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Author Topic: Your recommendation for a point and shoot?  (Read 8297 times)

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« on: October 19, 2008, 17:08 »
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I am looking to get a little pocket sized camera to have with me at all times, especially when I cannot be lugging the DSLR etc.

Looking for something that can shoot with very low noise at least 400ISO. What are your experiences.


« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2008, 17:24 »
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I currently use a Nikon S210 for my p & s.  VERY nice camera, and inexpensive, ~$180 US.  It's loaded with features, compact, uses SD cards, 8mp, auto-face detection, etc.  It does use a rechargeable battery, but I don't find that a detriment, as I can get about 375-400 shots per charge with average use of the flash.  Plus, it came in a purple (plum) color, and I'm a purple FREAK!

Just my opinion........ :)

« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2008, 17:47 »
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Canon Powershot A-series is good.  I had a A520 (4MPix) and have had a A620 (7Mpix) for two years. It has manual overrides and histogram. There are some models now with image stabilization.

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2008, 20:11 »
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The Canon Powershot SD950 IS is one of the best P&S cameras available.  It has a larger sensor (1/1.7") than most P&S cameras (which normally have a 1/2.5"), which helps it take great images.  It goes for around $310.

If you don't want to spend that much, then the Canon Powershot SD1100 IS is another highly rated camera.  It goes for about $170.

« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2008, 21:41 »
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The SD-series has no manual options, or aperture/shutterspeed priority, or manual focus.  It's too automatic for me.  :)

I am not sure about its optical quality compared to the A-series too.  There may be differences in models, but I think the A-series has better optics in general (sharper, finer detail, less CA).

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2008, 23:52 »
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Perhaps the new Panasonic DMC-LX3.  Has anyone here been able to test it yet for serious shooting? The lens is only a wide to normal zoom (although with the Leica name on it), but the camera is supposed to be an excellent performer. I don't think it's available in USA yet.

« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2008, 01:28 »
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Where are the suggestions for the canon G series

Like these ones
Canon g10


Canon g9

« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2008, 07:51 »
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The SD-series has no manual options, or aperture/shutterspeed priority, or manual focus.  It's too automatic for me.  :)


I am not sure about the entire SD series, but the SD 950 (also know as the IXUS 960) does have a manual mode.  It is not fully manual, like a dSLR, but it does provide some abilities (such as setting ISO, metering, exposure compensation, white balance, color mode, etc).

It also has image stabilization (which I consider mandatory for indoor shots).  The image stabilization is optical and not digital (meaning that there are parts that move to stabilize the image as opposed to software doing it), which is hard to find in a compact camera.

The SD 950 also has the DIGIC III processor, which helps the 9 point autofocus system perform well.  DIGIC III and the larger sensor are some of the main reasons that this camera has outstanding images (especially for a compact camera).

I am not sure about its optical quality compared to the A-series too.  There may be differences in models, but I think the A-series has better optics in general (sharper, finer detail, less CA).


Sorry, but I have to respectfully disagree with you on this point.  Images out of the SD 950 are fantastic.  They don't compare to a dSLR (which has a much larger sensor), but they are some of the best P&S images that I have seen to date.

Most ISO 400 images from compact cameras are usually horrendous.  While the SD 950 images don't compare to a dSLR, they are at least palatable.

If anyone is interested, you can find reviews of the SD 950 here:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2007_reviews/canon_sd950.html

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/SD950IS/SD950ISA.HTM

http://www.trustedreviews.com/digital-cameras/review/2008/03/25/Canon-IXUS-960-IS/p1

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0708/07082003canonsd950is.asp

« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2008, 08:04 »
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Where are the suggestions for the canon G series

leaf:

While the Canon G series are great cameras, the OP was looking for a "little pocket sized camera".  I don't think that I would call those cameras "pocket sized".

« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2008, 08:20 »
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Well that is true that the G series isn't as 'pockety' as the SD series, but compared to a DSLR they are both pretty small and the G series is a better replacement - or perhaps what i mean is the best of both worlds, small pocket like, with manual controls easily available.

The SD series ARE smaller - about 1 cm in every direction, but still not small enough for a pants pocket.  While both cameras would fit fine in a jacket pocket.

« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2008, 17:32 »
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I haven't, personally, noticed any difference in optical quality between the SD and A-series Canons, but I will say this:  in general, the A-series has more zoom - 4x as a opposed to 3x in the SD series.  They are a little bulkier because they use AA batteries, too.  There are pros and cons to this, but I'll not go into them here 0  :)

« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2008, 18:02 »
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GeoPappas,

As I said, it may depend on the models. When I purchased my A620 and afterwards I checked also other models for a friend, I compared equivalent A and SD-series cameras (using Imaging Resource's Comparometer - I love that tool!), and the A ones had better results than the SD ones.

I understand however that this specific model is a very good camera, but if I were looking for a new compact for myself, I would still pick one to allow me to set aperture, shutterspeed or both, and other advanced options that are available in the A-series but not in the SD-series.  And AA-batteries, yes!

The A-series is however bulkier - not to a point of being a problem for me.  I don't know how it compares with the G-series.

Regards,
Adelaide

« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2008, 19:17 »
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My wife and I use a Canon A620 when we're out in the dirt, dirt, dirt (that is, places there is no way I'd pull out my good cams).  It takes a very good shot, fantastic as a family snapshot cam.  As a job cam,  well it's no 5D, but I have to say, we have sold quite a few pix that came out of the thing...     I got my money's worth out of it. Hey, it's a P&S,  you can only expect so much. 
      After we first got it,  I wasn't very pleased, but the thing grew on me.  8)=tom
« Last Edit: October 20, 2008, 19:27 by a.k.a.-tom »

j2k

« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2008, 10:27 »
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I have A720 IS. The only problem with it is that it is built with squeaky and easy to scratch plastic.

