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Author Topic: Good "bridge" camera?  (Read 7870 times)

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« on: November 27, 2010, 01:25 »
0
I am tired of lugging around heavy stuff. I want something portable and light just to have with me all the time, and I want it to have good image quality.
I looked at Leica V-Lux 2 and it seemed promising, but I couldn't find any decent review of it. I found some images taken with "pre-production" camera and kinda looks like crap at full resolution. I mean, I shoot with Nikon D3X usually so it's hard to compare to, but still - is there anything decent in the "bridge" cameras categories? Decent meaning good enough quality to sell.
Would appreciate any advice or links or pointers to reviews.
Thanks in advance,
Elena.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 18:42 by Elenathewise »


« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2010, 04:03 »
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I tried a bridge camera, the Fujifilm FinePix S100fs.  Not bad past 50mm but the wide angle end is horrible.  I can get downsized 5 or 6mp on the micros but it can take a bit of work.  I would go for a micro 4/3, panasonic or olympus.  The Samsung NX5 also looks good.

microstockphoto.co.uk

« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2010, 04:33 »
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Agree with sharpshot. The Olympus E-series (E510, E620...) are the lightest dSLR and are pretty good with a 14-55 mm lens. No need to carry other lenses usually.

However, if someone knows about an even smaller real "bridge" camera, it could be useful in some cases: such as at live concerts where they don't usually allow reflex cameras. Provide there's not too much noise at high ISO.

« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2010, 09:32 »
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Agree with sharpshot. The Olympus E-series (E510, E620...) are the lightest dSLR and are pretty good with a 14-55 mm lens. No need to carry other lenses usually.

However, if someone knows about an even smaller real "bridge" camera, it could be useful in some cases: such as at live concerts where they don't usually allow reflex cameras. Provide there's not too much noise at high ISO.


I think sharpshot means the pen series or Panasonic G-series. I also agree - best option at the moment would be the Panasonic GH2 + 14-140 lens. Any of the cameras in the m4/3 range is good enough to produce images that will be accepted at XL size on istock.

I have some comparison between the 5DII and GF1 on my website:

http://www.veoelmundo.com/canon-5d-mk-ii-vs-panasonic-gf1-baby-vs-goliath-pt-3-wat-pho
http://www.veoelmundo.com/canon-5d-mk-ii-vs-panasonic-gf1-raw-pt-2-blue-sky-sunshine
http://www.veoelmundo.com/photography-blog/night-shootout-panasonic-gf1-vs-canon-5d-mk-ii

Its not a scientific comparison, but maybe more useful in some respects than something that is.

Not sure that its an ideal solution for a concert situation though, unless you're pretty close and can get your hands on something like the Voigtlander 25mm f0.95

Edit: Also might be worth looking at thisL http://www.peterlueck.com/fotografie/voigtlander-nokton-250-95-%C2%B7-die-jackentaschenlampe/ in German, but I'm sure google can help!
« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 09:48 by holgs »

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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2010, 10:28 »
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I think sharpshot means the pen series or Panasonic G-series. I also agree - best option at the moment would be the Panasonic GH2 + 14-140 lens. Any of the cameras in the m4/3 range is good enough to produce images that will be accepted at XL size on istock.

I have some comparison between the 5DII and GF1 on my website

I guess you're right sharpshot meant the pen series. Good cameras indeed.

PS: thanks for the comparisons and suggestions.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 10:34 by microstockphoto.co.uk »

« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2010, 12:55 »
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Agree with sharpshot. The Olympus E-series (E510, E620...) are the lightest dSLR and are pretty good with a 14-55 mm lens. No need to carry other lenses usually.

However, if someone knows about an even smaller real "bridge" camera, it could be useful in some cases: such as at live concerts where they don't usually allow reflex cameras. Provide there's not too much noise at high ISO.


I think sharpshot means the pen series or Panasonic G-series. I also agree - best option at the moment would be the Panasonic GH2 + 14-140 lens. Any of the cameras in the m4/3 range is good enough to produce images that will be accepted at XL size on istock.

