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Author Topic: 2TB cloud storage alternative  (Read 1529 times)

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Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« on: June 12, 2019, 08:43 »
0
You own the device, you have it at your home or location with internet. You control who can view or add images. Group, individual, Etc.

http://retail.sandisk.com/index.php/email/emailWebview

I'm not getting one, but I thought it was interesting because people have asked about travel and safe backup while on the road. 2T isn't huge, I'm sure there will be larger and competition. If I understood the promotional material, which is mostly fluff, you can send from any device, to your home storage unit.

A web connected 2T hard drive for $149 or $179 isn't a bad price. I don't need one, I'm not buying, or selling them. I just thought this was a new creative way to have photo sharing, and the owner controls everything. Personally SD cards and thumb drives are cheap enough that I can carry a pocket full. I have external drives, for backup in the field.

Private photo sharing device, is how I'd define it?


« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2019, 10:18 »
0
"This email is only viewable in the web viewer when clicking through the original emailTo try again, please go back to the email and click "View as Web Page""

Quote
I don't need one, I'm not buying, or selling them.

neither showing them to us!

:P :)

« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2019, 11:20 »
+1
I looked around on SanDisk's web site and can't see any product with 2TB in the price range you mention (and I got the same error message about viewing as web page). A quick google search didn't yield that combo

I think there would be issues you'd have to be concerned with about security of your storage - versus that's your cloud provider's worry - and what you'd do if power or internet went out at home while you were away (again possible at a cloud provider, but they have people around to fix it).

I'm curious though, so can you link to a product info page on SanDisk's site?

« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 11:31 »
0
An alternative method would to install team viewer on your home machine, then when your on the road, send files home with your travel laptop via team viewer.

Or use Dropbox

Or pay for a hosting service and upload via ftp

Or use backblaze backup

I have all of the above.

Uncle Pete

  • Great Place by a Great Lake - My Home Port
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2019, 10:42 »
+1
An alternative method would to install team viewer on your home machine, then when your on the road, send files home with your travel laptop via team viewer.

Or use Dropbox

Or pay for a hosting service and upload via ftp

Or use backblaze backup

I have all of the above.

Yes that's the idea, simple, wired to the internet 2T drive. Sorry about the link. Yes, it's WD drive, Sandisk is marketing, named ibi drive? Smart photo manager like having a private sharing site for family and friends. Privacy... control.

https://sameapk.com/sandisk-ibi-com-wdc-ibi/

Review: https://www.entertainment-focus.com/technology-section/technology-news/sandisk-release-ibi-their-new-smart-photo-manager/

I'm just posting for interest, new device technology. I use thumb drives, portable drives and at home have an array of external hard drives, backups and storage. I have Dropbox for documents and information I might want on the road. Personally I don't have a need or use for cloud backup.



« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2019, 11:45 »
+1
An alternative method would to install team viewer on your home machine, then when your on the road, send files home with your travel laptop via team viewer.

Or use Dropbox

Or pay for a hosting service and upload via ftp

Or use backblaze backup

I have all of the above.

You must not shoot much and/or only travel to places with very fast internet.  There is no way in the world traveling internet could ever keep up with my media.  And it is pretty common for me to be in places for a week or two with little or not internet at all.

A couple months ago I was in Iran for two weeks. Couldn't reach Backblaze or my own web site at all.  Last year I spent a month in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan.  Internet was dial-up speeds.

Personally I always travel with two 4TB USB drives.  One is backed up to every night. The other is backed up at the end of every week or when changing countries.  The laptop itself has a 4TB SSD, which is the primary location.  Thus, I always have 2 copies, and my third copy is never more than one week old.  The computer and each of the disks are all kept in different suitcases, so if one is stolen, I always have the other.

« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2019, 11:57 »
0
Personally I don't have a need or use for cloud backup.

Yes you do!  What happens when your house burns down?  Or a burglar breaks in and steals your computer and hard drives?

I have had the first happen to me. 

Just this morning I read in our local newsletter that someone is asking people to keep an eye out for her computer and disks, which were stolen in a burglary last night (they broke in and stole the stuff while she was sleeping in the house!).  Her final comment was that losing the computer was a nuisance, but the real problem is that she lost all her data and photos.

If she had BackBlaze or a similar cloud backup, she could be back up and running within hours of buying a replacement computer.  As is, she has lost all that forever...