For the occasional stock shot it is well worth to go through the trouble of installing chdk firmware on those A-series cameras that are compatible. It is not very convenient to use, but the difference in quality between an in camera jpeg, and raw is substantial.  Especially when the photograph has a lot of fine details.

I still downsample the files from this camera to 4MP before submitting. And of course stick to the lowest iso if possible.


RacePhoto

« Reply #15 on: November 04, 2008, 10:52 »
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Where are the suggestions for the canon G series

leaf:

While the Canon G series are great cameras, the OP was looking for a "little pocket sized camera".  I don't think that I would call those cameras "pocket sized".


I have big pockets or you have small pockets, or maybe that 1/2 inch to 7/10" isn't really as big a difference as it seems?  ;D

G10
4.3 x 3.1 x 1.8 inches ; 12.3 ounces

SD950
3.8 x 2.4 x 1.1 inches ; 5.8 ounces

I agree that it's not the standard compact pocket camera. It doesn't fold up flat. However, when you look at the features, controls, RAW 14mp resolution, macro to 1cm (instead of 2 inches), 28mm wide vs 35mm on the SD950, both have 2.8 lenses, Automatic E-TTL Flash with EX-series Speedlites for G10, 1/4000th vs 1/1600, wired remote capability... For an inch here and there, the G10 gives many more features and much more control. Aprox. $100 more for a G10 than a SD950.

I'd rate it "not exactly a pocket camera" but I do carry a G6 in my photo vest pocket.

If someone wants a true pocket camera for snapshots, this isn't it. If someone wants a high quality small camera, that may fit into a pocket, and has more creative user controls, the G10 is the answer.

It would be the same as saying an SLR is big, then a rangefinder is the next step down, and P&S is a pocket camera. The G10 is more in the rangefinder category. It has almost all the controls of a DSLR but isn't through the lens. P&S is what it is.  ;)
« Last Edit: November 04, 2008, 10:57 by RacePhoto »

« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2008, 11:34 »
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Where are the suggestions for the canon G series

leaf:

While the Canon G series are great cameras, the OP was looking for a "little pocket sized camera".  I don't think that I would call those cameras "pocket sized".


I have big pockets or you have small pockets, or maybe that 1/2 inch to 7/10" isn't really as big a difference as it seems?  ;D

As I stated previously, the G series cameras are nice cameras, but the OP was looking for a "little" pocket sized camera.

For an inch here and there, the G10 gives many more features and much more control. Aprox. $100 more for a G10 than a SD950.

Amazon lists the Canon G10 at $475 and the Canon SD950 at $300.  That is about $175 more and more than half the cost extra of the SD950.

Plus, if you are going to go for a G series, then why not get a Canon Rebel XSi 450?  It's just a little larger and another $100 more!  I'm sure that your big pockets could hold one  ;)

« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2008, 20:55 »
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I use a G9 as my back-up to my DSLR but I would never consider using anything above ISO 100 for stock.  ISO 400 in my opinion is unusable for stock.
I've seen some photos at 100% from the new Panasonic LX3; the noise control at higher ISO's is better than the G9 but there's still that ever present Venus engine smear on the photos even at ISO 100.
Perhaps have a look at the Sigma DP1

« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2013, 22:20 »
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Just ordered a G15. I can't believe I actually did it. I've been a Nikon user since the early 70 but couldn't find anything compared to it by Nikon. I'm going on vacation next month and didn't want to take my D300 and all the gear. Hope I made the right decision. Seven years since the last vacation and I wanted something my wife could use as well. Wish me luck!

RacePhoto

« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2013, 11:51 »
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Quick reconsider. (just joking) But it is interesting. I'll want to see how this one does.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/indepth/canon/news/new-canon-pair-rebel-dslrs-zoom-lens-and-powershot-camera?BI=19285&kw=CanonSL1Article#Canon_EOS_Rebel_SL1

The new EOS Rebel SL1 is a highly compact and lightweight DSLR that features a large 18 megapixel APS-C CMOS image sensor and DIGIC 5 Image Processor for producing impressive image quality and high low-light sensitivity to an expandable ISO 25600. The DIGIC 5 processor contributes greatly to achieving notable image quality when working in low light, and also offers great speed throughout the camera, including a maximum continuous shooting rate of 4 fps. Full HD 1080p movie recording is supported, too, in multiple frame rates up to 30 fps, as well as HD 720p video at 60 fps. While recording video, the Movie Servo AF system enables continuous autofocusing...

Dimensions (WxHxD)    4.6 x 3.6 x 2.7"  (still not a pocket camera by any measure)

Touch screen? Someone tell me about touch screen on a camera. I'm a little skeptical about moving up to that?


Just ordered a G15. I can't believe I actually did it. I've been a Nikon user since the early 70 but couldn't find anything compared to it by Nikon. I'm going on vacation next month and didn't want to take my D300 and all the gear. Hope I made the right decision. Seven years since the last vacation and I wanted something my wife could use as well. Wish me luck!

« Reply #20 on: March 21, 2013, 13:55 »
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Could be very interesting. I'd like to see some shots.

« Reply #21 on: March 21, 2013, 15:27 »
+1
How about the Fujifilm X100s?
I would go for it, no doubt. Fuji has been releasing great jewels lately.
http://www.dpreview.com/previews/fujifilm-x100s


 

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