I have some comparison between the 5DII and GF1 on my website:

http://www.veoelmundo.com/canon-5d-mk-ii-vs-panasonic-gf1-baby-vs-goliath-pt-3-wat-pho
http://www.veoelmundo.com/canon-5d-mk-ii-vs-panasonic-gf1-raw-pt-2-blue-sky-sunshine
http://www.veoelmundo.com/photography-blog/night-shootout-panasonic-gf1-vs-canon-5d-mk-ii

Its not a scientific comparison, but maybe more useful in some respects than something that is.

Not sure that its an ideal solution for a concert situation though, unless you're pretty close and can get your hands on something like the Voigtlander 25mm f0.95

Edit: Also might be worth looking at thisL http://www.peterlueck.com/fotografie/voigtlander-nokton-250-95-%C2%B7-die-jackentaschenlampe/ in German, but I'm sure google can help!


Very nice comparison, that's what I wanted to see - side-to-side 100% view examples. Looks like GF1 does a pretty good job. Thanks!

« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2010, 14:23 »
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What about SONY A55VL - anyone had experience with that one?

lisafx

« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2010, 14:44 »
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I have been reading reviews of the Sony NEX-5.  That one looks promising.  Anyone tried it?

« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2010, 23:11 »
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I've only tried the Sony cameras in-store. The NEX seems nicely built but it just handles too much like a moblie phone strapped to a big lens. If they bring out some more lenses like the 16mm it may be a bit better. The target market seems too much like the cool kids in Japan than photography enthusiasts. That said, the image quality is going to be good enough for microstock if you know what you're doing.

The A55 seems to be getting a good response from users, but there's not really that much difference size-wise when compared to a small DSLR, particularly seeing as there aren't any lenses that are any more compact that traditional DSLR lenses. I can't see any reason why you'd get this over a D3100 if you already have Nikon lenses - its only about 50g lighter.

Its in the video specifications and capabilities that the Panasonic cameras, particularly the GH2 are really nice. I'll probably get one for the video features when it becomes more widely available.

« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2010, 12:36 »
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I have been reading reviews of the Sony NEX-5.  That one looks promising.  Anyone tried it?

I just read a review on NEX-5 in D-SLR camera guide and it says this:
"If you approach this as a D-SLR owner looking for a top-quality pocket camera, the NEX is a disappointment. It's just too difficult to make manual adjustments, so as a result, the NEX-5 rather falls between two stools" . They also say the quality is "no match for rival D-SLRs".

I haven't tried it myself though.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 13:09 by Elenathewise »

PaulieWalnuts

  • On the Wrong Side of the Business
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2010, 13:04 »
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I have a GF1 along with a 5DMII.

The GF1 will produce acceptable quality for stock and the controls are very DSLR-like.

The only downside is its not quite what I would call pocketable. It's more like a rangefinder. If you want a pocket camera you may want to look at a Panasonic LX5 or Canon S95.

« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2010, 14:01 »
0

The A55 seems to be getting a good response from users, but there's not really that much difference size-wise when compared to a small DSLR, particularly seeing as there aren't any lenses that are any more compact that traditional DSLR lenses. I can't see any reason why you'd get this over a D3100 if you already have Nikon lenses - its only about 50g lighter.

Its in the video specifications and capabilities that the Panasonic cameras, particularly the GH2 are really nice. I'll probably get one for the video features when it becomes more widely available.

Well see with A55 you get this little cool flip LCD screen. I the (very) old days I used to own Canon Powershot G2 which also had that feature and I found it very useful. You can take ground level photos without actually having to lie down on your belly:) Since I haven't held the A55 myself I am not sure if it flips to the side like Powershot one was. I guess it's time go to a camera store.