In my case, my home data is all on a RAID disk, which protects against drive failure.  It is all backed up onto a second RAID disk via  TimeMachine every hour -- and that backup disk is in a separate room that is always locked (less chance of a burglar also breaking into there and getting the backup too).  All that is backed up continuously to the cloud on BackBlaze (though it is usually a few weeks behind - our internet is not fast enough for it to keep up).

I started in the computer field in 1969, when computers filled a large room. Got my first "personal computer" (a Data General Eclipse that cost me $21,000 -- or twice my annual salary at the time) in 1974.  I have seen lots of disk failures and fires and burglaries in those decades.  I am now set up so the chance of me losing my data is about that of my chance of dying from a lightning strike this year. :)

« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2019, 14:51 »
0
Personally I don't have a need or use for cloud backup.

Yes you do!  What happens when your house burns down?  Or a burglar breaks in and steals your computer and hard drives?


You can also keep backup 2T or 3T hard drives, old and new, both at home and in a bank safety box.

That's what I do, and I rotate them often enough so there's always a recent backup of all my digital assets (photos, videos, and books) in both places.

Unless a tornado sweeps away everything in our town, or a fire destroys it, I feel things are safe. However, I am now considering adding Backblaze to the mix after learning about it on this thread. Having visited that website and studied independent reviews, it seems like a fail-safe option to me.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2019, 14:53 by marthamarks »

« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2019, 15:42 »
+1
You can also keep backup 2T or 3T hard drives, old and new, both at home and in a bank safety box.

That was an approach I used in the 80's.  Every month I would go to the bank and swap out disks (actually DVDs in those days).

And, of course, the inevitable happened.  After doing this for years, I got complacent.  I skipped a month.  Then two. Then disaster struck and my main disk died.  Oops, my data was close to 3 months old, and everything done in those preceding 3 months was lost forever.

In my case, I was a software developer and that meant that 3 months worth of coding was lost.  By the nature of coding (once you have done correctly once, the next time is much faster), it "only" took me a month (of non-billable time, since I couldn't very well charge my clients for my own stupidity) to recover and get back to where I had been before the disaster.

No system that relies on your taking explicit difficult action (as in, more than pushing a button right in front of you) is a decent protection for your data.

In my current case, such a mechanism would not be feasible anyway. My main RAID is 80TB, and my backup drive is 50TB (which is rapidly becoming a problem...).  There ain't no safe deposit box big enough to put a 80TB drive, let alone two (one backup is NEVER safe), even if I did want to buy more $8,000 drives...

« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2019, 16:37 »
0
You can also keep backup 2T or 3T hard drives, old and new, both at home and in a bank safety box.

That was an approach I used in the 80's.  Every month I would go to the bank and swap out disks (actually DVDs in those days).

And, of course, the inevitable happened.  After doing this for years, I got complacent.  I skipped a month.  Then two. Then disaster struck and my main disk died.  Oops, my data was close to 3 months old, and everything done in those preceding 3 months was lost forever.

In my case, I was a software developer and that meant that 3 months worth of coding was lost.  By the nature of coding (once you have done correctly once, the next time is much faster), it "only" took me a month (of non-billable time, since I couldn't very well charge my clients for my own stupidity) to recover and get back to where I had been before the disaster.

No system that relies on your taking explicit difficult action (as in, more than pushing a button right in front of you) is a decent protection for your data.

In my current case, such a mechanism would not be feasible anyway. My main RAID is 80TB, and my backup drive is 50TB (which is rapidly becoming a problem...).  There ain't no safe deposit box big enough to put a 80TB drive, let alone two (one backup is NEVER safe), even if I did want to buy more $8,000 drives...

Yep, I get it. And in your case for sure, that makes absolute sense.

I tend to buy a new 2 or 3T hard drive every couple of years (easy enough as the price of storage comes down) and update all my files (old and new) to the new/old drives, making sure to get stuff onto them as soon as the images/videos are processed and the books progress. But my needs are super-simple compared to yours, especially since I'm a slow writer and I shoot in spurts as I get chances to travel, not continuously through the year.

Still, Backblaze looks like a fine improvement over my old, admittedly cumbersome system, so I'll probably sign up for it this weekend. I appreciated learning about it here from our colleague "Charged".
« Last Edit: June 14, 2019, 16:48 by marthamarks »


 

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