanks.  I even posted in that thread  :-\

« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2008, 12:11 »
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Now y'all gonna think me completely mad ...

For a small pocketable camera I carry a film one - an old Olympus XA.

I can scan the resulting images and get 19MP.

« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2008, 12:26 »
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Now y'all gonna think me completely mad ...

For a small pocketable camera I carry a film one - an old Olympus XA.

I can scan the resulting images and get 19MP.

Lol, we're two at least. I'm waiting for an Agfa Isolette II 6x6 I just bought out of eBay for the same reason.

PaulieWalnuts

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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2008, 13:01 »
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The new Sigma DP1. The sensor is similar to the one in their SD14 DSLR with 14 "effective" megapixels.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0801/08013108sigmadp1.asp

« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2008, 14:50 »
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leaf:

Just in case you don't know - I had posted the following similar thread a while back and had received quite a few replies:

http://www.microstockgroup.com/index.php?topic=1801.msg24483


which camera did you end up buying by the way?

« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2008, 14:55 »
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Now y'all gonna think me completely mad ...

For a small pocketable camera I carry a film one - an old Olympus XA.

I can scan the resulting images and get 19MP.

I can do that but I also get too much grain.  How do you produce 19mp files that are acceptable to the micros?  I can do it if I spend an hour on each photo but that doesn't seem worth it.

« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2008, 14:58 »
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leaf:

Just in case you don't know - I had posted the following similar thread a while back and had received quite a few replies:

http://www.microstockgroup.com/index.php?topic=1801.msg24483


which camera did you end up buying by the way?


I haven't purchased anything yet.  I'm still looking.

I looked at the G9 (along with a dozen or so other cameras), but after looking at sample photos I found that they all had too much noise.  This normally wouldn't be a problem for most applications, but as you are aware the micros are noise-*.

« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2008, 15:21 »
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leaf:

Just in case you don't know - I had posted the following similar thread a while back and had received quite a few replies:

http://www.microstockgroup.com/index.php?topic=1801.msg24483


which camera did you end up buying by the way?


I haven't purchased anything yet.  I'm still looking.

I looked at the G9 (along with a dozen or so other cameras), but after looking at sample photos I found that they all had too much noise.  This normally wouldn't be a problem for most applications, but as you are aware the micros are noise-*.


I bought the G9.  When I downsize the images they are OK for the micros.  I only use 80asa but the minimum aperture is F8 and it has IS, so no problem using it in good light.   Some people have uploaded full size to istock and have been accepted but I haven't tried that yet.  This one is on most of the sites and you can zoom in here to see it full size.
http://mostphotos.com/view.php?imgid=75153&offset=414&thumbnailsize=large&displayinformation=standard&reflections=on&imagetype=all&orderby=idx&periodlimit=-1&category=all&usage=all&shape=all&querytype=gallery&memberid=2390

« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2008, 15:24 »
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that looks like a nice exposure.  no visible purple fringing or blurry edges.

« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2008, 15:26 »
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Now y'all gonna think me completely mad ...

For a small pocketable camera I carry a film one - an old Olympus XA.

I can scan the resulting images and get 19MP.

I can do that but I also get too much grain.  How do you produce 19mp files that are acceptable to the micros?  I can do it if I spend an hour on each photo but that doesn't seem worth it.

That's why I choosed 6x6 and 6x9. I'm curious how a 48 mb scan resized to 8-10 could be worse than a jpg coming out from a digital P&S.

« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2008, 15:26 »
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I agree that the G9 (and many other cameras) will do fine in good lighting and shooting at a low ISO.  The problem is at higher ISOs.

I'm obviously also spoiled by larger sensors  :P

« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2008, 15:36 »
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I ran into a guy yesterday who was pretty happy with his G9 - he even had an underwater housing for it!

« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2008, 20:15 »
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This is the one you want:



It's Fuji's new, collapsible 6x7 prototype. Very nice if you have big pockets  ;D

Seriously though: the G9 is obviously good, the Nikon P5100 likewise although slower (I believe they have the same Sony sensor) but more pocketable and with possibly even better manual control.

My favourite has always been the Canon 650IS and it's predecessors. It's a bit bulky, but has an articulated LCD which makes it easier to take photos from awkward positions as well as protecting the screen by turning it inwards. It uses AAs, which can sometimes be a big help.

Sensor and lens of the 650 is the same as on the G9, but there's no RAW and manual control is mostly menu driven.

If you have a lot of money and even more patience, take a look at the Sigma DP1. I'm  sure it will be a great camera.... some time   ::)

graficallyminded

« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2008, 11:11 »
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Canon a series is awesome - I like the a570IS.  I personally own an a610 - its only 5 megapixels, but I've sold hundreds of photos shot with it.  The color is great and the lens is sharp - very low noise.  It's obsolete now, but there are a lot of newer models with the swivel LCD screen.

« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2008, 11:20 »
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What about the Canon Powershot S70?  Would it be a reasonable good camera for stock?

« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2008, 08:23 »
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Go on buy a lecia M8  ;D

« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2008, 15:44 »
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Most of my microstock images were done with a Canon Powershot A620.  And the swiveled LCD panel is a nice twist in many conditions (I've shot a sunset behind me in Africa :D ).

Regards,
Adelaide


 

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