About another Nikon body - I already have a D300 body that's lying around without much use, maybe I should just put a fast 50 mm lens for it and call it my "super-light" camera...;-)

« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2010, 15:16 »
0

The A55 seems to be getting a good response from users, but there's not really that much difference size-wise when compared to a small DSLR, particularly seeing as there aren't any lenses that are any more compact that traditional DSLR lenses. I can't see any reason why you'd get this over a D3100 if you already have Nikon lenses - its only about 50g lighter.

Its in the video specifications and capabilities that the Panasonic cameras, particularly the GH2 are really nice. I'll probably get one for the video features when it becomes more widely available.


Well see with A55 you get this little cool flip LCD screen. I the (very) old days I used to own Canon Powershot G2 which also had that feature and I found it very useful. You can take ground level photos without actually having to lie down on your belly:) Since I haven't held the A55 myself I am not sure if it flips to the side like Powershot one was. I guess it's time go to a camera store.

About another Nikon body - I already have a D300 body that's lying around without much use, maybe I should just put a fast 50 mm lens for it and call it my "super-light" camera...;-)


There's a lot to be said for the DSLR + 50mm as a super-light camera option.

The flip screen on the A55 is attached to the bottom - the GH2 has its flip-screen on the side...

Also just came across this review which is of more interest for video. Not really that good reading for Canon fans: http://www.eoshd.com/content/460-Canon-60D-versus-Panasonic-GH2-Full-Review-Part-1

« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2010, 15:34 »
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Well now I am seeing double from looking at all the sample photos at 100% resolution for 2 days from different lightweight cameras. The only one I liked quality-wise was Leica M9 which costs like a small car, has only manual focus, no zoom and very limited number of lenses. And it's not even that small. The quality is quite nice though, no question there. So I guess it's either M9 or wait till technology makes another leap... ("Come on technology... you can do it... leap already..."   ok now I really do need a break:))

« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2010, 18:20 »
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..Also just came across this review which is of more interest for video. Not really that good reading for Canon fans: http://www.eoshd.com/content/460-Canon-60D-versus-Panasonic-GH2-Full-Review-Part-1

I'm pleased with the video quality from my Canon 550D, it's great for stock footage and has had good reviews on some of the sites that are really in to video.  The GH2 does look good though and I am now seriously tempted by that.  Now I do timelapse, shutters might not last long.  A great excuse to get another camera :)

« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2010, 22:00 »
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Well now I am seeing double from looking at all the sample photos at 100% resolution for 2 days from different lightweight cameras. The only one I liked quality-wise was Leica M9 which costs like a small car, has only manual focus, no zoom and very limited number of lenses. And it's not even that small. The quality is quite nice though, no question there. So I guess it's either M9 or wait till technology makes another leap... ("Come on technology... you can do it... leap already..."   ok now I really do need a break:))

If at all possible - try to borrow a camera that you're interested in, shoot with it for a day and process the images yourself - that's really the only way you'll know if it meets your needs.

What you see on the web is really a reflection of the users shoot settings and the post-processing used than anything. 100% enlargements that have gone through web-processing and hosting aren't the same as what you'd get out of a clean workflow. I'm sure if you look for D3X samples you'll find some that are nice, and some that would make you think you're looking at the output from a cheap P&S. The same applies more to the smaller cameras because that there are far more people who can afford one than is the case with a Leica or a D3X. 

« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2010, 02:27 »
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I bought the A55 and now use it over my A700.  The A55 with my Zeiss 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 combo weighs under 2 lbs and you get amazing 16MP shots.

LSD72

  • My Bologna has a first name...
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2010, 07:29 »
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I am looking at getting the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ35 for a walk around Bridge Cam.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/639338-REG/Panasonic_DMC_FZ35K.html

lisafx

« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2010, 13:06 »
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Thanks Holgs, and Elena, for the info on the Sony NEX.   Doesn't sound like it's the one for me.  Maybe if they come out with some smaller lenses. 

Guess I will stick with my tiny S90 for now.  The pictures are absolutely useless for stock, but at least it's small and can fit in my purse. 


 

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