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Author Topic: Sensor Cleaning with Copperhill  (Read 6831 times)

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« on: October 23, 2006, 08:28 »
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I finally have a 'more or less' clean sensor.  There was so much grunge and grime, i think it will take a while before it is spotless, but there is none the less probably 10,000 less dirt blobs on there now, than there use to be.

:) :) :)

Here are two pics of before and after.. this is a 100% cropped view of the left hand side


« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2006, 08:34 »
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Wow, I thought my sensor was dirty :)

dbvirago

« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2006, 08:53 »
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Did you let your dog drag it up the beach with the lens off?  ;D

Seriously, that's a great endorsement for the product. I'm still using a blower and photoshop, but once I found out how to minimize getting the sensor dirty, I don't have near the problems I did when I first started.

« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2006, 09:01 »
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well it DID take 25 swipes of the cleaner.

I bought the camera used.... i don't think the guy before me cleaned it too often.  Surprising as he was a professional photographer and said he used the camera the same day i bought it.

Perhaps he takes photos at 2.8 all the time.

Yeah I think it is a pretty good cleaning solution.  If i had used the packaged and prepared sensor swabs from photosol, it would have cost me quite a few $$.

I was so impressed with the results that I decided to offer the products in a little web shop on my proffesional website.  The best place to get the stuff is from the copper hill site, but if you live in norway, like I do, not everything is available internationally from the copperhill site.  Plus it takes a little longer for shipping... so now it is available in norway too :)

dbvirago

« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2006, 12:29 »
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So what did you use for swabs?

« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2006, 13:18 »
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pec pads with the copperhil sensor swipe (which is basically a spatula, which you attach the pec pad to)

« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2006, 00:00 »
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Everyone is always worried about using them, but I have no problem. As long as you follow the directions it is completely safe. All the "horror" stories are from people that squirted a lot of the ethenol onto the swabs and soaked the components. (directions say 2-3 drops).

« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2006, 00:57 »
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if you use photosol sensorswabs you have to drip them with exclipse cleaner as well.

and yes, two small drops is ample.

« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2006, 02:22 »
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Perhaps he takes photos at 2.8 all the time.

That's not as silly as it sounds though, I normally shoot at F/2.8-F/4 and ignore sensor dust untill I've got a studio session booked them whip out the sensorswabs and eclipse...  In bright sunlight I might get as small as F/5.6.

For studio portraits I'm workin at F8-11 which shows up my lack of general camera care like crazy. :-).

« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2006, 07:28 »
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well i agree it isn't uncommon to almost always shoot unter f/8 or f/5.6.  I shoot a lot of interior architecture at f/11 and the first pictures i did looked the the walls had freckles.  ugggh

« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2006, 12:45 »
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Thanks for the info on Copperhill, I also went on the Eclipse fluid site and they said that Pec Pads are NOT reccomended for sensor cleaning. They say to use Sensor Swabs.
Here is the linkhttp://www.photosol.com/padproduct.htm

Is the general consensus that pec pads are ok ???

Greg Boiarsky

« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2006, 13:26 »
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Pec Pads are just fine, and a whole lot cheaper than Sensor Swabs.

Thanks for the info on Copperhill, I also went on the Eclipse fluid site and they said that Pec Pads are NOT reccomended for sensor cleaning. They say to use Sensor Swabs.
Here is the linkhttp://www.photosol.com/padproduct.htm

Is the general consensus that pec pads are ok ???

« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2006, 13:52 »
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Pec Pads work very well and have been proven by thousands of people.  That absolute worst that could happen is it could leave some fibers behind.  I have never heard of a single complaint of that happening but that is the reason Sensor Swab is claiming they are better.  Pec Pads won't come close to actually damaging anything.

Mark

« Reply #13 on: October 25, 2006, 14:11 »
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THe other advantage of Sensor swabs are they are made in a sealed chamber whereas with pecpads, if you put your finger on the bit that touches the sensor when wrapping the pecpad, then you will be wiping on finger grease.

« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2006, 14:21 »
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it isn't that hard not to touch the 'sweeping part' of the pec pad though.

I used 25 passes the other day and still had a few goobers on my sensor.  I don't want to calculate what it would of cost to use sensor swipes.

« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2006, 14:24 »
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actually i do want to calculate that.

it would have taken 2 boxes... $US 91.90

instead i spent $30 on a kit that is still good for another 75 passes

« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2006, 14:54 »
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Thanks Leaf, just placed my order at Copperhill


 

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